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Comment: Re:Why so much fuss? (Score 1) 140

by mysidia (#47942819) Attached to: Dealership Commentator: Tesla's Going To Win In Every State

Because dealer franchise agreements give individual dealers a defined geographical area in which they are the only sales outlet for that particular model. And that contract language is difficult for manufacturers to break*. Tesla had no such agreements in place.

Well, if it doesn't suit them, they'll likely just revise the language, or allow the agreement to end at its expiration date, and terminate the contracts; if they don't suit the manufacturer.

Comment: Re:So everything is protected by a 4 digit passcod (Score 1) 471

by mysidia (#47942591) Attached to: Apple Will No Longer Unlock Most iPhones, iPads For Police

This. Hardware specific keys are the killer for any forensic attempt. It makes breaking a copied image totally impossible

Apple obviously has an image that is not locked to specific hardware, when you take a backup. As it's possible to restore to a different device!

The law can just send Apple an order to deliver THAT version of the image.

Comment: Re:Procedures only work when you follow them. (Score 1) 471

by mysidia (#47942575) Attached to: Apple Will No Longer Unlock Most iPhones, iPads For Police

You can restore that from iCloud (or wherever you stashed the backup if it ain't an iPhone) one would think, then punch in the passcode once that's done.

Then law enforcement can get a warrant drafted to order Apple to hand over a copy of the backup image and instructions to decrypt it, assuming they discover the passphrase.

So much for "wipe after 10 attempts"

Comment: Re:So everything is protected by a 4 digit passcod (Score 1) 471

by mysidia (#47942541) Attached to: Apple Will No Longer Unlock Most iPhones, iPads For Police

How does a copy of a drive image wipe itself after any number of failed attempts?

Ideally, if the actual key encrypted with the passcode is stored on a tamper-resistant hardware chip, so the "image" will not contain a vital hardware element needed to produce the actual key.

And 10 failed attempts results in the chip memory contents being "zapped"

Comment: They should increase the number of 'canaries' (Score 2) 199

by mysidia (#47942395) Attached to: Apple's "Warrant Canary" Has Died

Instead of providing just one global canary.... more canaries, so the identity of which canaries were withdrawn, could be used to help ascertain the nature of the request(s) received.

They should also provide each user their own 'custom' canary.

For example: an option to receive every month, every quarter, every week, or every day, a personalized canary statement that "Apple has never received an order under Section 215 of the USA Patriot Act which included information related to your account records. We would expect to challenge such an order if served on us."

Comment: Re:I never thought I'd say this... (Score 1) 304

by mysidia (#47936827) Attached to: FCC Chairman: Americans Shouldn't Subsidize Internet Service Under 10Mbps

Yes.... I just wish they'd make it a "graduated" scale and tier the subsidy. 10 megabits complete build-out and availability to all prospective customers over at least 1 square mile - Subsidies capped to mb+contiguous miles 1 to 10% of maximum.

20 megabits complete build-out and availability to all prospective customers over at least 10 contiguous square miles - 11 to 20% of the maximum (for that area).

30 megabits complete build-out and availability to all prospective customers over at over at least 20 contiguous square miles - 21 to 30% of the maximum (for that area).

40 megabits complete build-out availability to all prospective customers over at over at least over at least 30 contiguous square miles - 31 to 40% of the maximum (for that area).

50 megabits complete build-out availability to all prospective customers over at over at least over at least 50 contiguous square miles - 41 to 50% of the maximum (for that area)

60 megabits complete build-out availability to all prospective customers over at over at least over at least 60 contiguous square miles - 51 to 60% of the maximum (for that area)

70 megabits complete build-out availability to all prospective customers over at over at least over at least 70 contiguous square miles - 61 to 70% of the maximum (for that area)

80 megabits complete build-out availability to all prospective customers over at over at least over at least 75 contiguous square miles - 71 to 80% of the maximum (for that area)

90 megabits complete build-out availability to all prospective customers over at over at least over at least 80 contiguous square miles - 81 to 90% of the maximum (for that area)

100 megabits complete build-out availability to all prospective customers over at over at least over at least 85 contiguous square miles - 91 to 100% of the maximum (for that area)

Comment: Re:just prepay for food (Score 2) 230

by mysidia (#47903447) Attached to: School Installs Biometric Fingerprint System For Cafeteria

It's a function of education to keep kids alive, not to mention focused.

