Become a fan of Slashdot on Facebook

 



Forgot your password?
typodupeerror

Slashdot videos: Now with more Slashdot!

  • View

  • Discuss

  • Share

We've improved Slashdot's video section; now you can view our video interviews, product close-ups and site visits with all the usual Slashdot options to comment, share, etc. No more walled garden! It's a work in progress -- we hope you'll check it out (Learn more about the recent updates).

×

Comment: Re:Risk Management (Score 1) 724

by myowntrueself (#49345529) Attached to: Germanwings Plane Crash Was No Accident

The thing is, this really is a freak occurance. So many flights, every single day, over every single city. People need to piss and shit, its simple biology. Every time someone goes for a piss break, someone else needs to be called in? That is just silly and insulting to the people involved.

In the grand scheme of things to worry about, this isn't really one of them. Its ridiculous to feel we need new regulations every time something happens...the next tragedy will always happen. It is inevitable.

There are daipers for this kind of thing. They are good enough for astronauts, should be good enough for airline pilots.

Comment: Re:False Flag Plots.... (Score 1) 202

by myowntrueself (#49327221) Attached to: Leaked Snowden Docs Show Canada's "False Flag" Operations

In the long run, it can definitely make Canada safer. Prohibiting this behavior means that we won't do stupid shit that will cause even more enemies.to appear. The number of threats that the Anglosphere faces that we didn't create ourselves is incredibly small.

I've lived in 3 Anglosphere countries and 2 non-Anglosphere countries. I'm a native English speaker from the UK.

Having experienced life outside the Anglosphere I'm puzzled why it is that virtually all the English speaking nations are so fucking retarded in so many ways. Its not just the dumbass self-defeating 'espionage' its also the amazing pedantry, prudishness, squeamishness etc, the obsession with poop jokes. Almost all the adults in these cultures seem, by external standards, to be like large schoolchildren.

I've also lived outside the angloshpere, every single nation has huge glaring problems that people simply ignore because it's part of their culture.

There's no real way to say which one is better, both have their advantages and drawbacks. You may be able to get away with more things in Thailand than the UK, but in Thailand you'll always be a second class citizen, accepted only because you have enough money to live there without working. Any fight between you and a Thai will result in the Thai winning regardless of what actually happens. If you want to live in Asia, you'll have to get used to the corruption, nepotism, tiered society, face, blood money and a lot of other things we would consider uncivilised in Anglo countries.

Believe me, I know all that and have experienced it first hand.

What seems strange to me is the way that its so consistent across English speaking cultures. Maybe its an emergent property of the English language?

Comment: Re:False Flag Plots.... (Score 2) 202

by myowntrueself (#49323619) Attached to: Leaked Snowden Docs Show Canada's "False Flag" Operations

In the long run, it can definitely make Canada safer. Prohibiting this behavior means that we won't do stupid shit that will cause even more enemies.to appear. The number of threats that the Anglosphere faces that we didn't create ourselves is incredibly small.

I've lived in 3 Anglosphere countries and 2 non-Anglosphere countries. I'm a native English speaker from the UK.

Having experienced life outside the Anglosphere I'm puzzled why it is that virtually all the English speaking nations are so fucking retarded in so many ways. Its not just the dumbass self-defeating 'espionage' its also the amazing pedantry, prudishness, squeamishness etc, the obsession with poop jokes. Almost all the adults in these cultures seem, by external standards, to be like large schoolchildren.

Comment: Re:Your government at work (Score 2, Insightful) 332

you really hold an organization like ISIS and the US Govt on the same moral equivalency?

i don't care how much you hate the USA, you fail the ability of coherent thought if you think the USA and ISIS are morally the same

I wasn't claiming moral equivalence, just behavioral equivalence. The USA is run by a completely amoral group of people for whom human life has little value. I'll say the same about ISIS. Since I'm talking about amoral people its hardly a matter of 'moral equivalence'. Its not like I'm giving it a number and saying they are both at the same level of morality. They don't even have NO morality. They see themselves as operating at a meta-level above morality.

Comment: Re:Gee whiz (Score 1) 332

If your enemy is in an unassailable position you have two choices; infiltrate and kill them in their sleep or attack something outside their fortress which they must come out to defend. Though I would think that the most obvious targets for the infiltration would be the drone 'pilots' families, people they do business with, people who make them burgers, people they owe money to, people who owe them money.

