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Submission Summary: 0 pending, 5 declined, 3 accepted (8 total, 37.50% accepted)

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Submission + - Credit Score in China Based on Your Political Opinions and Those of Friends

njnnja writes: China is unveiling a new credit score, like a FICO score in the US, but in addition to measuring whether you pay your bills on time, it also measures whether you make "controversial" political statements. Even worse, your friends' credit scores will affect your own, so if you start to say things that the government doesn't like, you can expect your friends to either unfriend you (IRL) or try to convince you to toe the line. The government says that the system is optional (for now).

Submission + - Ask Slashdot: 1

njnnja writes: My wife receives periodic emails (about once every other month) from a cable company that is not in our service area that purport to confirm that she has made changes to her account, such as re-setting her password. Her email address is not a common one so we do not believe that it is someone accidentally using it; rather, we believe that an identity thief is subscribing to cable services intentionally using her name and email address.

Whenever we have gotten an email we have called the cable company, been forwarded to their security department, and we are assured that her social security number is not being used and that they will clear her name and email address out of their system. Yet a few weeks later we get another email. Our concern is that when the cable company goes after my wife for the unpaid balance on the account I am sure that neither they nor a collection agency will care much that it's not her social security number — it's her name and they will demand she pays.

We have a very strong password (long, completely random string of chars, nums, and symbols) and 2-factor authentication on the email account so we are fairly certain that no one is currently hacking into her email (at least, it's not worth it for however many thousands of dollars they can actually steal off this scam), But we think that the cable company should be doing more to not be complicit in an attempted identity theft. We have made it clear that we don't live in the area they cover so we should not have an account, but the fact that they keep setting up an account in her name means that they just don't care. Which is fine; I don't expect a cable company to care that they inconvenience us, but I would like to know if there is any way that we can make them care about it (liability, regulations, etc). I know YANAL but does anyone have any ideas about how to handle this? Thanks.

Submission + - Hotel charges guests $500 for bad online reviews

njnnja writes: In an incredibly misguided attempt to reduce the quantity of bad reviews (such as these), the Union Street Guest House, a hotel about 2 hours outside of New York City, had instituted a policy to charge groups such as wedding parties $500 for each bad review posted online. The policy has been removed from their webpage but the wayback machine has archived the policy.

If you have booked the Inn for a wedding or other type of event anywhere in the region and given us a deposit of any kind for guests to stay at USGH there will be a $500 fine that will be deducted from your deposit for every negative review of USGH placed on any internet site by anyone in your party and/or attending your wedding or event If you stay here to attend a wedding anywhere in the area and leave us a negative review on any internet site you agree to a $500. fine for each negative review.

Submission + - Social Media Company Stock CYNK is Worth $5 Billion Despite No Revenue or Assets 1

njnnja writes: In what might be considered a sign that there is another tech bubble, social media company CYNK stock has been on a tear lately, and in the course of about a month has increased in value about 25,000%, and now has a market cap of over $6 billion. However, the company appears to have no revenue, no assets, and only one employee.

Submission + - North Korea's Twitter and Flickr Accounts Hacked by Anonymous (

njnnja writes: With tensions on the Korean peninsula continuing to rise, Anonymous hacked into the government-run North Korean Flickr site to post a "wanted" poster for NK leader Kim Jong Un. It says that he is wanted for "threatening world peace" and "wasting money while his people starve to death". They also hacked into NK's Twitter account and posted a link to the Flickr page.

You have a massage (from the Swedish prime minister).