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Comment: Re:good (Score 1) 293

by nes11 (#34179106) Attached to: Is Your Laptop Cooking Your Testicles?

Mind you, my primary form of contraception is never having sex. My wife hates to try (her idea of foreplay is, "I think I'm drunk enough. Go.") and I had to give up after years of nothing but bad sex followed by 30 minutes of her crying afterwards. I'm no good for entertainment, no good for reproduction. What good am I?

I don't want to post any more. I'm sad.

I wish this didn't make me laugh so hard. Now I feel bad. nah, no i don't.

Software

+ - Who thinks Firehose software is working right? 6

Submitted by
NewYorkCountryLawyer
NewYorkCountryLawyer writes "I find the Firehose software to be infuriating. It seems to have no 'stickiness' but constantly reverts to other views and searches than what I was looking at. I'm about ready to give up on it unless they tell me they recognize it's dumb and are doing something to make it work right. Am I the only one who feels this way?"
The Media

+ - Red scientology tomato rotting in Firehose?-> 1

Submitted by Anonymous Coward
An anonymous reader writes "A posting to the Slashdot Firehose related to a Wikinews story on Wikileaks and legal threats from Scientology, seems to be stuck in the Slashdot firehose red as a ripe tomato for more than 24 hours.
The story that covers a recent press release on Wikileaks relating to copyright claims made by the Church's legal representatives towards the published "Operating Thetan" cult manual, worth hundreds of thousands of dollars in scam money, already spawned a hot discussion on the Wikinews portal. With critics of cult-critics trying to shut the story down for hours, it finally went online. And now seems stuck in the Firehose. One can only hope not for the wrong reasons."

Link to Original Source
Math

Calculating the Date of Easter 336

Posted by kdawson
from the computus-giganticus dept.
The God Plays Dice blog has an entertaining post on how the date of Easter is calculated. Wikipedia has all the messy details of course, but the blog makes a good introduction to the topic. "Easter is the date of the first Sunday after the first full moon on or after March 21... [T]he cycle of Easter dates repeat themselves every 5,700,000 years. The cycle of epacts (which encode the date of the full moon) in the Julian calendar repeat every nineteen years. There are two corrections made to the epact, each of which depend[s] only on the century; one repeats (modulo 30, which is what matters) every 120 centuries, the other every 375 centuries, so the [p]air of them repeat every 300,000 years. The days of the week are on a 400-year cycle, which doesn't matter because that's a factor of 300,000. So the Easter cycle has length the least common multiple of 19 and 300,000, which is 5,700,000 [years]."
Internet Explorer

+ - What the CIA really thinks of Internet Explorer 3

Submitted by
Mike
Mike writes "Ever wonder what the CIA really thinks of Microsoft's Internet Explorer? How about just viewing the source of some of their javascript programs. When defining variables to define the browser the client uses, the CIA is very specific. Just look at the javascript source for the program found here: https://www.cia.gov/kids-page/games/break-the-code/code-1.html and you will see the CIA is telling the kiddies of the world that Microsoft's Internet Explorer is: bugRiddenCrashPronePieceOfJunk.

Here is the sample code:
var bugRiddenCrashPronePieceOfJunk=(navigator.userAgent.indexOf('MSIE 5')!=-1&&navigator.userAgent.indexOf('Mac')!=-1)

Nice. At the very least, you see how the CIA views the browser."

Microsoft Opens Its Security Research Cookbooks 87

Posted by Soulskill
from the now-cook-me-up-some-pie dept.
greg65535 writes "Today Microsoft launched a blog about the internals of their IT security research and patch development process. There are already some posts that you will not find in the official security bulletins or KB articles. One of the posts says, 'We periodically identify workarounds or mitigations like this that we can't use for official guidance because they're either too nuanced or have some exception cases. When we discover something potentially useful but are uncomfortable listing it in the bulletin, we'll do our best to describe it here in this blog.' It looks like Microsoft is making an effort to become more 'open' in the area of security research and communication."
Software

+ - Software Firewall for Windows? 2

Submitted by
Futurepower(R)
Futurepower(R) writes "We have found that providing security is our biggest expense in using Windows, much more than the cost of buying Windows.

Can you recommend a software firewall for Windows? We need outbound leak protection. (Windows firewall does not provide leak protection.) When one program tries to use another, we need notification of the names and locations of both programs. We would like email notification of intrusion attempts.

