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Comment: Re:So you know they're there (Score 1) 192

by nbucking (#32555368) Attached to: Tearing Apart a Hard-Sell Anti-Virus Ad
I do believe you are talking about Avast! antivirus (which is free). If set to its default settings it will say "virus database updated" it is neat at first (like having your own star trek ship computer!) and annoying later on. But I doubt it is there to scare anyone. I use Avast! because I grew up with McAfee and Symantec. They were terrible because they did the things you mentioned (slow your system to a crawl and made it impossible to uninstall the AV). I also got Avast! because it has the ability to check on 64 bit programs and most importantly it is FREE. I still work with Symantec at work (Air Force) but it has been pushed to the side and it is updated by a centralized AF AV server that rarely needs maintenance. The processing power has also increased to a point where I do not notice the background virus checks.

Comment: Re:Long Weekend (Score 1) 341

by nbucking (#29688901) Attached to: Microsoft Plans Largest-Ever Patch Tuesday
Easy just switch to a security access protocol that doesn't require a password. Like a common access card or fingerprints. You would still use pins (much easier then complex passwords) and it would be expensive (equipment wise) at first but think about the amount of time you would save. Plus it is much more secure since it also gives authentication as well as access. Passwords are extremely prone to social engineering.

Comment: Good network management (Score 1) 688

by nbucking (#29103851) Attached to: Suitable Naming Conventions For Workstations?
It depends if you are administrating a small company where you make the rules or a large company with directives. For a small company with only one site, naming your machine is worthless. But, for a large company with thousands of workstations and several sites (that have portable workstations moving between them) it helps to have a concise naming system. The best naming system is to have the first 2 letters be relevant to the site's name, then a simple 3 or 4 number account tracked by your supply depot, and the serial number or MAC address (if accounted for by supply) of the machine on the tail. This way you know (through a DNS/WINS lookup and a fancy network management tool like Cisco works) if a person from a different site connected to a port in your site or if a different account with your site decided to move to another part of your site. This is helpful if you need to track down a machine that is being bad even if it is off the network for a while. Good naming conventions are extremely important for good network management.

Comment: Re:yes and..? (Score 2, Insightful) 340

by nbucking (#28727277) Attached to: Australian Police Plan Wardriving Mission
Yeah but any good security+ certified IT professional knows that even a locked down wireless network is never completely secured. Like a car there are ways around a wireless security. I used to go out with a team and would crack networks of clients to see if they were updating and standardizing their encryption keys. It was rare that we cracked them but the fact that we did shows that even a secure network is never too secure. And there are always new vulnerabilities. So even if they warn you that is not an excuse to throw you in jail.
Privacy

Researchers Snag 60 TB of Everquest 2 Behavioral Data 66

Posted by Soulskill
from the only-59.9-TB-of-it-is-elf-roleplaying dept.
A group of researchers who went from game developer to game developer looking to acquire data for studying online social interaction got more than they bargained for. Sony Online Entertainment keeps extensive server logs of everything that happens within Everquest 2. When the researchers asked if there was anything they could look at, SOE was happy to share the entire EQ2 database — upwards of 60 TB — for their perusal. In addition to basic gender and age queries — who interacted with whom, and when — the scientists are also trying to find ways to track more subjective characteristics, such as performance, trust, and expertise. "To get estimates of them, the team is experimenting with trying to track physical proximity and direct interactions, such as when characters share experience from an in-game victory. To give a concrete example of the data's utility, Srivastava described how he could explore the phenomenon of customer churn, something that's significant for any sort of subscription-based service, like cell phones or cable TV. With the full dataset, the team can now track how individual customers dropping out of the game influenced others who they typically played or interacted with. Using this data, the spreading rate and influence factor could then be calculated, providing hard measures to work with."
Update: 2/18 at 21:04 by SS: Sony contacted us to set the record straight about the shared information. All information that could identify players was removed from the data given to the researchers. Chat logs were not shared at all. Read on for SOE's full statement.

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