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Submission + - US court strikes down media swearing ban (

mysidia writes: A federal appeals court in Manhattan struck down a policy of the FCC which banned broadcasters from allowing curse words on live TV. The court concluded the rule was unconstitutionally vague and had a chilling effect on broadcasters. In the 2 to 1 ruling, the court found that policy was "arbitrary and capricious", but that the FCC might be able to craft a policy that does not violate the First Amendment.

"'By prohibiting all `patently offensive' references to sex, sexual organs and excretion without giving adequate guidance as to what 'patently offensive' means, the FCC effectively chills speech, because broadcasters have no way of knowing what the FCC will find offensive,' the appeals court wrote."

Fox Stations, owned by News Corp., and other networks had brought suit in 2006 after the FCC cited use of profanity during the airing of awards programs.

Free Net TV Threatens Telecoms 116

An anonymous reader writes "C|Net's running an article about the threat free television on the internet poses to traditional telecoms and cable companies." From the article: "No one is expecting Internet television to cannibalize traditional TV models overnight. Despite advancements in streaming technology, video delivered on the Web can still be choppy, with frequent interruptions as data packets buffer and reload on the screen. In fact many viewers who watched the NCAA tournament aired by CBS on the Internet last month complained about the network being overloaded."

Adding features does not necessarily increase functionality -- it just makes the manuals thicker.