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Comment: Re:Smartphone with 50 Megapixel CCD sensor ? (Score 1) 94

by newbie_fantod (#48676345) Attached to: Kodak-Branded Smartphones On the Way

The only way Kodak can really make a difference... is to equip the Kodak branded smartphone with its own 50 Megapixel CCD sensor

If they released a 100% open phone with complete and transparent control over what data gets transmitted and stored, that would make a difference. Somehow though, I expect the 50MP sensor is more likely.

+ - Wikipedia reports 50 links from Google 'forgotten'->

Submitted by netbuzz
netbuzz (955038) writes "The Wikimedia Foundation this morning reports that 50 links to Wikipedia from Google have been removed under Europe’s “right to be forgotten” regulations, including a page about a notorious Irish bank robber and another about an Italian criminal gang. “We only know about these removals because the involved search engine company chose to send notices to the Wikimedia Foundation. Search engines have no legal obligation to send such notices. Indeed, their ability to continue to do so may be in jeopardy. Since search engines are not required to provide affected sites with notice, other search engines may have removed additional links from their results without our knowledge. This lack of transparent policies and procedures is only one of the many flaws in the European decision.”"
Link to Original Source

+ - The Long and Winding Road to the Surveillance Society->

Submitted by smugfunt
smugfunt (8972) writes "There is a new blog post by Adam Curtis tracing some of the strange connections and interesting characters in the evolution of the digital Panopticon we find ourselves living in. He posits that many of the data-driven systems now used in all sectors of society have the effect (deliberate and accidental) of forestalling change/fostering stability. As always, he brings to our attention some hitherto unnoticed 'men behind the curtain'."
Link to Original Source

+ - Microsoft Kills Security Update Emails, Blames Canada->

Submitted by tsu doh nimh
tsu doh nimh (609154) writes "In a move that may wind up helping spammers, Microsoft is blaming a new Canadian anti-spam law for the company’s recent decision to stop sending regular emails about security updates for its Windows operating system and other Microsoft software. Some anti-spam experts who worked very closely on Canada’s Anti-Spam Law (CASL) say they are baffled by Microsoft’s response to a law which has been almost a decade in the making. Indeed, an exception in the law says it does not apply to commercial electronic messages that solely provide “warranty information, product recall information or safety or security information about a product, goods or a service that the person to whom the message is sent uses, has used or has purchased.” Several people have observed that Microsoft likely is using the law as a convenient excuse for dumping an expensive delivery channel."
Link to Original Source

+ - Canadian Supreme Court Delivers Huge Win For Internet Privacy->

Submitted by Anonymous Coward
An anonymous reader writes "For the past several months, many Canadians have been debating privacy reform, with the government moving forward on two bills involving Internet surveillance and expanded voluntary, warrantless disclosure of personal information. Today, the Supreme Court of Canada entered the debate and completely changed the discussion, issuing its long-awaited R. v. Spencer decision, which examined the legality of voluntary warrantless disclosure of basic subscriber information to law enforcement. Michael Geist summarizes the findings, noting that the unanimous decision included a strong endorsement of Internet privacy, emphasizing the privacy importance of subscriber information, the right to anonymity, and the need for police to obtain a warrant for subscriber information except in exigent circumstances or under a reasonable law."
Link to Original Source

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