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Comment: Re:The reason you haven't heard about it (Score 2) 207

by gloom (#39629985) Attached to: Demoscene: 64k Intros At Revision Demoparty

I'd say that the closest the US got to having "a demoparty like this" (meaning: with such good releases and turnout) was NVScene in 2008 which I helped organize. The event was documented in this now-severely-outdated blog, if you're interested in catching up: http://demotrip.blogspot.com/

+ - Monty Python to reunite for movie->

Submitted by dutchwhizzman
dutchwhizzman (817898) writes "The surviving members of Monty Python have announced they will make a new movie. It will be titled "Absolutely Anything". Graham Chapman won't be there to join them anymore, but they think the movie will still be in the spirit of "Life of Brian", "The meaning of Life" and other movies they made in the past."
Link to Original Source
Software

Knuth Got It Wrong 298

Posted by kdawson
from the to-be-or-not-to-be-heap dept.
davecb writes "Think you've mastered the art of server performance? Think again. Poul-Henning Kamp, in an article at ACM Queue, finds an off-by-ten error in btrees, because they fail to take virtual memory into account. And he solves the problem in the open source 'Varnish' HTTP accelerator, for all of us to see and use."

+ - Facebook launches experimental IPv6 site

Submitted by
Sesse
Sesse writes "At Google's IPv6 Implementors' Conference (currently ongoing), Facebook today announced the experimental (non-production) availability of www.v6.facebook.com, giving full access to Facebook properties on IPv6. (m.v6.facebook.com also exists, for mobile users lucky enough to have IPv6 connectivity.) As an extra bonus, Facebook decided to try out Locator/Identifier Separator Protocol (LISP), available at www.lisp6.facebook.com."

Comment: Re:Mac Issue Or IPv6 Issue? (Score 1) 204

by Sesse (#32109052) Attached to: Mac OS X Problem Puts Up a Block To IPv6

With regards to glibc, 2.3.6 is stone old. RFC 3484 support has matured a lot since Etch :-) Actually you need to go to Debian unstable to find a glibc that's patched to prefer NATed IPv4 over 6to4.

I think my rebuttal of your OS X analysis was a bit unclear, so let me try to make it a bit better. First of all, note that the sentence you're quoted does not mention 6to4 in any way. Second, note the part I wrote about “hits that come through”. The User-Agent is recorded every time the experiment is sent out, not only when it comes in. Thus, you can draw a direct correlation of OS X in the User-Agent string less likely to come back; your analysis was “browsers with Mac OS X in the User-Agent string are more commonly using 6to4 addresses”, which just isn't the same. (It's also true, of course, but the “OS X more often is broken” analysis doesn't depend on that at all.) If you did an experiment which only registered IPv6 hits that actually came through, your criticism would have been valid, but that's not how this was done.

/* Steinar */

Comment: Re:6to4 is unreliable (Score 1) 204

by Sesse (#32095570) Attached to: Mac OS X Problem Puts Up a Block To IPv6

Look at the page -- several Linux distributions (Fedora, Ubuntu, Gentoo, SuSE, Mandriva, Debian) now prefer IPv4 over 6to4 pretty unconditionally (unless you're trying to connect to a 6to4 host, but that's pretty obscure for a web server). The rest only prefer IPv4 over 6to4 when the IPv4 is not NAT-ed.

/* Steinar */

Comment: Re:Mac Issue Or IPv6 Issue? (Score 1) 204

by Sesse (#32095552) Attached to: Mac OS X Problem Puts Up a Block To IPv6

No, the reality is that getaddrinfo() on most platforms actually follow RFC3484 and prioritize IPv4 over 6to4. (There's a clear distinction in the RFC between 6to4 and other forms of IPv6.) OS X doesn't and uncritically tries IPv6 -- that is, of course, assuming you don't crash into any of the other resolver bugs they introduced in 10.5.

It should be said that if you follow RFC3484 to the letter, 6to4 will be preferred over NAT-ed IPv4. However, that was most likely just an oversight in the standard (the draft revision makes changes to fix that), and most vendors (certainly Microsoft, and most of the major Linux distros, although not glibc upstream yet) has made that change. However, this is moot with regards to OS X, since they don't actually seem to follow RFC3484 in the first place.

You are also wrong in the Airports are the only CPEs that try to enable 6to4 out of the box -- some Linksys models do this, among others. The Airports are, however, most likely the most common. You're also right in that uncritically enabling this is not a good idea; the CPE should at least have done a routability test first.

Finally, you're assuming the statistics here are based only on the User-Agent string on the dualstack hits that come through. They're not -- please read the experiment design more carefully. There is a direct correlation measured between using OS X (as seen in the User-Agent string that fetches the iframe) and inability to fetch the dualstack image. In no way does this result depend on correlation between OS X and 6to4.

/* Steinar */

Comment: Re:It would be nice if people read the standards.. (Score 1) 204

by Sesse (#32095514) Attached to: Mac OS X Problem Puts Up a Block To IPv6

Hi,

A few errors here:

  • The host has fully working IPv6 connectivity on the AAAA record it advertises. You could easily have checked this given the data in the report.
  • This is a 6to4, not 6over4, which is something completely different.
  • The 6bone has not existed for years.

/* Steinar */

Sun Microsystems

Scientists Need Volunteers To Look At the Sun 110

Posted by Soulskill
from the ow-that-hurts-it's-a-trap dept.
Hugh Pickens writes "BBC reports that Royal Observatory's 'Solar Stormwatch' needs volunteers to help scientists spot Sun storms — known as coronal mass ejections — before they cause damage on Earth. 'When you look up at the Sun obviously it's too bright to look at properly,' says Dr. Marek Kukula of the Royal Observatory, but 'with special instruments and telescopes you can see there's all sorts of stuff going on.' NASA already monitors the Sun using two 'STEREO' spacecraft that produce 3D images of earth's nearest star, which can show the trajectory of these explosions. However, the sheer amount of data means NASA's scientists are unable to analyze the data as closely as they need — which is where the world's Internet population comes in. After a brief tutorial, users get access to the actual 3-D images taken by the STEREO spacecraft. If a user believes they have spotted the beginnings of a solar storm, they can bring it to the attention of scientists. 'Every little bit counts,' says Kukula. 'I've spoken to the scientists involved and they all agree that even if you log-on and just do it for a few hours, get bored and never touch it again it's all really useful — and helps them to do their work.'"

Comment: Re:3D In Strategy Games (Score 1) 286

by snillfisk (#31436328) Attached to: An Early Look At <em>Civilization V</em>

Then you should really take a look at the games being published by Paradox Interactive. Classics such as the Europa Universalis-series and the Hearts of Iron-series are great strategy games. They're also publishing several other games in the same genre and I'd strongly suggest taking a closer look for games that play well and don't need a brand new gaming rig.

PC Games (Games)

An Early Look At Civilization V 286

Posted by Soulskill
from the new-and-shiny dept.
c0mpliant writes "IGN and Gamespot have each released a preview of the recently announced and eagerly awaited Civilization V. Apart from the obvious new hexagon shape of tiles and improved graphics, the articles go on to outline some of the major changes in the game, such as updated AI, new 'flavors' to world leaders, and a potentially game-changing, one-unit-per-tile system. No more will the stack of doom come to your city's doorsteps. Some features which will not be returning are religion and espionage. The removal of these two have sparked a frenzy of discussion on fan-related forums."

As in certain cults it is possible to kill a process if you know its true name. -- Ken Thompson and Dennis M. Ritchie

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