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Comment: Re:Hmmm (Score 1) 2 2

Somebody gave me "flamebait", carelessly ignoring the carbon footprint of the label.

But go ahead, tell us how this site is all overrun by "leftist fascists". Tell me enough times and I might even tell you where the next reptoid meeting is.

Possibly you could explain how you thought the scope of my verses was limited to /.
I very much had the Agenda 21 Aristocracy in mind while considering the rhymes.

Comment: Preening Progressive Prius Pricks (Score 4, Insightful) 250 250

Preening Progressive Prius pricks
Verbally hurl stones & sticks
But my old diesel's paid & plucky
Does the job while economy sucky

Guess they'll have to pass a law
Prying key from cold, dead paw
Don't need green overlords smug
Bossing about as the fascist thug

Comment: That was the funniest part to me (Score 1) 124 124

The claim that Sweden would hand him over to the US. Were I to worry about anyone in the EU doing that, it would be the UK. The US and UK have a relationship literally called the "special relationship." They back each other on diplomatic and intelligence matters in a way rarely seen among other nations. So they would be the one I would peg to hand him over all quiet like, if anyone.

Comment: Sorry but no (Score 1) 124 124

The UK courts heard the matter, all the way to the top, and decided that it was a valid request. Your opinion on that doesn't particularly matter, only the opinion of their courts. That is how it works in any case of a nation which has an extradition treaty with another nation: The courts of the nation being asked to extradite decide if said request is allowable per the treaty. What that requires varies treaty by treaty.

In the EU, the extradition treaties are pretty strong. Countries don't have a lot of choice to say no. If a fellow EU member asks and the paperwork is all in order, you more or less have to comply. That is precisely what the British courts found in this case. They reviewed it, found it valid, he appealed, they found it valid and so on.

Doesn't matter if you don't like it, that is how the justice process works there. This was not a case that was handled in some shady back channel matter, it went through the court system properly and the rulings fell against him. That's all there is to it.

Comment: Sweden's case won't really matter (Score 4, Informative) 124 124

The UK now has a case against him, and a very strong one. He fled bail, and that is a crime. That crime is still ongoing since he's still fleeing said bail. So they can arrest and charge him for that. Doesn't matter if the original matter is log dropped, he is still on the hook for this.

That's the thing with court dates, bail, and all that jazz: Even if the case against you was going to be dismissed, if you skip bail you are now guilty of another crime. You have agreed to appear in court and a failure to do so is against the law.

The UK had no beef in this originally, they were just acting on an EU arrest warrant. Sweden said "We want this guy," the UK looked at the warrant and said "looks valid per the treaty" and thus arrested him. They had no interest or ability to decide on the validity of the charges, only if the request required them to act per treaty. It did so he was arrested, and then released on bail.

He challenged the extradition all the way up to the high UK court, but the courts found it was a valid request that the UK had to honour. Nothing to do with his guilt, just that the request was a valid one and they were bound by treaty to hand him over. Had he gone to Sweden then, that would have been the end of the UK's involvement. His bail would be returned and the UK would have no further interest in what happened.

However he fled rather than handing himself over. So at that point, he became a fugitive in the UK. They now have a case against him. It is totally separate from the original case, it is simply a case of skipping bail.

Likely they'll want to act on it too, since he's been flaunting it in their face for years.

Comment: Re:Why can't this be the law everywhere? (Score 1) 191 191

"Allegations of police misconduct and widespread false arrests could not be verified by reporters because arrest records in cases where charges are ultimately dropped were made private in 2015."

The real answer is to make the original records easily viewable on an official government web site, but mandate that "CHARGES DROPPED" or "NOT GUILTY" or some other exculpatory language clearly appear whenever they are viewed.

Also helpful: fewer laws and fewer police. Every action and inaction doesn't need to be regulated and policed by petty government officials. Save the policing for theft and violence and let us otherwise live our lives as we choose.

By working faithfully eight hours a day, you may eventually get to be boss and work twelve. -- Robert Frost

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