No... it's not at all. The function of education is to educate kids.

Their parents have a responsibility to see that their kids are fed and their health requirements are met.

The school should simply eliminate all the POS crap and require parents to pay.

Failure to pay will the a disciplinary infraction against the parent; the student may be suspended, and child protective services may be contacted.

There is no right to care for a child, if you are not capable of doing so.

Comment: Re:Not about ease, about authority (Score 1) 230

by mysidia (#47903427) Attached to: School Installs Biometric Fingerprint System For Cafeteria

What if the cafeteria worker is having a bad day and decides to point at the wrong kid, draining money from the wrong account to punish the bad kid's parents?

I like what my school did like 22 years ago. The "POS" is at the entrance to the Cafeteria.... Going into the Cafeteria, the students lined up in a specific order. She knows who is supposed to be next, you just tell lunch lady your last name and 4 digit code, and you get checked off as present.

You get a standard lunch. The only extras you can buy are a second milk, or a dessert bar, which you can't buy until about 20 minutes after lunch started, and in order to get one of those, you pay cash.

Comment: Re:LOL (Score 1) 213

by mysidia (#47899017) Attached to: Congress Can't Make Asteroid Mining Legal (But It's Trying, Anyway)

I think once they have found minerals, they will set up a permanent operation there. When they take off; it will be to bring one shipment back to where they could market it, however: people and assets would remain in the area, and it would be controlled, and it would likely be continuing to mine until the next wave of freight carriers come by to pick up the next shipment.

Comment: Re:LOL (Score 1) 213

by mysidia (#47895933) Attached to: Congress Can't Make Asteroid Mining Legal (But It's Trying, Anyway)

But I personally don't see any issues with this. Whoever gets the stuff out should own it.

As long as that stuff doesn't come from my tracts of land on the Moon, Mars, etc, claimed through the Lunar embassy.

And if they do extract resource from unauthorized mines on my land, then I would be entitled to the value of 100% of the raw resources extracted.

Comment: Re:... and back again. (Score 1) 245

by mysidia (#47895891) Attached to: City of Turin To Switch From Windows To Linux and Save 6M Euros

Are you seriously trying to claim Office 2013 in Windows 8 is radically different? And that its not that much different than Linux

Yes. Windows 8's new user interface "boot to metro", "push apps first and foremost," and "deprecate the desktop" is a radical departure from Windows XP / Windows 7. The metro is the new UI experience, and there is no sidestepping it.

It has caused extremely poor adoption of Windows 8 as users are sticking with Windows XP and 7 instead. Even XP users who acknowledge the need to upgrade are moving to 7, not Windows 8.

Also, KDE's UI much more closely resembles Windows XP / 7's UI than Windows 8 does.

You might have a point about file format compatibility with regards to LibreOffice vs MS Office. However...... Ms Office is becoming more rarely used.

At that point, the file format incompatibility with Office's non-standard format becomes moot.

Comment: Re:Can we please cann these companies what they ar (Score 0) 288

by mysidia (#47895325) Attached to: California Declares Carpooling Via Ride-Share Services Illegal

Thats a good idea, make hail illegal. Can they do the same with straightline winds and tornados too?

Restricting who can accept a street hail and requiring licensing is how the taxis protect their business. "Private transport companies", where you call for a ride in advance, are in a different category of business.

Comment: Re:Who would have thought (Score 1) 194

by mysidia (#47894355) Attached to: The Documents From Google's First DMV Test In Nevada

and then suddenly the car will see something it can't handle and... stop in the middle of the highway

The issues were in city driving, and they are situations Google knows the car can't handle, so they agreed in advance with the state that a human would pilot the vehicle through these obstacles.

Highway driving tends to be "easier" in terms of fewer obstacles --- but yeah, if there's an unmapped stoplight or road construction site, the vehicle might have difficulties ----- it turns out, that in such areas, usually a lower speed limit is posted and normal highway speeds are not advisable or legal.

"An open mind has but one disadvantage: it collects dirt." -- a saying at RPI

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