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Submission + - Light-based memory chip is first to permanently store data (sciencemag.org)

sciencehabit writes: Today’s electronic computer chips work at blazing speeds. But an alternate version that stores, manipulates, and moves data with photons of light instead of electrons would make today’s chips look like proverbial horses and buggies. Now, one team of researchers reports that it has created the first permanent optical memory on a chip, a critical step in that direction. If a more advanced photonic memory can be integrated with photonic logic and interconnections, the resulting chips have the potential to run at 50 to 100 times the speed of today’s computer processors.

Submission + - Hotel fines $500 for every bad review posted online (pagesix.com)

mpicpp writes: A hotel in tony Hudson, NY, has found a novel way to keep negative reviews off Yelp and other sites — fine any grousing guests.
The Union Street Guest House, near Catskills estates built by the Vanderbilts and Rockefellers, charges couples who book weddings at the venue $500 for every bad review posted online by their guests.

“Please know that despite the fact that wedding couples love Hudson and our inn, your friends and families may not,” reads an online policy. “If you have booked the inn for a wedding or other type of event ... and given us a deposit of any kind ... there will be a $500 fine that will be deducted from your deposit for every negative review ... placed on any internet site by anyone in your party.”

In response to a review complaining of rude treatment over a bucket of ice, the proprietors shot back: “I know you guys wanted to hang out and get drunk for 2 days and that is fine. I was really really sorry that you showed up in the summer when it was 105 degrees ... I was so so so sorry that our ice maker and fridge were not working and not accessible.”
Oddly, the hotel didn’t respond to a request for comment.
If you take down the nasty review, you’ll get your money back.

http://www.cnn.com/2014/08/04/...

Submission + - Former Obama "digital strategist" accused of Twitter fraud (dailycaller.com)

Zondar writes: Former Obama "digital strategist" Brad Schenck has been accused of creating multiple fake Twitter accounts to send pro gun control tweets to members of Congress. One recipient of these tweets, Rep Steve Stockman (R-TX) said his staff noticed identical tweets coming in from multiple Twitter accounts. Of those, a disturbing trend was discovered:

"Stockman said that in response to Obama’s call for people to tweet their congressman in support of gun control legislation, he received just 16 tweets. But he said all of these messages were identical, and that a closer look at them revealed that only six were from real people."

Brad Schenck, Obama's former digital strategist, somehow managed to follow these some or all of the 10 allegedly fake Twitter profiles before they ever sent a tweet or interacted with anyone.

Is this Twitter sockpuppeting? You decide.

Businesses

Submission + - Natural Gas Fracking Causes Plunge in CO2 Emissions (examiner.com) 2

MarkWhittington writes: "Natural gas fracking, in which fluids are injected in a shale formation to force natural gas to the surface, has caused an economic boom in places such as the Eagle Ford formation in south Texas, according to CNBC. The natural gas fracking boom seems also to have fixed a situation that has vexed environmentalists, according to Investor’s Business Daily. The natural gas fracking boom has caused a plunge in CO2 output, down to 1990s levels."
Android

Submission + - Android Jelly Bean "Near Impossible" to Hack (arstechnica.com) 2

SternisheFan writes: "The latest release of Google's Android mobile operating system has finally been properly fortified with an industry-standard defense. It's designed to protect end users against hack attacks that install malware on handsets.

In an analysis published Monday, security researcher Jon Oberheide said Android version 4.1, aka Jelly Bean, is the first version of the Google-developed OS to properly implement a protection known as address space layout randomization. ASLR, as it's more often referred to, randomizes the memory locations for the library, stack, heap, and most other OS data structures. As a result, hackers who exploit memory corruption bugs that inevitably crop up in complex pieces of code are unable to know in advance where their malicious payloads will be loaded. When combined with a separate defense known as data execution prevention, ASLR can effectively neutralize such attacks."

Submission + - Caffeine Linked to Lower Skin Cancer Risk (go.com)

THE_WELL_HUNG_OYSTER writes: The curative effects of coffee continue to be discovered as the Harvard School of Public Health and Boston's Brigham & Women's Hospital published a new study today that links caffeine consumption with reduced skin cancer rates. Quoting:

    The study of nearly 113,000 men and women found those who drank three or more cups of coffee a day had a 20 percent lower risk of basal cell carcinoma than those who said no to Joe.

Caffeine in non-coffee substances was found equally effective. The cause is speculated to be related to caffeine's ability to "kill off damaged skin cells," said Dr. Josh Zeichner, assistant professor of dermatology at Mount Sinai Medical Center in New York. "If you get rid of these cells that are damaged, then they don't have the opportunity to grow and form cancers."

