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Submission + - Italy Approves 'Google Tax' on Internet Companies

recoiledsnake writes: Italy’s Parliament today passed a new measure on web advertising, the so-called “Google tax,” which will require Italian companies to purchase their Internet ads from locally registered companies, instead of from units based in havens such as Ireland, Luxembourg and Bermuda. Google, for example, says that it sells nearly all its advertising in Europe from an Irish unit, leaving little taxable profits in the countries where its customers are based. That unit in turn pays royalties to a second Irish subsidiary, which says its headquarters are in Bermuda. Google last year moved nearly $12 billion to the Bermuda unit, the majority of its worldwide income, cutting more than $2 billion off its global income tax bill. Google’s Italian unit last year reported total income taxes of just 1.8 million euros, corporate filings show.

Submission + - Twitter boots critic of NBC for tweeting exec's email address (networkworld.com)

netbuzz writes: "Is a corporate workplace email address “non-public” and “personal?” The question arises after Guy Adams, a Los Angeles-based correspondent for The Independent of London, had his Twitter account suspended today, allegedly for having violated a Twitter privacy policy when he tweeted the workplace email address of an NBC Sports executive. The Internet is abuzz with accusations – no make that assumptions – that Twitter muzzled Adams because Adams was tweeting up a storm of protest over NBC’s coverage of the Games. However, Twitter says it was because it prohibits the tweeting of “non-public, personal email addresses.” Whether Adams did that or not appears debatable."

Submission + - First Look: Microsoft Office 2013 (infoworld.com) 1

snydeq writes: "Ever since the first beta editions of Windows 8 appeared, rumors have circulated over how Microsoft would revamp its other flagship consumer product, Office, to be all the more useful in the new OS. Would Office become touch-oriented and Metro-centric, to the exclusion of plain old Windows users? A first look at Office 2013 provides the short answer: No. 'Office 2013 has clearly been revised to work that much better in Windows 8 and on touch-centric devices, but the vast majority of its functionality remains in place. The changes made are mostly cosmetic — a way to bring the Metro look to Office for users of versions of Windows other than 8. Further, Office 2013 has been designed to integrate more closely with online storage and services (mainly Microsoft's), although those are thankfully optional and not mandatory.'"

Submission + - Apple fires developer who discovered security hold (cnet.com) 2

Meshach writes: Security researcher Security researcher Charlie Miller recently discovered a security hole in iOS software. To test the feature, Miller released a generic stock-checking app called InstaStock that could tap into his own server and grab bits of code to show that it worked. But according to Apple this violates the ToS of his contract and he has been fired.

Submission + - kernel.org compromized (kernel.org) 2

JoeF writes: There is a note posted on the main kernel.org page, that kernel.org has been compromised earlier this month:
"Earlier this month, a number of servers in the kernel.org infrastructure were compromised. We discovered this August 28th. While we currently believe that the source code repositories were unaffected, we are in the process of verifying this and taking steps to enhance security across the kernel.org infrastructure."

The note goes on to say that it is unlikely to have affected the source code repositories, due to the nature of git.


Submission + - Apple Claims Samsung and Motorola Patent Monopoly (dailytech.com)

esocid writes: Apple lawyers are crying foul about Samsung, and the recent Google's acquisition of Motorola's allegedly "anticompetitive," use of patents. Apparently Apple is irate about these companies' countersuits, which rely largely on patents covering wireless communications, many of which are governed by the "fair, reasonable and non-discriminatory" (F/RAND) principle, as they were developed as part of industry standards. Apple takes issue with the fact that Motorola in its countersuit declines to differentiate the 7 F/RAND patents in its 18 patent collection. Regardless of what Florian Mueller says, it's hard to dispute that the "rules" of F/RAND are largely community dictated and ambiguous.
Florian Meuller also states that Motorola's patents won't help Android, and thinks Samsung is still a copycat.

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