Forgot your password?
typodupeerror

Comment: Not so fast (Score 1) 557

by nbahi15 (#46933167) Attached to: Actual Results of Crimean Secession Vote Leaked

Most people? What does that mean? My wife speaks Russian, her whole family speaks Russian and identify as Ukrainian. It seems that there is the danger here of conflating Russian speaking with I want to live in Russia. You're also suggesting the issue comes down to austerity vs. free money.

The truth is these people are largely poor, they live in the midst of a toxic media environment (most don't speak English), and the they are so inundated with propaganda from Russia that you can no longer determine what is truth and what is fiction inside the country. There is a strong feeling in Ukraine that they want to end corruption and move forward, possibly beyond the Russian sphere, but it is difficult to find that exit.

I would describe the whole EU association agreement as an attempt to hitch their wagon to a not-so-kleptocratic star. Austerity isn't the overriding concern, but in the case of the East right now people are being told the boogie man, AKA Nazi, neo-facists, are coming from the West to steal their children, rape their wives and generally ruin their day.

Comment: Dorm Rooms are not for study (Score 1) 561

by nbahi15 (#43180357) Attached to: Ask Slashdot: Best Way To Block Noise In a Dorm?

I found that as part of my daily routine was spending hours everyday in the main library. You find a quiet corner, preferably among a stack of non distracting books.

Routines are very good to have for people with focus issues. You get to your room, eat the gruel they serve in the cantina, and head off to the library with all your stuff. Work until 10-midnight, go home sleep. Wash-rinse-repeat.

Comment: Re:Wireless wire? (Score 1) 392

by nbahi15 (#43076783) Attached to: Apple's Lightning-to-HDMI Dongle Secretly Packed With ARM, Airplay

Nowhere near as much? Quantify, please.

On the contrary it isn't convoluted, it removes the complexity of the specific standard outside of the phone and essentially makes Lightning a future proof technology.

As posted in the comments of the blog by an AC:

Airplay is not involved in the operation of this adapter.

It is true that the kernel the adapter SoC boots is based off of XNU, but that’s where the similarities between iOS and the adapter firmware end. The firmware environment doesn’t even run launchd. There’s no shell in the image, there’s no utilities (analogous to what we used to call the “BSD Subsystem” in Mac OS X). It boots straight into a daemon designed to accept incoming data from the host device, decode that data stream, and output it through the A/V connectors. There’s a set of kernel modules that handle the low level data transfer and HDMI output, but that’s about it. I wish I could offer more details then this but I’m posting as AC for a damned good reason.

The reason why this adapter exists is because Lightning is simply not capable of streaming a “raw” HDMI signal across the cable. Lightning is a serial bus. There is no clever wire multiplexing involved. Contrary to the opinions presented in this thread, we didn’t do this to screw the customer. We did this to specifically shift the complexity of the “adapter” bit into the adapter itself, leaving the host hardware free of any concerns in regards to what was hanging off the other end of the Lightning cable. If you wanted to produce a Lightning adapter that offered something like a GPIB port (don’t laugh, I know some guys doing exactly this) on the other end, then the only support you need to implement on the iDevice is in software- not hardware. The GPIB adapter contains all the relevant Lightning -> GPIB circuitry.

It’s vastly the same thing with the HDMI adapter. Lightning doesn’t have anything to do with HDMI at all. Again, it’s just a high speed serial interface. Airplay uses a bunch of hardware h264 encoding technology that we’ve already got access to, so what happens here is that we use the same hardware to encode an output stream on the fly and fire it down the Lightning cable straight into the ARM SoC the guys at Panic discovered. Airplay itself (the network protocol) is NOT involved in this process. The encoded data is transferred as packetized data across the Lightning bus, where it is decoded by the ARM SoC and pushed out over HDMI.

This system essentially allows us to output to any device on the planet, irregardless of the endpoint bus (HDMI, DisplayPort, and any future inventions) by simply producing the relevant adapter that plugs into the Lightning port. Since the iOS device doesn’t care about the hardware hanging off the other end, you don’t need a new iPad or iPhone when a new A/V connector hits the market.

