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Comment Re:And? (Score 1) 199

A lot of things come at no cost though. I find it amazing how many people for example will spend a fortune on their graphics card, motherboard, processor, ram, hard drives, etc... but then run it with a cheapo power supply.

Let's say that you're one of those (probably the majority) that leaves their computer on 24/7. Let's say your gaming computer's average power consumption, between idling and heavy usage, is maybe 200W. Let's say the power supply lasts an average 3 years. Let's say that the difference between a cheapo 75% efficient power supply and an excellent 95% efficient supply is $50. Then the better supply saves 40W on average, or 1051 kWh over its lifespan. At an average US electricity price of, what, 12 cents per kWh, that's a savings of $126. You not only help the environment, but you easily save yourself money.

It's not just power supplies that matter - the same logic can be applied to processors, graphics cards, and other hardware as well. Always check the power consumption - not just for the environment, but for your pocketbook as well. Often it saves money to spend more upfront.

Comment Re:Not far enough. (Score 1) 77

IMHO, countries that care about pollution should set up a Pollution-Added Tax (PAT), equivalent to VAT, replacing their current patchwork of pollution regulations. Since VAT is already clearly in compliance with WTO rules (given that it exists), PAT should be as well. Just like how VAT works by taxing products at each stage of adding value to them during manufacture, PAT would tax them by the embodied pollution in their manufacture during that stage (plus any "delayed" pollution released when the product is consumed). And like VAT, PAT goods for export would receive a full tax rebate, and goods for import from non-PAT states would be taxed on entry.

The main point is that states with weaker pollution regulations cannot gain an unfair economic advantage over states with stronger pollution regulations. Thus it encourages even non-member-states to tighten their regulations.

Comment Re:Sanctioning NSA/FBI for spying all? (Score 2) 77

Things like Stuxnet is not at all what the person was talking about. They're talking about hacks to try to embarrass people or steal corporate secrets. Stuxnet was to take down a nuclear program, which is clearly a geopolitical, not industrial, goal.

My personal opinion: countries breaking into each other's governments or trying in general to gather/use classic "spying" data for geopolitical purposes is fair game. State-sponsored industrial espionage is not. That said, even in the first case, one runs the risk of uncontrolled escalation, so it's important for all sides to keep themselves in check and mutually agree to ratchet down the activity from time to time, for everyone's sake.

Also: it probably hasn't gotten past the US that it's in an advantageous state right now. Russia hasn't been more vulnerable in a long time, and now even China's star has taken a pounding in the market. US industry is benefiting from cheap thermal energy prices due to low cost shale gas. And Europe is probably going to be on the US's side in all of this.

Comment Re:Pascal? (Score 1) 426

Modula-2!

I had only bought my brand new Mac SE at the time I visited the Montreal Mac Club where the owners of Metcom introduced their new Metcom Modula-2. Only reference I could find is a MacGUI announcement dated '88.

Metcom would later rebrand as Metroworks and the M2 compiler/IDE would grow to become the famed CodeWarrior dev environment that completely took over Mac development at the switch to PPC, because Apple's MPW was lacking in support of their own architecture (Oh! the sweet revenge that was ProjectBuilder).

I still have the original Metcom Modula-2 binders and the rebranded Metroworks Modula-2 hard-cover bound books (the yellow series). Out of nostalgia, I crack the books open once in a while. The smell bring back memories. I shipped a few apps in M-2.

Comment Re:"Denali" = anagram for "Denial" (Score 1) 385

I don't have a very clean way - I usually do egrep "^......$" /usr/share/dict/words (with the number of dots matching the length of the word) and then pipe it into a series of other greps - for example for two "r"s I'd do egrep -i "r.*r" while for one d I'd just use grep -i "d". There's probably a better way.

Comment Re:For me, it will always remain the mountain... (Score 4, Interesting) 385

I can't remember who it was... it might have been Halldór Laxnes... who said that a piece of nature isn't really a piece of nature unless it doesn't have a name. That is, the first thing people do once they start interacting with an object or place is to give it a name, and so once something is named it starts to become about the history of people rather than the history of the land itself. And that if you want to establish a real connection with nature, you don't go sit on top of that well-known named peak that people climb... you go to that little nameless stream or that remote nameless cliff or whatnot - places which tell only their own story.

After any salary raise, you will have less money at the end of the month than you did before.

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