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Comment: The local version (Score 1) 230 230

by neurophys (#46882211) Attached to: One-a-Day-Compiles: Good Enough For Government Work In 1983

In 1981 I had the change to play with an HP system on its way out of production. To make a program you had to:
Load an editor from a punch (paper) band
Type in your programme
Save the source to punch tape
Load the compiler pass 1
Load the source
Run compiler
Save intermediate code to punch tape
Load compiler pass 2
Load intermediate code
Run compiler pass 2
Save compiled code to punch tape
Load linker
Load compiled code
Run linker
Save executable to tape
Load programme and test run

Pål

Comment: Neurons in human brain (Score 4, Insightful) 56 56

by neurophys (#43220835) Attached to: Activity of Whole Fish Brains Mapped Second To Second

Nice work. I look forward to see the 1 millisecond time reolution. The researchers state that the human brain contain 85000*100000 -> 8.5 billion neurons. Most textbooks says the human brain has about 100 billion neurons. There are also papers out telling that the neocortex of a young male contain about 22.8 billion neurons (Pakkenberg). So the human brain is much more complex than stated.

Microsoft

ITC Investigates Xbox 360 After Motorola Complaint 71 71

Posted by Soulskill
from the papers-please dept.
FlorianMueller writes "The US International Trade Commission, which is increasingly popular as a patent enforcement agency, voted to investigate a complaint filed by Motorola against Microsoft last month. Motorola claims that the Xbox infringes five of its patents. In October, Microsoft complained against Motorola, alleging patent infringement by its Android-based smartphones. Apple, Nokia and HTC are also involved with ITC investigations as complainants and respondents. A new one-page overview document shows the ongoing ITC investigations related to smartphones and the products that the complainants would like to have banned from entry into the US market. The good news is that any import bans won't be ordered until long after Christmas. The ITC is faster than courts, but not that fast."
Crime

Thief Returns Stolen Laptop Contents On USB Stick 352 352

Posted by samzenpus
from the it's-been-a-pleasure-being-your-victim dept.
While it's true that Sweden is responsible for unleashing IKEA and ABBA on humanity, not everything they produce is terrible. Their thieves are some of the most considerate in the world. An unnamed professor at Umeå University received a USB stick with all his data after his laptop was stolen. From the article: "The professor, who teaches at Umeå University in northern Sweden, was devastated when ten years of work stored on his laptop was stolen. But to his surprise, a week after the theft, the entire contents of his laptop were posted to him on a USB stick. 'I am very happy,' the unnamed professor told the local Västerbottens-Kuriren newspaper. 'This story makes me feel hope for humanity.'"

Comment: How stay on top. (Score 1) 239 239

by neurophys (#33007024) Attached to: The Scalability of Linus

It is touched at above and you touch the issue: As long as you move faster than the others, people follow. When you slow down, people find others to follow. This is also true in commercial business - when companies start using lawers instead of developers they have lost.
As long as Linus seems to keep up the steam, the rest follows, when he slows down, people will follow others. The bus-factor? There are clever people around who will be followed. Some will fight to take over Linus' position. If they get close to it, the development is already somewhere else.

Image

The 10 Most Absurd Scientific Papers 127 127

Posted by samzenpus
from the burning-potential-of-fire dept.
Lanxon writes "It's true: 'Effects of cocaine on honeybee dance behavior,' 'Fellatio by fruit bats prolongs copulation time,' and 'Are full or empty beer bottles sturdier and does their fracture-threshold suffice to break the human skull?' are all genuine scientific research papers, and all were genuinely published in journals or similar publications. Wired's presentation of a collection of the most bizarrely-named research papers contains seven other gems, including one about naval fluff and another published in The Journal of Sex Research."

Comment: Re:It's not a law!!! (Score 1) 418 418

by neurophys (#29741691) Attached to: The Ultimate Limit of Moore's Law

If you want to make a product and you expect to hae it in the marked in two years, you would drop the idea if your product does not fit in the marked included effects of Moore's law. Nobody would make a product that don't comply with the "law". It is driving/regulating the marked.

Pål

Comment: Again? What is the new take this time? (Score 1) 373 373

by neurophys (#28098629) Attached to: Company Claims EEG Scans Can Help Identify ADHD

One of the biggest and best attempts to diagnose psychiatry by EEG-measures was R. John in the 1980-1990. His methods failed in practical use.

There are no publications sited by Pubmed on this, but EImindAs website and the linked article gives an impression of this being the same again. Don't hold your breath.

PGL

The rate at which a disease spreads through a corn field is a precise measurement of the speed of blight.

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