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Comment: Austerity fails again (Score 1) 197 197

It doesn't help that Greece was forced into an austerity plan in their last bailout. Essentially that kicked off a death spiral. Austerity has already been well discredited (see here, here, and here. Original paper here) yet it keeps being foisted off on citizens everywhere.

I'm not suggesting that Greece should spend money like a drunken sailor on leave, but following a faith based economic theory even after it has been disproven (even to the satisfaction of the writers of the original paper) is not the answer.

Comment: Re:Slippery slope (Score 1) 260 260

I'll tell you up-front that I do believe in a God and that this God is the uncaused cause that set everything else into motion. As this is a personal belief, it won't have much to do with my response to you, but I thought I'd mention it to add some perspective. By "personal belief", I mean "go form your own". I for one cannot stand the mindless group-think experience of most churches I've visited and the "security" of being surrounded by the like-minded is worthless. I think Big Questions like "is there a God?" are things you have to decide for yourself.

OK. I find the belief in unfounded god/s is one of the leading causes of murder, rape and mutilation etc throughout history. It has also repeatedly held humanity's progress back and tend to be non-democratic and unreasonable in nature having no place in schools or modern life in general.

The massive mainstream religions have become like a corrupt government. They served a purpose and provided people something they felt they needed, but various control freaks long ago realized they can also be used to control people. Like Jim Marrs says, religion and the monetary system are the two major methods of controlling people. This doesn't mean that currency of some kind has no legitimate use (barter has lots of problems) and it likewise doesn't mean that religion can only control people.

I mean, I've read the Bible. I'm not an expert, but I can say that I'm well familiar with it, specifically the words of Jesus Christ. When I read the words attributed to him, I see exhortations to be humble, to love your neighbor as you love yourself, the importance of forgiveness, turn the other cheek, etc. I've read multiple translations and they all agree on this point. I just can't find any teaching of Jesus that can be construed as "murder, rape, torture, etc are all perfectly acceptable". Those calling themselves Christian and claiming to have read the same Bible should have observed the same.

I argue that if there was a god he/she/it would not need any believers nor would he need them to be offended to defend his/her/its name or honour.

The actual concern for this comes from the idea that the Creator wants to have a relationship with the created, rather than just watch us like an aquarium or snow globe. It's also believed that people have an inherent longing for such a connection and don't have a full life without it.

The perversion used to control people is this idea that you must behave a certain way and become a certain typecast sort of person or else you're faulty in some serious way. It's just a way to enforce conformity, not in a "top-down" way but in such a way that the conformists themselves would feel ashamed to appear otherwise.

I've also argued to more than one religious person, that I doubt a term like "god dammit" would actually offend any serious God-concept. It seems like a childish position to me, to envision God as some sort of scolding parent. I know human beings who wouldn't actually be offended by terms they dislike; why should Almighty God be more petty than they? It just makes no sense to me.

If I believe, wholly and deeply in divine pink unicorns a legislation demanding that others respect such an unfounded belief would be an insult.

If you also had multiple witnesses providing written accounts of this, and said unicorns performed what appeared to be miracles in front of large crowds, and many people found this convincing and credible, well then you might be onto something.

The very questioning of belief is repeatedly a cause to offend some. After all, the only unforgivable sin is to deny the holy spirit, should such a spirit exist in the unlikely event that spirits become factual.

My own concept of God includes a desire for us to question everything worthwhile, and this certainly qualifies. Einstein said "the most incomprehensible thing about the universe is that it is comprehensible". I personally wouldn't want to create mindless robots with no sense of awe or mystery, no genuinely satisfying curiosity; they would never reach their full potential. If I can see what would be direly wrong with that, I assume a being infinitely more advanced than myself can also see this.

If by "unforgivable sin" you refer to Mark 3:22-30 and Matthew 12:31-32, this refers to permanently rejecting the Holy Spirit. In the context of Mark 3:22-30 the Pharisees tried to falsely attribute Jesus's powers to Satan ("ruler of the demons"). This represents a conscious rejection, a misunderstanding so profound that its bearer actively resists truth, even when it happens in front of them. It's the idea of someone seeing an act of God and calling it evil. In many matters not involving religion, this is how psychotic people operate: they've convinced themselves that the wrong thing to do is expedient, justified, expected, etc and therefore good ("greater good" is a common one).

