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Comment Re:Look for other users of the S/W for advice (Score 1) 149 149

You conveniently forgot that OP clearly stated "FEA/CFD", narrowing down the appliction area and available solutions more than sufficiently

I worked for a major CAD/CAM/FEA software maker and they have only recently added distributed computing capability to their software and it is still very limited in its capabilities. They still do not use GPU capabilities beyond rendering. While I know from my erstwhile colleagues who are now working for another major FEA/CFD maker, and their software has cluster computing capabilities for many years now, their software utilizes GPU too. So I agree with the its important to understand the capabilities/requirements of the S/W before you procure the hardware.

Submission + - The Quantum Experiment That Simulates A Time Machine

KentuckyFC writes: One of the extraordinary features of quantum mechanics is that one quantum system can simulate the behaviour of another that might otherwise be difficult to create. That's exactly what a group of physicists in Australia have done in creating a quantum system that simulates a quantum time machine. Back in the early 90s, physicists showed that a quantum particle could enter a region of spacetime that loops back on itself, known as a closed timelike curve, without creating grandfather-type paradoxes in which time travellers kill their grandfathers thereby ensuring they could never have existed to travel back in time in the first place. Nobody has ever built a quantum closed time-like curve but now they don't have to. The Australian team have simulated its behaviour by allowing two entangled photons to interfere with each other in a way that recreates the behaviour of a single photon interacting with an older version of itself. The results are in perfect agreement with predictions from the 1990s--there are no grandfather-type paradoxes. Interestingly, the results are entirely compatible with relativity, suggesting that this type of experiment might be an interesting way of reconciling it with quantum mechanics.

Submission + - Telomere-Lengthening Procedure Turns Clock Back Years in Human Cells-> 2 2

Zothecula writes: Researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine have developed a new procedure to increase the length of human telomeres. This increases the number of times cells are able to divide, essentially making the cells many years younger. This not only has useful applications for laboratory work, but may point the way to treating various age-related disorders – or even muscular dystrophy.
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Submission + - Georgia Institute of Technology Researchers Bridge the Airgap-> 1 1

An anonymous reader writes: Hacked has a piece about Georgia Institute of Technology Researchers keylogging from a distance using the electromagnetic radiation of CPUs. They can reportedly do this from up to 6 meters away. In this video, using two Ubuntu laptops, they demonstrate that keystrokes are easily interpreted with the software they have developed. In their whitepaper they talk about the need for more research in this area so that hardware and software manufacturers will be able to develop more secure devices. For now, Farraday cages don't seem as crazy as they used to, or do they?
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