Catch up on stories from the past week (and beyond) at the Slashdot story archive


Forgot your password?
Take advantage of Black Friday with 15% off sitewide with coupon code "BLACKFRIDAY" on Slashdot Deals (some exclusions apply)". ×
PlayStation (Games)

Submission + - SPAM: Sony admits the PSP Go was overpriced; pirated

almehdaaol writes: During its initial release late last year, the Sony PSP Go hasn't exactly garnered the attention that Sony thought it would. Some blame piracy, while others have gawked at the portable's high price tag. In a recent interview, the vice president of PR for SCEA has admitted the company's challenges.
Link to Original Source

Submission + - The USOMB is seeking public comments on copyright.

Photographer writes: "The USOMB is seeking public comments on copyright enforcement.

The Federal Government is currently undertaking a landmark effort to develop an intellectual property enforcement strategy building on the immense knowledge and expertise of the agencies charged with enforcing intellectual property rights. By committing to common goals, the Government will more effectively and efficiently combat intellectual property infringement. In this request for comments, the Government, through the office of the Intellectual Property Enforcement Coordinator (``IPEC''), invites public input and participation in shaping an effective intellectual property enforcement strategy.

You can go here for the summary or just send an email here:"
The Internet

Submission + - Four type of Americans have no Internet (

markmark57 writes: The Federal Communications Commission announced plans to launch its National Broadband Plan next month, which will provide high-speed Internet connections to over 93 million Americans who currently don't use Internet.

In a survey conducted by the FCC in November last year, it found that only 78 percent of U.S. adults are Internet users and 65 percent are broadband adopters. Incredibly, six percent of Americans still use dial-up access and four percent have no broadband at home at all. The report showed the main reasons why some users are resistant to set up the Internet is because they lack the knowledge or financially unable. This can then be further divided into four profiles of those who are yet to adopt broadband, and in some cases, Internet.

The Internet

Submission + - WiMAX vs. HSPA+

adeelarshad82 writes: Current 3G networks which offer speeds of 1-2 megabit range are great for web surfing. However, given today’s multimedia craze, networks are shifting towards faster speeds. This is where WiMAX and HSPA+ come in. PCMag's Sascha Segan recently tested out Sprint's Xohm WiMax (aka 4G) and T Mobile's recently announced HSPA+ network to see which is faster. According to the test WiMax offered an average of 2.25 megabits down and 628 kilobits up, with peaks of 5.13 down and 1.17 up. Although Sprint pledges that their WiMAX delivers 3-6 megabits of downstream bandwidth, with peaks up to 10 megabits. On the other hand HSPA+ got average download speeds of 3.12 megabits/sec and 1.26 megabits/sec up, with peaks of 7.65 megabits/sec and 2.02. However, theoretically HSPA+ networks are suppose to have download speeds of 21 Mbps and upload speeds of 5.8 Mbps. While HSPA+ is clearly much faster than WiMax, one clear disadvantage HSPA+ has is its 5GB which is not a problem with the WiMax network.
Input Devices

Submission + - Novint Falcon 3-D Controller Supported by Valve (

Erik J writes: "A number of Valve's PC shooters will soon support Novint's Falcon controller, part of a new agreement the companies have announced. Serving as an alternative to the traditional mouse-based FPS control scheme, the Novint Falcon allows for 'three-dimensional freedom of movement and tactile response.' Support for the peripheral will be introduced in an update through Valve's digital download platform Steam. Games slated to support the controller include Half-Life 2 and its two following episodes, Team Fortress 2, Portal, Counter-Strike: Source and the upcoming title Left 4 Dead."
Linux Business

LGP To Introduce Game Copy Protection 388

libredr writes "Phoronix reports that Linux Game Publishing have developed an Internet-based copy protection which will be used in their upcoming commercial game port, such as Sacred: Gold. Any user will be able to install the game, but to launch it he will need to provide a valid key and a password, which are validated against LGP's servers. The key/password combination will allow a user to install the software on different computers. However, an Internet connection will be required even for a single-player game, which might be a hassle for some users. This scheme has enraged some of the beta testers and LGP CEO, Michael Simms, responded he regrets he has to introduce a copy protection scheme, but has to do this since a lot more people download their titles instead of buying them, to the point they even received support requests for pirated version. But will every pirated copy magically transforms into a sale, or will this scheme just annoy legitimate users and be cracked anyway? One really wonders."

Targeting PocketPCs With Mono? 90

That's What She Said writes "I am a long time Mac user and, as most people like me, I have some particular problems with Microsoft technologies. I need to develop applications for the PocketPC platform (Windows CE and Windows Mobile), some simple data collection applications for barcode-enabled portable data terminals. Every device manufacturer on the market offer SDK's for .NET, so I believe this is the way to go. I already tried Microsoft Visual Studio and I am having serious problems using the IDE. I simply don't understand it quite well. My programming experience comes from PHP and JavaScript, where all I needed was a simple text editor and to keep my work as tidy as I could. So, it seems that a full-fledged IDE is kind of scary to me or Visual Studio is not very good for beginners. I also want to keep my costs low and free alternatives are welcome." Read on for a bit more (below) on why TWSS is thinking about Mono as a development environment, and is seeking advice.

