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Comment: Re:So? (Score 1) 175

by n1ywb (#48018895) Attached to: When Everything Works Like Your Cell Phone
Your victrola is probably an exceptional outlyer. It's remarkable because it's so old and still works. Nevermind the million other busted victrolas in the landfill. I've gone through plenty of old stuff that was busted and not worth fixing for any practical reason. Old does not necessarily equal good. Sure manufacturing quality of consumer goods is hit or miss but that's nothing new either. You think nobody sold junk 100 years ago? Yeah right.

Comment: All that's old is new again (Score 1) 175

by n1ywb (#48018853) Attached to: When Everything Works Like Your Cell Phone

It wasn't very long ago that; guess what? NOBODY owned their telephone! That's right, you RENTED it from the phone company! In fact it was ILLEGAL to third party phone. In fact some people STILL RENT their phone. Their ROTARY land line phone.

http://usatoday30.usatoday.com/news/offbeat/2006-09-14-phone_x.htm

Funny how quickly people forget. As they say in china, there's nothing new under the sun.

Comment: The tipping point (Score 2) 147

by n1ywb (#48003771) Attached to: PostgreSQL Outperforms MongoDB In New Round of Tests
My understanding is that it's easy to spread READ ONLY postgres load accross multiple servers. WRITING is a bottleneck with postgresql though because it enforces consistency, while other DBs like couch kick the consistency can down the road to the application. But I haven't seriously looked into it in years.
Robotics

Robot Dramas: Autonomous Machines In the Limelight On Stage and In Society 31

Posted by Soulskill
from the if-only-asimov-was-around-to-see-it dept.
aarondubrow writes: We're entering an era where we'll increasingly coexist with robots and other intelligent machines — some of which may look like us. Not only is there a growing number of industrial robots (about 1.5 million today), there are 10 million Roombas in our homes, porter-bots in our hospitals and hotels, social robots in our nursing homes and even robot spectators at baseball games in Japan, tele-operated by remote fans.

Theater is not an arena that we typically associate with robots, however, artists, musicians and producers are often early adopters and innovative users of emerging technologies. In fact, robots got their name from the 1920 play, R.U.R., by the Czech playwright, Karel Capek. An article in the Huffington Post describes a panel discussion at the National Academy of Science in June that featured the producers of three recent plays that starred robots. The plays highlight our robot anxieties, while offering new visions for human-robot interactions in the future.

Comment: Re:Maybe your logic is wrong...Like insanely wrong (Score 1) 83

by n1ywb (#47774299) Attached to: $33 Firefox Phone Launched In India

The ignorance of people is astonishing.

FIFY. I've been around the world and in my experience people from other countries know as little about the USA as people from the USA know about other countries. Also America is a pair of continents, not a country. Canada, Mexica, and Brazil are all in "America".

Comment: Re:Cyber is easy, EMP is possible (Score 1) 117

by n1ywb (#47751045) Attached to: Securing the US Electrical Grid

Because Canada is tilted more towards the sun than we are, they are more susceptible.

O_o

Canada is tilted about as far away from the sun as populated areas on earth get. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/T...

Canada is more susceptible because they are closer to the north pole where charged solar particles are drawn in by the earth's magnetic field. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/A...

Comment: Notes on Programming in C by Rob Pike (Score 1) 352

by n1ywb (#47005797) Attached to: Ask Slashdot: What Should Every Programmer Read?
Word for word this short essay served to improve my coding more than any other document, and not just in C. Most of the essay is applicable to any language. Pike elegently and concisely explains the most important principles of good code style and software architecture. The sections "Programming with data" and "Function pointers" are particularly sailent. The section "Complexity", also known as "Rob's Rules", is outstanding and ought to be burned into the brain of every software developer. It's a free online classic and I'm surprised it hasn't been mentioned yet. http://www.lysator.liu.se/c/pi...

It appears that PL/I (and its dialects) is, or will be, the most widely used higher level language for systems programming. -- J. Sammet

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