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Comment: Re:Supply? Demand? (Score 3, Insightful) 84

by nganju (#28145169) Attached to: Credit Crunch Squeezing Data Center Space
It's already profitable. The credit crunch has quashed new centers from being built because the credit markets are frozen due to irrational fears, something the supply/demand model does not account for. When the space dwindles the new centers will be built but there's a lag, it's not instant, also something supply/demand models do not account for. Let's leave the Econ 101 classroom theory alone and take a look at the real world. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Behavioral_economics

Comment: Re:Their site, their right. (Score 5, Funny) 202

by nganju (#26497829) Attached to: YouTube Muting, Removing Videos Involving Warner Music
Totally agree with you. Especially because as soon as you upload anything to the internet you've pretty much waived any of your content rights you had.

Now when I say that I don't mean it in the legal sense but in the realistic practical sense. Anything digital is pirated and shared.

We even have karma whores that copy & paste other peoples insightful comments.
Microsoft

Microsoft Adding jQuery To Visual Studio 67

Posted by CmdrTaco
from the well-isn't-that-special dept.
Tim Anderson writes "Microsoft's Scott Guthrie, Corporate VP of the .NET developer division, announced that the open source jQuery Javascript library will be integrated into Visual Studio, the main Windows development tool. Further, Microsoft will treat jQuery as a supported product within technical support contracts, and will use jQuery to build new controls for ASP.NET, its web platform."
The Courts

TorrentSpy Must Preserve Data In RAM For MPAA 489

Posted by kdawson
from the good-luck-finding-merkin-computers dept.
Transient writes "Reaffirming a magistrate's earlier decision, a federal judge has ordered TorrentSpy to begin keeping server logs as it defends itself against an MPAA lawsuit. In her opinion, Judge Florence-Marie Cooper interpreted federal discovery rules broadly. ' Judge Cooper took issue with TorrentSpy's argument that data in RAM is not "stored." She noted RAM's function as primary storage and that the storage of data in RAM — even if not permanently archived — makes it electronically stored information governed by federal discovery rules.' Given that TorrentSpy has limited access for users in the US, the ruling may be moot. But it does set a precedent for other, similar cases. 'Under this interpretation, any data stored in RAM could be subject to a subpoena, as at a basic level it is a "medium from which information can be obtained" just like a hard drive. '"
Censorship

Censoring a Number 1046

Posted by kdawson
from the you-can't-copyright-that dept.
Rudd-O writes "Months after successful discovery of the HD-DVD processing key, an unprecedented campaign of censorship, in the form of DMCA takedown notices by the MPAA, has hit the Net. For example Spooky Action at a Distance was killed. More disturbingly, my story got Dugg twice, with the second wave hitting 15,500 votes, and today I found out it had simply disappeared from Digg. How long until the long arm of the MPAA gets to my own site (run in Ecuador) and the rest of them holding the processing key? How long will we let rampant censorship go on, in the name of economic interest?" How long before the magic 16-hex-pairs number shows up in a comment here?

PS3 Lines Already Forming In America 452

Posted by samzenpus
from the get-a-life dept.
Wowzer writes "Nine days until Sony's PlayStation 3 launches in America, and lines are already forming. From the article: "Someone went to Best Buy this morning and saw about 7 people waiting outside. He went inside and one of the workers told him that they had been there since Monday. It must be a tough job being such big PS3 fans and being the butt of many passer-by jokes like 'Where is the line for PS4? Is it on the other side?'"

Wal-Mart Threatens Studios Over iTunes Sales 415

Posted by Zonk
from the how-dare-they dept.
Y-Crate writes "It seems Wal-Mart is threatening retaliation against studios who decide to offer movies on iTunes. The Bentonville, AR retailer seems a bit miffed that someone would dare to undercut their prices. This wouldn't be the first time they've turned on a supplier for dealing with Apple." From the article: "Last year when Disney announced it would begin offering episodes of the hit shows 'Lost' and 'Desperate Housewives' on Apple's iTunes, the reaction of the world's largest retailer sent shockwaves through the entertainment industry. Wal-Mart, worried that offering the shows for viewing on iPods would cut into DVD sales at its stores, sent 'cases and cases' of DVDs back to Disney, according to a source familiar with the matter."

Continued Opposition To Laptops in Schools 528

Posted by Zonk
from the grinding-for-faction-in-math-class dept.
theskeptic writes "The WSJ has an article about opposition to programs that provide laptops to 6-8th grade kids. Detractors say that the kids are wasting too much time online browsing dangerous sites, instant messaging friends, and posting to Myspace. Parents are worried that serious learning is being neglected in the quest to 'dazzle up presentations with fancy fonts instead of digging through library books.' Some parents however are 'enthusiastic laptop proponents,' one saying the laptop has helped her twelve-year-old son 'master critical professional skills like how to compile a PowerPoint presentation.'" Gaaah.

Is Simplified Spelling Worth Reform? 1183

Posted by timothy
from the a-pruh-po-or-rediculous dept.
digitalhermit writes "I guess many folks are of very little brain, and big words bother them... There's a push for simpler spelling. Instead of 'weigh' it would be 'way.' 'Dictionary' would be 'dikshunery' and so forth. Dunno if it's a joke, but it seems in earnest. Mark Twain must be spinning around somewhere." Twain is often credited with the satirical call for spelling reform called "A Plan for the Improvement of English Spelling," though according to Wikipedia, Twain was "actually a supporter of reform," and the piece may have been written by M.J. Shields. Benjamin Franklin was another champion of spelling reform, and even came up with a phonetic alphabet to implement such reform.

Heuristics are bug ridden by definition. If they didn't have bugs, then they'd be algorithms.

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