Like Bill Hicks mentioned, I personally suspect that we are God's way of experiencing Itself subjectively. That would make questioning, reasoning, and personal refinement all the more important.

Not exactly a front-page story anymore, but when I read your post, it got me thinking.

Comment: Re:Americans setting off fireworks... snicker (Score 1) 40 40

That was not a normal M1000. It was clearly (badly) hand made or modified. I know this because I used to make fireworks as a hobby until the ATF started hiking it's skirt up and doing the mousey dance every time someone sneezed.

This is an actual M-1000.The message is clear, don't set off fireworks on the patio furniture.

Some of the ones I made might BARELY qualify as a small bomb but those involved 4 oz. of black powder and a well reinforced tube.

You should note that commercial fireworks are mortar shells, not skyrockets.

Now, how many times has your house burned down in all of that? How many skyrockets in your windows?

I can understand you not wanting it daily for months, but surely on the actual holidays it might be nice to not get all bunched up over it.

Comment: Re:Why can't this be the law everywhere? (Score 1) 248 248

Even in "at will" states, there are so many other employment protection laws that firing people for no cause is extremely legally risky

Excuses are dirt cheap. As long as the firing can be plausibly claimed not to be motivated by racial or gender discrimination, it's not much problem. Examples seen in the wild include "not meshing with the workplace culture", "poor attitude", "not a good fit for the job", "cutbacks", etc.

And that's not even including the tactic of creating so many workplace rules that pretty much every employee will routinely violate one or more of them (and at the manager's discretion, be forgiven).

Comment: Re:Why can't this be the law everywhere? (Score 1) 248 248

Bald assertions aren't very convincing, sorry. I might as well reply that the moon is made of cheese. There is a cost in the sense that a replacement will need time to get up to speed, but any other costs are self-inflicted damage.

Comment: Re:Americans setting off fireworks... snicker (Score 1) 40 40

OMG you must tremble for hours every time a car backfires! A skyrocket through a window? I have NEVER heard of such a thing happening. Unless you mean an open and unscreened window.

Many people in my neighborhood shoot fireworks every year on the 4th and there has never been a fire.

Your description of a firecracker as a "small bomb" tells me you are permanently set to "overreact".

Comment: Re:Hold them liable (Score 4, Insightful) 95 95

Strenuously disagree. This is more than a billing error here, it is an implicit threat of expensive legal action wrapped in a takedown that at the least interferes with someone's free expression. They need to take it seriously or go away.

Civilization has long understood the dangers of crying wolf and even has a number of fables about it in order to teach young children not to do it.

They are welcome to use their algorithm as a screening test, but they shouldn't be claiming ownership of things without human verification. Since their algorithm must have some 'idea' what it thinks the work is, it should only take a few seconds per filing to have a human verify that what is playing is what the algorithm thinks it is.

Perhaps the ban on the easy method of making a claim should expire after a time, but the message is fairly clear: If they prove they are unable to responsibly use a largely automated system, they will be forced to do it manually in order to force them to consider each case more carefully. It may even be acceptable to grant them 3 strikes rather than 1, but only if they issue a personal (hand written) apology from their CEO to the person they wrongly claimed against.

+ - FBI wants Pirate Bay logs for criminal investigation into copyright trolls.->

the simurgh writes: It has been revealed today that In the past few months, two of the Pirate Bay co-founders have been repeatedly questioned by Swedish authorities, acting on behalf of the FBI. the internet now has clear evidence that Prenda is indeed being investigated by the US Government for uploading their own copyrighted content in torrents placed onto The Pirate Bay, for the sole purpose of creating a honeypot trap to sue over pirated downloads. the full story is included in the link below
Link to Original Source

"May the forces of evil become confused on the way to your house." -- George Carlin

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