We know about the Matousec firewall tests, but those are only leak tests.

Recent versions of the software firewall we have been using have been slowing some computers to a crawl, interfering with our backup software, randomly blocking our remote access software, and stealing focus when it does automatic updates at times that cannot be controlled. (We use a hardware firewall, too, of course, and limit user rights.)"
Security

+ - AVG Anti-Virus to Users: Pray for mercy, infidels!-> 1

Submitted by Lincoln6Echo
Lincoln6Echo (666) writes "I've been using and reselling AVG products for a few years now. Lately they appear to have begun a campaign to "be more corporate". I'd like to add my two cents towards their new corporate image and to user's impression of non-compromised AVG updates: remove the page that says "Pray for mercy, infidels!" from your SSL protected website. I found it when I made a mistake logging into the resellers console at https://biz.grisoft.cz/ (not https://biz.grisoft.com/) which is supposed to now redirect you to https://secure.grisoft.com."
Link to Original Source
Books

+ - The Home Library Problem Solved-> 1

Submitted by
Zack Grossbart
Zack Grossbart writes "About 18 months ago I posted the following question to Ask SlashDot, "How do you organize a home library with 3,500 books?" I have read all the responses, reviewed most of the available software, and come up with a good solution described in the article The Library Problem. This article discusses various cataloging schemes, reviews cheap barcode scanners, and outlines a complete solution for organizing your home library. Now you can see an Ask SlashDot question with a definitive answer."
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Programming

+ - Are you proud of your code? 6

Submitted by Anonymous Coward
An anonymous reader writes "I have a problem and I am hoping /. group therapy is the cure, so get on with the +5 comments, post haste! I am downright embarrassed by the quality of my work; specifically, my code. It is buggy, slow, fragile, and a nightmare to maintain. Documentation, requirements, automated tests? Does not exist. Do you feel the same way? If so, then what is holding you back from realizing your full potential? More importantly, what if anything are you planning to do about it? This picture, which many of you have already seen, captures several project failure modes. It would be humorous if it weren't so depressingly true. I enjoy programming and have from a young age (cut my teeth on BASIC on an Apple IIe). I have worked for companies large and small in a variety of languages and platforms. Sadly the one constant in my career is that I am assigned to projects that drift, seemingly aimlessly, from inception to a point where the client runs out of funding and the project is abandoned. Like many young and idealistic university graduates I hoped to spend my life programming passionately, but ten years later I look in the mirror and see a whore. I'm just doing it for the money. Have any developers here successfully lobbied their company to stop or cut back on 'cowboy coding' and adopt best practices? I'm not talking about the methodology-of-the-week, I'm referring to good old fashioned advice like keeping SQL out of the UI layer. For the big prize: has anyone convinced their superiors that the customer isn't always right and saying no once in awhile is the best course of action? Thanks in advance for your helpful advice."
Robotics

+ - DARPA funding real Star Wars AT-AT walkers->

Submitted by machinehead39
machinehead39 (1183973) writes "Here's a cool video. Boston Dynamics received funding from DARPA to develop what looks like a real Empire Strikes Back AT-AT walker. At first glance this small prototype looks fake, but keep watching. It's almost spooky. You feel bad for it it when the guy gives it a kick. It'll be interesting to see what the military uses these robots for. This thing's too cool not to be developed all the way."
Link to Original Source
The Media

+ - Hurricane Expert Calls Gore Theory "Ridiculous-> 5

Submitted by DrWho520
DrWho520 (655973) writes "ONE of the world's foremost meteorologists has called the theory that helped Al Gore share the Nobel Peace Prize "ridiculous" and the product of "people who don't understand how the atmosphere works".
Dr William Gray, a pioneer in the science of seasonal hurricane forecasts, told a packed lecture hall at the University of North Carolina that humans were not responsible for the warming of the earth."

Link to Original Source
The Internet

Journal: Mouseovers - as bad as popups? 8

Journal by fyngyrz

Is anyone else as annoyed as I am by words and phrases in web articles that pop up boxes because my mouse pointer happened to cross them, temporarily hiding the content I was reading in the first place? I didn't click on anything, and consequently, I don't want a context change. I find these annoying to the point of noting what the site is and not going back. Anyone else feel the same? Anyone have a defense of the practice?

Nothing is impossible for the man who doesn't have to do it himself. -- A.H. Weiler

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