Certain people are aware that the quality could be better and others are working on it. For the time being, the quality was deemed to be suitably acceptable. Given the dynamic nature of the system (and the fact that the firmware is stored in RAM rather then ROM), updates **will** be made available as a part of future iOS updates. When this will happen I can’t say for anonymous reasons, but these concerns haven’t gone unnoticed.

MHL is an industry standard. And that is what the comment was referring to when mention a 'clever wire multiplexing.' The primary problem with it is that it isn't anywhere near universal and not even a standard in the sense there is agreement in implementation. The approach taken by Apple means they can support any standard that comes out in the future with a dongle and software update. This of course being very different than the replace your phone approach of Android.

Comment: Anonymous Coward posted this (Score 1) 392

by nbahi15 (#43066101) Attached to: Apple's Lightning-to-HDMI Dongle Secretly Packed With ARM, Airplay

An anonymous coward on Panic's blog posted this. They elude to that fact they work for Apple and have knowledge about this technology.

Airplay is not involved in the operation of this adapter.
It is true that the kernel the adapter SoC boots is based off of XNU, but that’s where the similarities between iOS and the adapter firmware end. The firmware environment doesn’t even run launchd. There’s no shell in the image, there’s no utilities (analogous to what we used to call the “BSD Subsystem” in Mac OS X). It boots straight into a daemon designed to accept incoming data from the host device, decode that data stream, and output it through the A/V connectors. There’s a set of kernel modules that handle the low level data transfer and HDMI output, but that’s about it. I wish I could offer more details then this but I’m posting as AC for a damned good reason.
The reason why this adapter exists is because Lightning is simply not capable of streaming a “raw” HDMI signal across the cable. Lightning is a serial bus. There is no clever wire multiplexing involved. Contrary to the opinions presented in this thread, we didn’t do this to screw the customer. We did this to specifically shift the complexity of the “adapter” bit into the adapter itself, leaving the host hardware free of any concerns in regards to what was hanging off the other end of the Lightning cable. If you wanted to produce a Lightning adapter that offered something like a GPIB port (don’t laugh, I know some guys doing exactly this) on the other end, then the only support you need to implement on the iDevice is in software- not hardware. The GPIB adapter contains all the relevant Lightning -> GPIB circuitry.
It’s vastly the same thing with the HDMI adapter. Lightning doesn’t have anything to do with HDMI at all. Again, it’s just a high speed serial interface. Airplay uses a bunch of hardware h264 encoding technology that we’ve already got access to, so what happens here is that we use the same hardware to encode an output stream on the fly and fire it down the Lightning cable straight into the ARM SoC the guys at Panic discovered. Airplay itself (the network protocol) is NOT involved in this process. The encoded data is transferred as packetized data across the Lightning bus, where it is decoded by the ARM SoC and pushed out over HDMI.
This system essentially allows us to output to any device on the planet, irregardless of the endpoint bus (HDMI, DisplayPort, and any future inventions) by simply producing the relevant adapter that plugs into the Lightning port. Since the iOS device doesn’t care about the hardware hanging off the other end, you don’t need a new iPad or iPhone when a new A/V connector hits the market.
Certain people are aware that the quality could be better and others are working on it. For the time being, the quality was deemed to be suitably acceptable. Given the dynamic nature of the system (and the fact that the firmware is stored in RAM rather then ROM), updates **will** be made available as a part of future iOS updates. When this will happen I can’t say for anonymous reasons, but these concerns haven’t gone unnoticed.

Comment: Re:Wireless wire? (Score 1) 392

by nbahi15 (#43065885) Attached to: Apple's Lightning-to-HDMI Dongle Secretly Packed With ARM, Airplay

The 30-pin connector has lag. I can attest to that.

So if it worked with 1080p would the SoC solution still be convoluted? Will it still be convoluted if the next iOS software update (something that happens in the world of iOS) resolves the issue?

The alternative to this would be something akin to the MHL standard. However, that standard is new and is not anywhere close to universal. Even the adherents aren't controversy free. Samsung 3 Port controversy The Apple adapter, while clearly not outputting 1080p at this moment, should work on any TV with an HDMI connector without requiring a specs check.

Comment: Re:Wireless wire? (Score 1) 392

by nbahi15 (#43065871) Attached to: Apple's Lightning-to-HDMI Dongle Secretly Packed With ARM, Airplay

I'm sorry but even the most basic search "HDMI latency" will lead you to a myriad of forums on AV and the problems associated with HDMI latency. The issue with a lot of these technologies is that they are billed as a simple trouble free solutions. However, reality is far from it.

