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Comment: Re:LOL ... w00t? (Score 1) 291

by nabsltd (#48653075) Attached to: Amazon "Suppresses" Book With Too Many Hyphens

Apparently there's hyphen, en-dash, and em-dash and the text of the book does indeed use the en-dash...and looks a little weird.

There's actually a lot more than just those, some of which render identically in most fonts.

I ran into a eBook that uses the n-dash correctly when used a a modifier for compound words, and it does look weird (which is what alerted me to it in the first place), but after reading the rules, I left them that way.

Comment: Re:LOL ... w00t? (Score 1) 291

by nabsltd (#48653041) Attached to: Amazon "Suppresses" Book With Too Many Hyphens

There is nothing simple about typography, and a script such as you describe would cause more damage than it would fix.

In this case, the script would be simple, since the book isn't about math. Replace all U+2212 characters with U+002D and you've fixed the problem that Amazon has with the book.

Although U+2010 is called "Hyphen" and U+002D is called "Hyphen-Minus", either works in this case, with U+002D the most common.

Comment: Re: fire them (Score 0) 110

by nabsltd (#48628611) Attached to: Hackers Compromise ICANN, Access Zone File Data System

Incoming SMTP ports should never accept email from it's own domain.

As you can see from his post, his server did not accept an e-mail "from it's own domain":

Replies were sent to the Return-Path: header that is not in our domain.

"Return-Path" is an SMTP header generated by the MTA based on the what it received in the envelope. It's generally only created by an intermediate internal server that forwarded e-mail, thus changing the "From:" envelope address.

And, even a perfectly configured MTA that rejects any "From:" envelope address that is in a domain for which the MTA is an MX still can't stop phishers from forging the "From:" header, which is just part of the body of the e-mail. Unfortunately, the envelope address usually never gets to the MUA, so an e-mail can look like it's legitimately from an internal source. If you use an MUA like Outlook that hides all the technical info, it's easy to be fooled.

Comment: Re:Nope. That's not what happened here... (Score 1) 159

by nabsltd (#48625837) Attached to: To Fight Currency Mismatches, Steam Adding Region Locking to PC Games

All Steam did is wall off a handful of regions where the local currencies are extremely volatile, and even then ONLY for accounts gifting games to one another between the rest of the world and these tiny regions.

And, I believe the gifting restriction is only for purchases using real money.

Right now, Steam has promotion where you get "tokens" (for lack of a better term) from game achievements and can use those to buy games. Those tokens have the same value in all regions, so if you buy a game with tokens, you can gift it to anyone else, regardless of any gifting restrictions on purchased games.

Comment: Re:What is the problem here? (Score 2) 137

by nabsltd (#48610347) Attached to: Microsoft Gets Industry Support Against US Search Of Data In Ireland

The order isn't against any person or entity in Ireland. It is against a US company, and US employees, who can access the data from their desks in the US. Under US law, it is certainly a valid order.

Actually, it likely is not.

A warrant is only applicable to people/places within the jurisdiction of the court that issued the warrant. Microsoft Ireland (which stores the data but does not technically own or control it) and various Irish citizens (who own/control the data) are not under jurisdiction of any US court.

As a subpoena, it's not possible for any Microsoft US employee to comply, because a subpoena only forces you to turn over data/items/evidence that you own/possess...it cannot ask you to turn over items that you do not (otherwise, the government could hand anybody on the street a subpoena to walk into someone's house to gather evidence). No Microsoft US employee owns/possesses the data in question, and whether they have access is not important. What Microsoft needs to do is find somebody in the US who does have legal access to the data and issue them a subpoena.

Comment: Re:sync unintuitive (Score 1) 233

by nabsltd (#48584211) Attached to: Ford Ditches Microsoft Partnership On Sync, Goes With QNX

I can attest to the unintuitive nature of the settings on the Sync system. Pairing your Bluetooth device is indeed a challenge.

They must have regressed something, as the 2011 Sync is easy.

The "Phone" screen has a "Devices" button, and you click "Add", then have your phone scan. Enter the PIN from the car on the phone, and you're paired.

Comment: Re:Doesn't matter even if the publishers win... (Score 1) 699

by nabsltd (#48558183) Attached to: French Publishers Prepare Lawsuit Against Adblock Plus

One of the keys to the ABP filters is that it isn't just a list of hosts, but rather a list of regexes that describe ads.

And, responding to my own post, I just used a feature of Adblock Plus that allows you to block ads based on where they point (i.e., the "href" value in the "a" tag).

This means you could do things like block ads for "badsite.example.com" but allow ads for "goodsite.example.com" regardless of what URL is used to retrieve the actual ad. There is no way to do this with any source-DNS based blocking (like a hosts file).

Comment: Re:Legal Opinion, Please? (Score 1) 699

by nabsltd (#48550057) Attached to: French Publishers Prepare Lawsuit Against Adblock Plus

Fourth option. The website owner sells actual products at their website and makes money that way. This works if the website is an actual store

...or XKCD, or The Daily WTF, or Techdirt, or.... Some of these sites have sponsorship or the occasional ad, but nothing like any of the sites that complain because they detect an ad blocker.

There are lots of sites where being a "store" isn't the primary purpose of the site, but they make money by having a store selling things associated with the website.

Comment: Re:Doesn't matter even if the publishers win... (Score 2) 699

by nabsltd (#48549965) Attached to: French Publishers Prepare Lawsuit Against Adblock Plus

that's a giant list, so you'd instead need a GIANT HOSTS FILE

One of the keys to the ABP filters is that it isn't just a list of hosts, but rather a list of regexes that describe ads. This allows you to display actual content from a site without displaying the ads.

Comment: Re:Have the Germans threaten to invade (Score 1) 699

by nabsltd (#48549861) Attached to: French Publishers Prepare Lawsuit Against Adblock Plus

No, I live in America, and never felt in any way constrained by any part of the Patriot Act.

That's because you haven't seen the effects directly, yet. Once the investigation is further along, you'll see how badly your rights are going to get trampled on.

What's that...you say you've never done anything to warrant investigation? That's exactly the same as many of the people on the No Fly List. And, you're not one of the nearly 10 million US citizens who are three steps away from a "selector"? So far, then, you've been lucky.

Comment: Re:Every 30 days. (Score 1) 247

by nabsltd (#48530137) Attached to: Ask Slashdot: Convincing My Company To Stop Using Passwords?

4: You have to remember which way you displaced your hands. Also, john and crack both have rules for that.

Rules/mutations/whatever in password crackers don't increase their chance of a hit if the base password isn't in their dictionary.

Even so, the "slide" trick adds two bits of entropy to the password.

The first time, it's a KLUDGE! The second, a trick. Later, it's a well-established technique! -- Mike Broido, Intermetrics

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