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Comment Re:No Compromises (Score 1) 147 147

I've never had a keyboard phone fail

A beer spilled on my Treo 650, killing a couple of keys. I was able to buy a replacement keyboard off a random eBay seller and swap it in without much trouble (after which the phone was as good as new), but it was an annoyance all the same.

I suspect a newer touchscreen phone would've been less vulnerable to that kind of failure. Can't say that I've tested the theory yet, even though I usually have a beer in one hand and my phone in the other (to log the beer) whenever a beerfest is on.

Comment Re:How about this... (Score 1) 184 184

H.265 is going to become the standard in the near future - not just for 4K (in which is will pretty much be the only solution) but for 1080p as well, since you get significantly higher quality (including 10 or 12 bit color

Any idea why they never did that with H.264? MPEG-2 offered 10-bit color. DVD and (I think) ATSC take advantage of it, and it makes a difference in scenes with large areas of slightly changing color (like a shot of the sky). That it wasn't available in H.264 (except maybe for some crazy-high profiles or levels not in regular use?) always seemed like a step back.

Comment Re:Don't try to piggyback on TrueCrypts popularity (Score 4, Informative) 114 114

If its Linux only don't present it as a successor to TrueCrypt. A very important feature of TrueCrypt is(was) that it targets Linux, Mac OS X and MS Windows. Any archive being available to any of the three platforms.

I don't know about Mac support, but if Tomb is just a wrapper around LUKS, the volumes it creates should be accessible on Windows as long as you use a filesystem Windows knows about. Ext2IFS doesn't work on anything newer than Windows Vista, so you're most likely looking at FAT32, exFAT, or NTFS if you want your LUKS volume to be portable.

Assuming a suitable LUKS volume, you can mount it on Windows with LibreCrypt, which is the successor to FreeOTFE (by way of DoxBox). My work machine still has FreeOTFE on it, but I just installed LibreCrypt on Windows 10 at home and the encrypted volume on my flashstick mounted right up.

Comment Re:Degrees are worth what you put into them (Score 2) 296 296

Getting a college degree, you actually learn something.

I've run into more than a few people who have made it through college quite uncontaminated by knowledge.

I'd argue that there are even some college curricula that will leave their students less prepared for the real world than if they had just gone straight into the burger-flipper and barista jobs that are the only types of work they'll ever land outside academia. You can identify most of them by the presence of the word "studies" at the end.

Comment Re:Question (Score 1) 114 114

The drivers in California aren't necessarily bad, but they are much more aggressive and more likely to do something stupid out of impatience.

California drivers never heard of lane discipline. They think nothing of (as Denis Leary might put it) "driving really slow in the ultra-fast lane," or of passing the aforementioned assholes on the right.

Comment Re:blu ray? (Score 1) 121 121

How is using blu ray cheaper than hard drives?

3 TB will fit on 120 25-GB BD-Rs. At 40 cents each, that's $48 in media costs. If you do like I do and reserve 20% for dvdisaster error-recovery data, you're still only looking at $60.

A 3 TB WD Green will set you back $95. (Want to spring for the NAS-rated Red drives instead? That'll be $119. Their absolute cheapest 3 TB hard drives are a couple of models from Seagate and Toshiba at $90 each.)

Comment Re:FB hardware may be lucrative... (Score 1) 121 121

The trick is getting BD media into the terabytes and getting it at a price point where it is decently affordable. For example, a 100 GB BDXL disk is $65, but it should be about 10% of that price in order to be a viable backup medium.

My last spindle of 25 GB BD-Rs cost me maybe $0.60 each or so. I could drive down to Fry's right now and pick up a spindle for about $0.80 each. A 4x increase in storage density isn't worth a two-order-of-magnitude increase in price. I would be surprised if Farcebook didn't arrive at the same conclusion.

Going by the numbers from the video in TFA, they're getting over 10k BD-Rs in a rack. While the basic concept isn't new, they appear to have developed it to a considerably higher density.

Comment Re:Base Stickers??? (Score 1) 843 843

ALL AF bases and the majority of the the other services did away with base stickers several years ago and now everyone in the vehicle over the age of 16 has to display a valid Government issued ID to get on base.

All? I'd swear last time I accompanied my father (retired AF) on base at either Nellis or Wright-Patterson, the skycop just asked for his ID, not mine. It might be different overseas, and it's been different here at various times in the past, but unless they've changed things yet again since this past December, they most likely only care about the driver's ID.

Comment Re:But Google Code? (Score 1) 44 44

any project or developer that uses it is going to need that backup repository at github anyway

You should have backups of all your projects to media that you control in any case. Google has a track record of winding down stuff it doesn't want to continue (Reader, anyone?), but if you're betting on any source-code repo to (1) not go tits-up (as Google Code might) and (2) not jump the shark (as SourceForge has), you're putting your code at risk. Git, in particular, makes it dead simple to clone a repo and all its history in a relatively compact form, so spare a few GB on a server you control for a mirror of everything you put on GitHub (or whatever).

"Everything should be made as simple as possible, but not simpler." -- Albert Einstein

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