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Comment Re:Hillary has... been opposed to single payer (Score 1) 18

You have to understand a few things about the Left:
(1) They think lesser beings (e.g. conservatives) are just so much meat.
(2) They reject any sort of absolute truth, irrespective of whether that includes a religious dimension.
(3) They will always argue the present tense, and only admit to a past which positively supports their argument, or attacks their opponent. No 'precedent' matters, especially if already airbrushed via (2).

Comment You better fix your unicode characters (Score 1) 1

You better fix your unicode characters, or fustakrakich will offer you a tut-tut.
With respect to the JE, read the book of Acts. Rubio is regurgitating Peter in front of the Sanhedrin when they explained, regarding this Jesus figure: "Shut up."
You're not going to get anything different out of Cruz, for that matter. Trump is nominally a Presbyterian, but I wouldn't rely on him.
The Progressive Faith is at odds with any orthodox member of an Abrahamic faith. The optimal answer is for politics to avoid setting itself in conflict with faith, and there are reasonable compromises to achieve this.

Google Scours 1.2 Million URLs To Conform With EU's "Right To Be Forgotten" Law (engadget.com) 61

An anonymous reader writes: According to a Google report the company has evaluated 1,234,092 URLs from 348,085 requests since the EU's May 2014 "right to be forgotten" ruling, and has removed 42% of those URLs. Engadget reports: "To show how it comes to its decisions, the company shared some of the requests it received and its decisions. For example: a private citizen that was convicted of a serious crime, but had that conviction overturned during appeal, had search results about the crime removed. Meanwhile a high ranking public official in Hungary failed to get the results squelched of a decades-old criminal conviction. Of course, that doesn't mean the system is perfect and the company has already been accused of making mistakes."
User Journal

Journal Journal: Astute Article on the Turkey/Russia Kerfuffle 2

A Necessary Conversation

The clash between the Turkish Air Force and Russia is dangerous because it violates the first rule of proxy warfare which is principals don't fight principals. The whole point of proxy warfare is that only the seconds are allowed to cross swords. The duelists are forbidden from engaging each other directly, a convention intended to limit the scope of war.

Comment Re:W.C. Fields Does Politics (Score 1) 7

The whole Bill Cosby takedown should be instructive. When Gloria Allred and a phalanx of bimbos arrive with 88 miles of innuendo, the resulting reality show will make Charlie Sheen look like Billy Graham.
(Was I all over the map there, or what?)

Comment Re:Why do you insist on misquoting me? (Score 1) 81

I was reacting to "Some of your favorite (by message and JE count) conspiracies are of things that haven't happened at all. . ." but I really just can't quit laughing at your mindless cheerleading efforts. We've reached the point where it's not worth attempting to discuss anything at all. Which, possibly, has been your aim all along.

Comment Re:W.C. Fields Does Politics (Score 1) 7

Again, it's a question of ownership. Just like I suspect someone has a J.S. McCain file dating to his Keating Five days, so too I expect there is substantial dirt that will, at a surprising time, blow the bogus hairstyle right off Trump.

Comment Re:W.C. Fields Does Politics (Score 1) 7

I suspect you'll find he's fairly formidable against Clinton

Check the weather forecast, and see if it won't be raining knives in Trumps area at some point. Guy with that many decades in business has GOT to be an oppo goldmine.


Engineers Nine Times More Likely Than Expected To Become Terrorists (washingtonpost.com) 470

HughPickens.com writes: Henry Farrel writes in the Washington Post that there's a group of people who appear to be somewhat prone to violent extremism: Engineers. They are nine times more likely to be terrorists than you would expect by chance. In a forthcoming book, Engineers of Jihad, published by Princeton University Press, Diego Gambetta and Steffen Hertog provide a new theory explaining why engineers seem unusually prone to become involved in terrorist organizations. They say it's caused by the way engineers think about the world. Survey data indicates engineering faculty at universities are far more likely to be conservative than people with other degrees, and far more likely to be religious. They are seven times as likely to be both religious and conservative as social scientists. Gambetta and Hertog speculate that engineers combine these political predilections with a marked preference towards finding clearcut answers.

Gambetta and Hertog suggest that this mindset combines with frustrated expectations in many Middle Eastern and North African countries (PDF), and among many migrant populations, where people with engineering backgrounds have difficulty in realizing their ambitions for good and socially valued jobs. This explains why there are relatively few radical Islamists with engineering backgrounds in Saudi Arabia (where they can easily find good employment) and why engineers were more prone to become left-wing radicals in Turkey and Iran.

Some people might argue that terrorist groups want to recruit engineers because engineers have valuable technical skills that might be helpful, such as in making bombs. This seems plausible – but it doesn't seem to be true. Terrorist organizations don't seem to recruit people because of their technical skills, but because they seem trustworthy and they don't actually need many people with engineering skills. "Bomb-making and the technical stuff that is done in most groups is performed by very few people (PDF), so you don't need, if you have a large group, 40 or 50 percent engineers," says Hertog. "You just need a few guys to put together the bombs. So the scale of the overrepresentation, especially in the larger groups is not easily explained."

One picture is worth 128K words.