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Space

A Hyper-Velocity Impact In the Asteroid Belt? 114

Posted by Soulskill
from the i-played-that-game dept.
astroengine writes "Astronomers have spotted something rather odd in the asteroid belt. It looks like a comet, but it's got a circular orbit, similar to an asteroid. Whether it's an asteroid or a comet, it has a long, comet-like tail, suggesting something is being vented into space. Some experts think it could be a very rare comet/asteroid hybrid being heated by the sun, but there's an even more exciting possibility: It could be the first ever observation of two asteroids colliding in the asteroid belt."
Wii

Wii Hardware Upgrade Won't Happen Soon 325

Posted by Soulskill
from the can't-show-ugly-mario-in-hd dept.
As high-definition graphics become more and more entrenched in this generation of game consoles, Nintendo has had to deal with constant speculation about a new version of the Wii that would increase its capabilities. Today, Nintendo of America president Reggie Fils-Aime bluntly denied that a hardware revision was imminent, saying, "We are confident the Wii home entertainment console has a very long life in front of it." He added, "In terms of what the future holds, we've gone on record to say that the next step for Nintendo in home consoles will not be to simply make it HD, but to add more and more capability, and we'll do that when we've totally tapped out all of the experiences for the existing Wii. And we're nowhere near doing that yet."

Comment: topology (Score 1) 466

by neuromountain (#30670502) Attached to: Which Math For Programmers?
If you are dealing with higher dimensional data and metric spaces, I think topology and related disciplines may be of value. Understanding the structure of your data will allow for the design and development of unique tools with which to handle it, an example being new dissimilarity metrics. As an aside, some of the best programmers I have known were musicians and linguists, with little understanding of the math behind the problem, but an intuitive and often very different instinct for unique solutions.

Comment: common sense perhaps... (Score 1) 170

by neuromountain (#22727752) Attached to: The Geometry of Music
If you are dealing with an 88-key (or however many key) instrument and a ten-fingered human, one would think that music is a sequences trajectory of ten-dimensional subspaces in an 88-dimensional space. A rather binary one. It would be interesting to see how to model the interactions of multiple instruments with different dimensionalities.

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