I can give you a quick example PS3, the game Guitarsmith, and a Samsung 7 series from 2011. Definite audio lag over pure HDMI. This is such a serious problem that the game even displays a series of different lag remedies every time it starts. Next thing you know you are buying an optical audio cable...

Comment: Re:That is certainly one way to look at it (Score 1) 392

by nbahi15 (#43065827) Attached to: Apple's Lightning-to-HDMI Dongle Secretly Packed With ARM, Airplay

I personally have filed bugs with Apple before regarding problems in the iOS SDK. As an example, a bug regarding Attributed Text strings leaking, but a work around was found and I received a response. Summary of response: "It does leak and we will fix it. No timeframe for when it will be ready."

So in the case I had an iPad 4 and a Digital AV adapter to test with, I would verify, document the steps to reproduce and submit.

The specs for the Original 30-pin adapter which I can verify are accurate:

Use the Apple Digital AV Adapter to mirror whatever’s on your iPad or iPhone 4S screen — apps, presentations, websites, and more — on your HDTV or HDMI-compatible display in up to 1080p HD (movies play at up to 720p).
Watch slideshows and movies on the big screen in up to 720p by connecting your iPad, iPhone 4, or iPod touch (4th generation) to an HDTV or HDMI-compatible display.
The Apple Digital AV Adapter routes digital audio to screens that support it.
Connect the Apple Digital AV Adapter to your iPad, iPhone 4, iPhone 4S, or iPod touch (4th generation) via the 30-pin dock connector and to your HDMI-compatible display using an HDMI cable (sold separately).
A second 30-pin connector built into the AV adapter lets you charge and sync your device while it’s connected to your HDMI-compatible display.

The specs for the Lightning adapter:

Use the Lightning Digital AV Adapter with your iPad with Retina display, iPad mini, iPhone 5, and iPod touch (5th generation) with Lightning connector. The Lightning Digital AV Adapter supports mirroring of what is displayed on your device screen — including apps, presentations, websites, slideshows, and more — to your HDMI-equipped TV, display, projector, or other compatible display in up to 1080p HD.
It also outputs video content — movies, TV shows, captured video — to your big screen in up to 1080p HD. Simply attach the Lightning Digital AV Adapter to the Lightning connector on your device and then to your TV or projector via an HDMI cable (sold separately).

Based upon this, I would say that Panic has in fact discovered a bug. The adapter is rated without qualification for 1080p.

Comment: Re:Wireless wire? (Score -1, Redundant) 392

by nbahi15 (#43056923) Attached to: Apple's Lightning-to-HDMI Dongle Secretly Packed With ARM, Airplay

Let's start with HDMI. What a complete pile of shit. Sync issues, audio/video latency, cable quality issues. I will concede HDMI is superior to the technologies that required half a dozen RCA connectors or separate audio and video connectors, but are we really acting like HDMI is some sort of perfect technology? I have spent far too much time screwing with overscan and lip sync issues for games or movies that just make me want to throw my Smart TV out the window.

So Apple comes out with a connector that seems to be pretty amazing. They pipe the data to a chip and everything magically works. There are some limitations possibly, although at this point it could still be just a bug, but otherwise it works for those people that for whatever reason absolutely need a cabled connection. Many offices these days are putting Apple TVs up, so I have no need within our conference rooms or at my house for a cabled video connection, but I might still buy one of these if I'm at a customer site and the projector happens to support HDMI. It would be very nice if this adapter supported uncompressed 1080p and it might very well, we just don't know. I'm guessing it is a bug.

That said, what is the use case for tethering an iPad to your TV and requiring zero latency? Do we call this the Real Racing 3 requirement? That seems to be what we are talking about here, the case where an iPad is a Wii U, and that seems fairly minor. I believe that the connector and Airplay will always have too much latency for that kind of gaming, but I'm willing to be amazed. Even if it has too much latency for gaming I don't think many people are going to find this to be a show stopper.