Data Storage

Submission + - New manufacturing technology enables vertical 3D transistors (extremetech.com)

MrSeb writes: "Applied Materials has taken the wraps off a new etching system meant to turn vertically stacked, three-dimensional transistors from lab experiments into commercial reality. The new Centura Avatar solves multiple problems facing manufacturers who are interested in 3D NAND but find their current equipment not up to the task of actually building it. According to the folks at Applied Materials, trying to build 3D NAND structures in real life would be like trying to dig a one-kilometer-deep, three-kilometer-long trench with walls exactly three meters apart, through interleaved rock strata — and that’s before we discuss gate trenches or the staircases. While this machine specifically targets 3D NAND today, a number of the challenges to scaling flash memory apply to scaling CPU logic as well. As for when 3D chips will be available for commercial purchase, Applied Materials was vague on that point, but personally I would expect to see companies adopting the new etch equipment in the next few years."
Power

Submission + - "Tin Whiskers" Could Triple the Capacity of Lithium-Ion Batteries (gizmag.com)

Zothecula writes: For over 60 years, electrical engineers have been trying to minimize the problem of tin whiskers. Growing on tin-plated electronics, the needle-like structures get up to ten millimeters long, and can cause short circuits. Instead of trying to eliminate them, however, Washington State University’s Prof. Grant Norton has been looking into ways of growing them – albeit in a controlled manner. His research has led to the creation of a tin battery anode, which he claims could triple the capacity of lithium-ion batteries.
Science

Submission + - Giant cosmic impact may have driven humans to farming (sciencedaily.com)

hessian writes: "These new data are the latest to strongly support the controversial Younger Dryas Boundary (YDB) hypothesis, which proposes that a cosmic impact occurred 12,900 years ago at the onset of an unusual cold climatic period called the Younger Dryas. This episode occurred at or close to the time of major extinction of the North American megafauna, including mammoths and giant ground sloths; and the disappearance of the prehistoric and widely distributed Clovis culture. The researchers' findings appear June 11 in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences."
Science

Submission + - DNA Modifications Change as We Age (sciencemag.org)

sciencehabit writes: As we age, the core of our biological being—the sequence of our DNA, which makes up our genes—remains the same. Yet recent research suggests that more subtle chemical changes to our DNA occur as we age. Now, a comparison of the DNA of a newborn baby with that of a centenarian shows that the scope of these changes can be dramatic, and they may help explain why our risk of cancer and other diseases increases as we get older.
Medicine

Submission + - Scientists discovered that a hidden vitamin in beer and milk may prevent obesity (medicaldaily.com)

An anonymous reader writes: Scientists have discovered that a hidden vitamin in beer and milk called the "miracle molecule" may prevent obesity.

A new study found that nicotinamide riboside (NR), a molecule found to indirectly influence the activity of cell metabolism, could play an important role in preventing weight gain and diabetes, improving muscular performance and providing other "extraordinary health benefits," according to a Switzerland-based research team.

Robotics

Submission + - Boeing hydrogen powered drone first flight. (suasnews.com)

garymortimer writes: "Phantom Eye’s innovative and environmentally responsible liquid-hydrogen propulsion system will allow the aircraft to stay on station for up to four days while providing persistent monitoring over large areas at a ceiling of up to 65,000 feet, creating only water as a byproduct. The demonstrator, with its 150-foot wingspan, is capable of carrying a 450-pound payload."
The Military

Submission + - Fire May Leave US Nuclear Sub Damaged Beyond Repair

Hugh Pickens writes writes: "AP reports that a fire that swept through a nuclear-powered submarine in dry dock at Portsmouth Naval Shipyard has caused such extensive extensive damage to its forward compartments that the 22-year-old Los Angeles class attack submarine might have to be scrapped. "These submarines were designed decades ago. So they're no longer state of the art," says analyst Loren Thompson. "If this vessel returns to service, I will be amazed." The fire broke out while the Miami was on a 20-month stay at the shipyard for an overhaul, and it took firefighters from more than a dozen agencies twelve hours to put out the fire, described as intense, smoky, and a "hot scary mess." "It takes a lot of guts to go into a burning building. But the idea of going into a submarine full of hot toxic smoke — that's real courage," said US Rep. Chellie Pingree after meeting with the shipyard commander. Firefighters isolated the flames so they would not spread to nuclear propulsion spaces at the rear of the submarine. There was nuclear fuel on board the sub, but the reactor has been shut down for two months and was unaffected. Rear Admiral Rick Breckenridge says an investigation has been launched into what caused the fire, but he expects that investigation to take a long time to complete and wouldn't say if human error has been ruled out as a cause of the fire, or if the focus is on mechanical issues."
Science

Submission + - MIT Study: Prolonged Low-level Radiation Damage Heals (mit.edu)

JSBiff writes: A new study from MIT scientists suggests that the guidelines governments use to determine when to evacuate people following a nuclear accident may be too conservative.

The study, led by Bevin Engelward and Jacquelyn Yanch and published in the journal Environmental Health Perspectives, found that when mice were exposed to radiation doses about 400 times greater than background levels for five weeks, no DNA damage could be detected.

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