Ultra-Dense Galaxies In the Early Universe 19

Science Daily is reporting on the characterization of a population of ancient galaxies, formed less than 3 billion years after the Big Bang, that are as massive as some modern galaxies but are only 1/20 the size. Each of the 9 compact galaxies found is less than 5,000 light-years across, and could fit comfortably inside the Milky Way's central hub (if you moved the supermassive black hole out first). The stars in these galaxies were 1/2 to 1 billion years old when observed and at least one generation of massive stars had already exploded as supernovae.

House Republicans Renew Push for Telecom Immunity 123

CNet is running an update to the controversy over giving telecommunications giants such as AT&T immunity from lawsuits involving the assistance they gave the NSA for illegal wiretaps. Republican leaders are circulating a petition which would force a vote on the bill passed by the Senate but not by the House. Democrats are holding out for a version of the FISA bill which opens the telecoms to prosecution. President Bush still intends to veto any such document. "At a wide-ranging House hearing on Wednesday, FBI Director Robert Mueller again urged passage of a bill that includes immunity for phone companies, arguing that 'uncertainty' among the carriers 'affects our ability to get info as fast and as quickly as we would want.' He admitted, however, that he was not aware of any wiretap requests being denied because of Congress' inaction."

Star Cooler Than Venus Found 55

crossconnects writes to mention that Discovery is reporting that astronomers have found a nearby star with a mild surface temperature of 660 degrees fahrenheit. "The spectacularly unspectacular object is of special interest because it falls right smack in the middle of the final frontier that divides mega-planets from the puniest stars. Stars in that realm theoretically qualify as an entirely new stellar type -- what's called a Y class dwarf."

OpenSSH Releases Version 5.0 41

os2man lets us know that OpenSSH version 5.0 has been released. The mirrors are linked from the top page. "OpenSSH (OpenBSD Secure Shell) is a set of computer programs providing encrypted communication sessions over a computer network using the ssh protocol. It was created as an open source alternative to the proprietary Secure Shell software suite offered by SSH Communications Security. OpenSSH is available for almost any Operating System."

Ask Founder About Detecting Media Bias 299 is not the Microsoft-funded Blews experiment that is supposed to help detect rightness and leftness in stories based on blogs that link to them. Instead of detecting blog links, Skewz relies on readers to submit and rate stories, and even tries to pair stories that have "liberal" and "conservative" biases so that you can get multiple takes on the same event or pronouncement. The Skewz About page explains how it works. The site has drawn a fair amount of "media insider" attention, including a writeup on the Poynter Institute website. But what does all this mean? Where is it going? Can help us sort our news better and make more informed decisions? We don't know. But if you post a question here for founder Vipul Vyas, maybe he'll have an answer for you. (Please try to follow the usual Slashdot interview rules.)

Material Converts Radiation Into Electricity 146

holy_calamity writes "Nuclear powered space probes like Pioneer have 'nuclear batteries' that (very inefficiently) convert heat from decaying isotopes into electricity. US researchers think a new material that converts radiation directly into power instead could make nuclear batteries 20 times more efficient. (Unfortunately they will likely not be user-replaceable.) The material consists of gold, carbon nanotubes, and lithium hydride."

Must a CD Cost $15.99? 586

scionite0 sends us to Rolling Stone for an in-depth article on Wal-Mart and the music business. Wal-Mart is the largest music retailer selling "an estimated one out of every five major-label albums" in the US. Wal-Mart willingly loses money selling CDs for less than $10 in order to draw customers into the store, but they are tired of taking a loss on CDs. The mega-retailer is telling the major record labels to lower the price of CDs or risk losing retail space to DVDs and video games. (Scroll to the bottom of the article for a breakdown of where exactly the money goes on a $15.99 album sale.) "[A Wal-Mart spokesman said:] 'The record industry needs to refine their business models, because the consumer is the ultimate arbitrator. And the consumer feels music isn't properly priced.' [While music executives are quoted:] 'While Wal-Mart represents nearly twenty percent of major-label music sales, music represents only about two percent of Wal-Mart's total sales. If they got out of selling music, it would mean nothing to them. This keeps me awake at night.' [And another:] 'Wal-Mart has no long-term care for an individual artist or marketing plan, unlike the specialty stores, which were a real business partner. At Wal-Mart, we're a commodity and have to fight for shelf space like Colgate fights for shelf space.'"

God is real, unless declared integer.