Comment: That is certainly one way to look at it (Score 4, Insightful) 392

by nbahi15 (#43056741) Attached to: Apple's Lightning-to-HDMI Dongle Secretly Packed With ARM, Airplay

Fact: Apple has an ARM processor in the cable. It is fair to assume the video is processed by the chip in the cable.

The rest of the facts in this case are just speculation:
* Is design a 'limitation', or a design choice?
* Is the 1600x900 output seen by Panic a Panic problem or an Apple one? Is it a bug or a limitation of the hardware? File a bug and find out
* Is the connector providing Airplay over the 6cm cable? Pure speculation. Sounds plausible, even clever, but that is just a guess.

It seems to me that there is certainly an interesting story in this adapter, but I don't think we know what that story is yet.

Comment: Re:Vulnerabilities (Score 2) 272

by nbahi15 (#43012575) Attached to: iOS 6.1.3 Beta 2 Patches evasi0n Jailbreak

And if this was hammer and you wanted to use it as a screwdriver or paper weight, fine. However, this is a device sold not as hardware, but an experience. You were not intended to modify it to do unsanctioned things. Period. If decide to take a hammer to the device to modify it into a paper weight that is your prerogative. If your belief is that Apple should support your conversion to a paper weight by making sure the device cracks in a pleasing way and when it doesn't bitch about it, that is your issue, not Apple's.

Let's also take this ownership claim and the sorry state of the American cellphone industry. You don't buy your cellphone in all likelihood and certainly not historically. You get a phone at least partially owned by the company that gave it to you under the terms of a multi-year contract. If you want a clear ownership situation you need to change the relationship between subscriber and carrier to be one in which they exclusively provide the connectivity and if anything deliver a phone via a payment plan with a clear endpoint.

Comment: Require that the carriers provide itemization (Score 1) 416

by nbahi15 (#42749125) Attached to: What You Can Do About the Phone Unlocking Fiasco

What you need is a requirement to list the phone bill separately from the phone.

February Service Plan XXL - $80
Phone payment - $20
Total: - $100

Amount of time remaining on contract - 5 months
Payoff amount for phone - $100

After the phone is paid off the monthly bill would then drop to $80 and no contract. The phone itself should then be unlocked at the completion of the payment plan.

Comment: Re:Get over the petitions already (Score 1) 416

by nbahi15 (#42749089) Attached to: What You Can Do About the Phone Unlocking Fiasco

I'm guessing you haven't written many letters or made many phone calls to your representatives. Petitions are quite valuable, especially ones that receive responses from the administration. There are very few avenues for grassroots activism that can elicit a response from the president of the US and this administration has created that avenue.

Comment: Taking the petition a bit further (Score 1) 416

by nbahi15 (#42748203) Attached to: What You Can Do About the Phone Unlocking Fiasco

Technological limitations on unlocking your phone aren't the only questionable business practices of cellular providers. I think we need both legalized unlocking, better billing practices, and limitations on the contracts. That is why I put together http://wh.gov/y6kK. Please take a moment to sign it. Body text follows:

Customers of cellular phone plans in the US are treated poorly. We would like to see regulations that require things like:

1) A bill that reflects the advertised price, and separate line items that show the cost of the phone plan and the phone.

2) A bill that shows the cost of the phone purchased and how much of the phone has been paid off

3) Upon completion of a contract the customer has the right to have any technological restrictions removed that prevent its use on other carriers networks.

4) The right to buy out the phone and terminate the contract at any time.

5) A limit to the terms of contracts allowed.

6) The right to buy a 3rd party phone and join a carriers network with no contractual obligations.

+ - Petition to Modernize US Banking

Submitted by
nbahi15
nbahi15 writes "Our banking system is a playground for fraud and the overall experience is ripe for revolution. Some classic examples of how fundamentally flawed the US banking system include Don Knuth reward checks ending in 2008 because simply seeing the MICR code at the bottom was enough for people to generate fraudulent checks and cause problems for his bank. Many people in the US have been personally effected by having fraudulent transactions against their credit cards, stolen or forged checks, and the high cost of doing business through existing banks. So I have petitioned the Obama administration to comment on the possibility of some meaningful improvements to todays banking system. It would be great to get Slashdotter's opinions about how the US banking system could be improved and get to the 25000 votes necessary to get an official response."

"Morality is one thing. Ratings are everything." - A Network 23 executive on "Max Headroom"

Working...