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Submission + - Obama admin opposing copyright exception for blind ( 1

esme writes: Over at Boing Boing, there's a scoop on the Obama administration joining with other western countries to block a treaty that would create international standards for copyright exceptions for the blind and others who need technology to read. Activists at the WIPO negotiations are trying to get the word out that lobbying from publishers has caused the US, Canada, the EU, Australia, New Zealand, the Vatican and Norway to oppose the treaty.

Submission + - Doctors Scan Photo ID for Treatment (

Sherri Davidoff writes: "Spurred by the FTC's "Red Flags Rule," more health care clinics are requiring photo identification and storing high-resolution copies in their computer systems. Ironically, this probably puts patients at greater risk of identity theft, not less. From the article: "Walking into the doctor's office, I was surprised to see a new sign which read: 'Red Flag Identity Theft Rule: We are now required by law to ask for a Photo ID at the time of each visit. Please have your Photo ID ready for the receptionist to scan.' As an avid bicyclist, I wasn't carrying a driver's license. 'I'm sorry, we'll have to reschedule you,' said the receptionist.

"Everyone should have access to medical care- not just people who have registered with the government and obtained a photo ID. Furthermore, patients should have the right to health care without being forced to give up control of our personal information. As a patient, I don't really want a copy of my Photo ID stored on a crappy unpatched Windows box at my doctor's office. Today's patients do not even have the right to know how well doctor's offices and hospitals are secured, even in the face of constant reports of medical data breaches. That's sick.""


Submission + - Wallpaper upload site faces DMCA trademark claim

Free Culture News writes: "Desktop Nexus, a wallpaper sharing site that you might recall was threatened by Toyota over user-created wallpapers a while ago, has received a trademark claim under the DMCA. Hanson Beverage Company, through the firm Continental Enterprises, sent Desktop Nexus a DMCA notice about wallpaper featuring Monster Energy Drink. After a second notification and a list of three more wallpapers flagged by the company for removal, Desktop Nexus removed the wallpapers. Before the second notice, Desktop Nexus asked for clarification on what actions the company was to take, as the original claim was not clear. The reply, which came after the removal of the wallpapers, claimed that trademark law, not copyright law, was the rationale for removal. The legality of this move is quite questionable, given that the DMCA is designed to deal with copyright infringement and not trademark infringement."

"Spock, did you see the looks on their faces?" "Yes, Captain, a sort of vacant contentment."