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Comment: Re:It is coming... On Weekends... From Home... (Score 1) 157

by mtippett (#49515849) Attached to: Why the Journey To IPv6 Is Still the Road Less Traveled

If your router enables IPv6, your devices have IPv6 access - no endpoint changes necessary. Current versions of most Operating Systems actually prefer IPv6 but fallback quickly. So it is likely to be turned on transparently.

There is no INTERNAL_IP6_ADDRESS, there is just an IP6_ADDRESS. The firewall blocks or permits dynamically (likely stateful connection management). The /64 subnet that is routed to your network is expected to be routed to the endpoint by your router if needed (modulo firewall rules).

The biggest issue for home networking is the lack of management of the router/firewall itself. You can't port forward (no config UI), you can't permit specific ports in most current home router implementations. However, configuration of ports and so on are not something that the vast majority of users know or care about.

Comment: Re:How about basic security? (Score 1) 157

by mtippett (#49515449) Attached to: Why the Journey To IPv6 Is Still the Road Less Traveled

2: Attackers can view your entire IP space. A simple nmap scan, then choosing what zero days to use... instant pwn-ership.

Hmm... Non-direct allocated IP on your subnet, 64 bit subnet, pwn-ership aint that trivial. Scanning a 64-bit address space (AT&T allocates a full /64 to me at home) is going to be pretty obvious at the firewall.

Welcome back to the internet of the early 1990's we all lived on the internet with real IPs, but were protected from firewalls... This whole concept of everyone on a Class C/B/A private subnet thing has only been around for a couple of decades.

Comment: Re:IPv6's day will come, but... (Score 2) 157

by mtippett (#49515413) Attached to: Why the Journey To IPv6 Is Still the Road Less Traveled

The main difference tech people will see is that they can't ping an IPv6 address from memory. mDNS (as in xyz.local) will become the only way to access another machine with any sanity.

Monitoring DNS at home, most services are already mixing (with a preference, but quick fallback from IPv6). So I'd say that the major websites are already primarily accessed via IPv6. You won't notice it.

It'll just take years...

Comment: It is coming... On Weekends... From Home... (Score 5, Interesting) 157

by mtippett (#49515383) Attached to: Why the Journey To IPv6 Is Still the Road Less Traveled

I have IPV6 at home (took some calls to AT&T Customer Support). I don't have it at work, the migration will probably start small network endpoints (phones (apparently t-mobile has already switch), and home networks).

Link local IPV6 is already fairly broadly available - it's the fe80 prefixed address on your ifconfig output. You should be able to ping other ipv6 addresses on your network (*nix to *nix).

Google's IPv6 stats page indicates this too... https://www.google.com/intl/en... has a peculiar comb effect for the last few years. Zooming in seems to give a bit more insight. Google's count of IPv6 connections has a full 1% swing over the weekends vs the week days. Due to IPv6's addressing method, each unique device on your network appears as a unique device on the internet, vs the NATed IPv4 that we all know and love. This would also have an accelerating increase in the number of unique IPs that are visible on the weekend. I know I use more devices over the weekend (chromebook, phone, laptop, table) vs during the week.

Open to other insights, but our homes will be likely IPv6 before our offices are. (Of course aggressive tech companies like google and facebook are likely already IPv6).

Comment: The danger of ngXYZ (Score 2) 232

by mtippett (#49377115) Attached to: Why You Should Choose Boring Technology

The same thing happens with the hope for the "next generation" product solving all the ills of the current generation. Or the assumption that the code you have inherited was created by fools a number of years back.

The reality is that software has a set of maturity related bugs and a set of structural, intractable issues that are related to the design and architecture of the system. Each piece of software has it's unique set of intractable issues.

Software that has been in production has typically reduced it's maturity related bugs. The software built on top or that integrates with it is built around those intractable issues. When you move to a new piece of software - either a new architecture or the "groundbreaking ng version of XYZ", you end up with swapping a set of *known* intractable issues, for a set of *unknown* intractable issues plus a set of maturity related bugs.

Similar to TFA, the risks of old+known vs new+immaturity+unknown needs to have another factor similar to "value-add". If the value-add *really* adds a lot of stare the risks in the eye and march forward. If the value add is marginal, make sure the meta-benefits (performance, maintainability, etc) are clear and understood, otherwise you may be facing a train wreck of an upgrade.

Seen it many times, always wary of the ngXYZ project...

Comment: Purple Unicorns and the Meat Grinder (Score 3, Interesting) 292

by mtippett (#49217393) Attached to: Do Tech Companies Ask For Way Too Much From Job Candidates?

Reposting as a non AC.