Comment: Re:Careful, they might shoot back (Score 3, Insightful) 332

From a group that made its name slaughtering helpless civilians, I wouldn't expect a whole lot of guile.

I'm confused and not properly following this thread. Are you saying ISIS or the US military have made their names slaughtering helpless civilians?

Or both?

Comment: Re:meanwhile (Score 2) 342

by myowntrueself (#49284899) Attached to: UK Chancellor Confirms Introduction of 'Google Tax'

Those with smaller incomes must use a larger proportion of it on consumption.

10% is 10% no matter what the purchase price is, the Proportions are the same.

The only way where they get out of balance is where corporations can purchase larger quantity and get a lower sale price per unit then the smaller consumer for a given item.. So you will not be removing the buying power element, but even then you are capturing the taxes and doing it based on money changing hands.

What they could do is like in some 3rd world countries where 'rich people' (usually foreigners) pay more when they go to the shops!

The 'white face tax' really does exist; I'd get my wife (a local) to go get prices then I'd go along to the shop for the same product and be asked 10x the price she was asked. (Then I'd set her on them and she'd tear them a new orifice where no orifice existed before.)

Comment: Re:Aren't these already compromised cards? (Score 1) 269

by myowntrueself (#49276971) Attached to: Fraud Rampant In Apple Pay

Look, it is one of those apple fans who talk about apple's "war chest" like it is a badge of honour to overpay for a device to fund said war chest (which by the way is overseas to avoid taxes).

I'm such an Apple fanboi that I can't wait for the Apple game console whose controller will have one button.

Comment: Re: Aren't these already compromised cards? (Score 1) 269

by myowntrueself (#49276959) Attached to: Fraud Rampant In Apple Pay

I see, so it IS okay for Apple to strong arm banks into doing things Apple's way, provided Apple's way meets your standard. Funny that.

I mean obviously this is a foul up and both the banks and Apple should work to fix it, they're BOTH responsible. The idea that banks are just helpless ninnies at the mercy of Apple, forced to conduct their business exactly as Apple demands, is dumbass.

Wait... Apple is responsible?!?!?

Comment: Re: Aren't these already compromised cards? (Score 1) 269

by myowntrueself (#49276193) Attached to: Fraud Rampant In Apple Pay

Geez, if Apple told you to jump off a cliff, you have to, right? I mean they have "such a large war chest."

At a certain point surely the responsibility of bankers to keep their customers' accounts secure entails-- it's the very basis of their profession.

and anyway, what exactly are they afraid of? Did they even ask to implement the necessary security features? Did they ask, and did Apple refuse? Has Apple threatened any sort of sanctions against banks that don't comply? It's all very amorphous, and again, seems to rely on the idea that bankers have minimal accountability or responsibility, and may respond to undefined, mysterious, and unsubstantiated "fears" without basis.

I would have hoped that a company as prestigious as Apple would have demanded a higher standard of security from the credit card companies and banks and forced them to be more scrupulous. After all Apple customers have so much more to lose from fraud, being so much more wealthy than the rest of us unwashed masses who must make do with PCs and Android phones.

Comment: Re:Simplicity? (Score 1) 269

by myowntrueself (#49276151) Attached to: Fraud Rampant In Apple Pay

In the states, we current use magnetic stripe for physical transactions. The "security" offered is in signature. I hate it, it's dumb, it's getting fixed supposedly, but it is what it is for now.

For us, Apple Pay means not having to extract a card, and with Touch ID it offers a somewhat real level of physical security as well.

There was a guy documenting how he was signing with things like "transaction invalid" and "no not honor" and the shops weren't even checking.

Comment: Re:Fees and fraud prevention procedures (Score 1) 269

by myowntrueself (#49275181) Attached to: Fraud Rampant In Apple Pay

Apple Pay is simply going to get too expensive for all but the most clueless merchants to use, both from the fraud and from Apple's eventual fees.

Anything Apple might charge will be a rounding error compared to the 3-5% the credit card companies charge merchants. Furthermore those fees get passed on to the customers so merchants only give a shit if their competition doesn't have to pay the same fees.

Regarding the fraud, it sounds like the banks aren't following their own security procedures which results in... duh, fraud.

Apple will probably charge 30%

The beer-cooled computer does not harm the ozone layer. -- John M. Ford, a.k.a. Dr. Mike

Working...