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Comment Even with HAL (Score 3, Insightful) 312

I've installed HAL in my Arch box just to see if it'll work, and nope, it still doesn't.

Not in Firefox with the last supported Flash for Linux that uses NPAPI (, nor on Chromium, with Pepper Flash (11.6.602.171). hald is running and everything.

Why don't these guys learn from Steam? Make an effort, and they get some of the most loyal, most vocal platform zealots money can never buy; shun them, they get the most rabid haters.

I seriously hope Amazon reconsiders this move. I was this close to actually paying for an Amazon Prime subscription, but since I won't be able to stream on my PC (which solely runs Linux) nor on my phone (Android 4.1), they just lost a potential loyal customer to piracy (I downloaded Zombieland and Alpha House through TPB).


Submission + - SlashcAliister: How HP and open source can save We (

MikeTheGreat writes: Ian McCallister has another insightful article (print version here), this time discussing how HP has announced their intention to open source the ill-fated WebOS tablet operating system. He brings up some good points about whether HP is simply trying to "offload the cost of developing and maintaining" WebOS, and how committed HP is to ensuring the success of an open source WebOS.

Submission + - Self-Contained PC Liquid Coolers Explored (

MojoKid writes: "Over the last few years an increasing number of liquid coolers have been positioned as high-end alternatives to traditional heatsink and fan combinations. This has been particularly true in the boutique and high-end PC market, where a number of manufacturers now offer liquid coolers in one form or another. These kits are a far cry from the water coolers enthusiasts have been building for years. DIY water coolers typically involve separate reservoirs and external pumps. The systems tested here, including Intel's OEM cooler that was released with their Sandy Bridge-E CPU, contain significantly less fluid and use small pumps directly integrated into the cooling block as a self-contained solution. Integrated all-in-one kits may not offer the theoretical performance of a high-end home-built system, but they're vastly easier to install and require virtually no maintenance. The tradeoffs are more than fair, provided that the coolers perform as advertised."

Submission + - Why The NTSB Is Wrong About Cellphones (

YIAAL writes: After a multi-car pileup involving two school buses, the NTSB is urging states to ban all cellphones and personal electronic devices in cars, even hands-free phones. But on looking at the NTSB report, it appears that the big problem was a school bus driver who was following too closely, and another school bus driver who wasn't watching the road. Why is the NTSB targeting gadgets instead of bad drivers?

Submission + - Czech nationwide census shows jump in Jedi Knights (

il_genio writes: The Czech Statistical Office (SÚ) unveiled the first results of its regular 10-year census on Thursday. While almost half the population, 4.8 million, shied away from answering the voluntary religious question, a surprising strong showing was given by those Czechs who described themselves as Knights of the Jedi and believers in “the Force” as depicted in the Star Wars films. Overall, 15,070 Czechs identified themselves as Knights of the Jedi with the biggest proportion of adherents in the capital, Prague, with 3,977 followers or 0.31 percent of the population

Submission + - Running Tor on your TV (

jaromil writes: "TorTV is an early effort to embed Tor in household computing: run it on your TV at home. So far only WDTV installed with the homebrew WDLXTV firmware is supported. What other platforms do you think are viable for it?"

Submission + - Most Accurate Clock (

An anonymous reader writes: An optical clock that is twice as accurate as any other has been unveiled by physicists in the US. The clock, which is based on a singlealuminium ion, could remain accurate to within one second over 3.7 billion years. The previous record was held by a clock with onemercury ion, which was good to one second in 1.7 billion years.This clock usee a different principle quantum-interference protocol which makes it more accurate.

Submission + - Cloud Desktop Virtualization (

Cloudpersonal writes: Distributed Desktop Virtualization, all the benefits of desktop virtualization with out the Servers Resources investment. "Run Local Sycn Global"
Use Hypervisor type 1 to boot and execute local your desktop and sychronized it with the server.

The Military

Submission + - Electromagnetic weapons that destroy electronics, ( 2

PolygamousRanchKid writes: The wars of the 21st will be dominated by ray guns. That, at least, is the vision of a band of military technologists who are building weapons that work by zapping the enemy's electronics, rather than blowing him to bits.

America's air force is developing a range of them based on a type of radar called an active electronically scanned array (AESA). When acting as a normal radar, an AESA broadcasts its microwaves over a wide area. At the touch of a button, however, all of its energy can be focused onto a single point. If that point coincides with an incoming missile or aircraft, the target's electronics will be zapped. BAE Systems, a British defence firm, is building a ship-mounted electromagnetic gun. The High-Powered Microwave, as it is called, is reported by Aviation Week to be powerful enough to disable all of the motors in a swarm of up to 30 speedboats.Disabling communications and destroying missiles is one thing. Using heat-rays on the enemy might look bad in the newspapers, and put civilians off their breakfast.

To every action there is, of course, an equal and opposite reaction, and researchers are just as busy designing ways of foiling electromagnetic weapons as they are developing them.

PRK: I can't wait to buy that issue of MAKE!

Retirement means that when someone says "Have a nice day", you actually have a shot at it.