There are some reasons for the unrealistic job descriptions, they are a lure, and are generally loosely associated with the role (ie: 80%). We're hoping for a purple unicorn, but know that they don't exist. But would settle for a winged horse, a unicorn, a purple horse or more realistically a good horse. But occasionally one of the unrealistic mix of experience does come through.

It has been almost a decade since I last went through an applicant list for a particular role.

What happens most times now is an application is added to an applicant tracking system. This parses the resume (from word, pdf or text) and creates a database of candidates matching keywords. This meatgrinder approach means that when I am looking to fill a position, I don't actually look for applications - I might - or the HR might quickly review the actual applications. What I do is search and screen. Search for a set of keywords, and from that list look for obvious issues (applicants to every job, rejected candidates, age of resume, etc). And then the HR recruiter will screen down from there.

I'll typically get 20 or so resumes to review. The recruiter may review 100 to 200 resumes. There pool of candidates may be 2000 to 3000 of which only a small portion are for my position.

This is part of the reason that resumes have gone from minimalistic to more fully descriptive with keywords sprinkled throughout them.

Comment: Automation is Dependent on Design for Manufacture (Score 3, Informative) 187

by mtippett (#49157459) Attached to: Foxconn Factories' Future: Fewer Humans, More Robots

I've been to Foxconn factories in Shenzen, and there are clearly opportunities for deeper automation. However, this will only be possible when the underlying hardware design has been designed for automation.

At the PCB level, pick and place achieves amazing automation and performance with smaller than rice-grain size components used in modern electronics. That is a given.

At the assembly level it isn't so easy to automate with a lot of the designs. There are flex cables, adhesive, torque sensitive screws that all rely on a human to be able to manipulate and then quickly respond to misalignment. To automate this, the design constraints placed on the Industrial Designs need to change. For low and mid-range products where form is not at the level of Apple integration, this will probably increase the automation. For the high end where every mm counts it's unlikely that there will be a high level of assembly automation.

Comment: Round Hole, Square Peg.. (Score 1) 193

by mtippett (#49089573) Attached to: Human DNA Enlarges Mouse Brains

I'm not anywhere near knowledgable about medicine, but if the brain is larger, does the cranial cavity grow increase to the same level?

I wonder if there a round hole, square peg kind (big brain, small cranial cavity) of issue coming. The brains might be smarter, but they may suffer from decreased mental abilities from intracranial pressure.

The Military

Alleged Satellite Photo Says Ukraine Shootdown of MH17 340

Posted by timothy
from the if-the-glove-won't-fit dept.
theshowmecanuck (703852) writes A group calling itself the Russian Union of Engineers has published a photograph, picked up by many news organizations (just picked one, Google it yourself to find more), claiming to show that MH17 was shot down by a Ukrainian fighter plane. The interesting thing is the very quick ad hoc crowd sourced debunking of the photograph using tools from Google maps, online photos/data, to their own domain knowledge backed up with the previous information. It would be interesting to understand who the "Russian Union of Engineers" are and why they in particular were chosen to release this information.
Australia

Amazon's Luxembourg Tax Deals 200

Posted by samzenpus
from the pay-less dept.
Presto Vivace writes in with this story of a European Commission investigation into a secret tax agreement between Amazon and Luxembourg. "Leaked tax documents from accounting firm PwC in Luxembourg show how Amazon sidesteps the 30 per cent tax rates local [Australian] players face. The Luxembourg documents, obtained in a review led by the International Consortium of Investigative Journalists, contain some of the first hard numbers and details on how Amazon pays virtually no tax for its non-US earnings, including in Australia. Last month, the European Commission announced an investigation into the secret 2003 advance tax agreement Amazon struck with Luxembourg that is the key to its global tax strategy. The Luxembourg documents show not only the extent of the related-party transactions in Amazon's Luxembourg companies but how Amazon has changed its tax strategy after investigation by French tax authorities and the US Internal Revenue Service. The change is so dramatic it raises questions whether the European Commission is targeting the right transactions."

Comment: Able to Code != Professional (Score 1) 546

by mtippett (#47819477) Attached to: Does Learning To Code Outweigh a Degree In Computer Science?

Title aside, the ability to code is a workplace requirement, and if you are not looking at traveling/work internationally, you aren't going to get very far without a degree.

Some of the "college drop out" success stories are no longer just coders. They are now C-Level executives, different rules apply. If you don't have a degree then in general you won't be eligible to get Visas to work in other countries.

Independent about how good you are, without a degree you are restricted to your local geography (country, etc).

"Necessity is the mother of invention" is a silly proverb. "Necessity is the mother of futile dodges" is much nearer the truth. -- Alfred North Whitehead

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