Slashdot stories can be listened to in audio form via an RSS feed, as read by our own robotic overlord.

 



Forgot your password?
typodupeerror

Comment: Re:Not a hoax but... (Score 1) 219

by mtdenial (#34887552) Attached to: The Biggest Hoaxes In Wikipedia's First Decade
I have one along a vaguely similar line. Before a road trip to the Rocky Mountains I was doing some research on the wildlife. http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Mountain_goat&oldid=111931466This was the current version at the time.

Read the last paragraph of the general appearance and the reproductive cycle.

This one still makes me laugh. Before this, I knew it was possible to get less than accurate information from wikipedia, this was the first time I actually came across it.

Music

Astronaut Sues Dido For Album Cover 264

Posted by samzenpus
from the get-me-off-that-thing dept.
An anonymous reader writes "Astronaut Bruce McCandless is suing Dido for her album cover that uses a famous NASA photograph of a tiny, tiny, tiny McCandless floating in space. McCandless doesn't own the copyright on the photo, so he's claiming it's a violation of his publicity rights ... except that he's so tiny in the photo, it's not like anyone's going to recognize him."
PC Games (Games)

Civ 5 Will Let You Import and Convert Civ 4 Maps 142

Posted by Soulskill
from the backward-compatibility dept.
bbretterson writes "From an interview Bitmob conducted with Civilization 5 Lead Designer Jon Shafer: 'You can import Civ 4 maps into the world builder and convert them into Civ 5 maps, including all the units and cities and stuff on it — the conversion process will just do that for you automatically. We're hoping that the first week Civ 5 is out, people will use that function and port all of the Civ 4 stuff over to Civ 5, so everything will be out there already.'"
Classic Games (Games)

M.U.L.E. Is Back 110

Posted by Soulskill
from the not-for-the-red-wings dept.
jmp_nyc writes "The developers at Turborilla have remade the 1983 classic game M.U.L.E. The game is free, and has slightly updated graphics, but more or less the same gameplay as the original version. As with the original game, up to four players can play against each other (or fewer than four with AI players taking the other spots). Unlike the original version, the four players can play against each other online. For those of you not familiar with M.U.L.E., it was one of the earliest economic simulation games, revolving around the colonization of the fictitious planet Irata (Atari spelled backwards). I have fond memories of spending what seemed like days at a time playing the game, as it's quite addictive, with the gameplay seeming simpler than it turns out to be. I'm sure I'm not the only Slashdotter who had a nasty M.U.L.E. addiction back in the day and would like a dose of nostalgia every now and then."
Linux Business

How Facebook Runs Its LAMP Stack 111

Posted by Soulskill
from the very-carefully-and-sometimes-not dept.
prostoalex writes "At QCon San Francisco, Aditya Agarwal of Facebook described how his employer runs its software stack (video and slides). Facebook runs a typical LAMP setup where P stands for PHP with certain customizations, and back-end services that are written in C++ and Java. Facebook has released some of the infrastructure components into the open source community, including the Thrift RPC framework and Scribe distributed logging server."

Comment: Re:Nothing new (Score 5, Informative) 267

by mtdenial (#26944387) Attached to: Court Reinstates Proof-of-Age Requirement For Nude Ads

One of the google talks by Violet Blue actually had some interesting information on the 2257 requirement. She did not go quite this far in criticising the law, but pointed out some very serious problems with it.

Basically, a decent chunk of people who needed to prove age for 2257 compliance basically just had pictures of them with the driver's license. Of course, many people tend not to perform under their real name and if these pictures get onto the internet, then someone else can tie a face to a real name and possibly even an address. Not a good situation in general. From what I gather, the wording of the law was pretty vague as well as to what sort of proof was required and who could eventually ask for it.

Anyhow, a pretty interesting talk here with some relevance to the topic: Violet Blue (Google Tech Talks)

Comment: Re:Not the first time! (Score 1) 120

by mtdenial (#24797089) Attached to: Kaminsky DNS Bug Claimed Fixed By 1-Character Patch
It's not the first time that any huge defects have been caused by a single character. Quoting Code Complete who in turned was referencing an article from the early 80's (Kill that Code, Gerald Weinberg), "...three of the most expensive software errors of all time-costing $1.8 billion, $900 million and $245 million- involved the change of a single character in a previously correct program. So on the one hand, it's easy to sort of snicker that they were so close to having a correct implementation, but just missed, but on the other hand, there is a long and storied history of us programmers blowing things by a single character. I mean, isn't the 'off by one' error still one of the most common ones in development code, a instead of =, index instead of index-1 or whatever? At least now that the defect has been isolated and can be fixed. One character fix is much better than a full redesign...

Riches: A gift from Heaven signifying, "This is my beloved son, in whom I am well pleased." -- John D. Rockefeller, (slander by Ambrose Bierce)

Working...