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+ - Emergency Adobe Flash Patch Fixes Zero Day Under Attack->

Submitted by msm1267
msm1267 writes: Adobe released an emergency patch for a Flash zero day used in targeted attacks by APT3, the same group behind 2014’s Clandestine Fox attacks.

Adobe said Flash Player 18.0.0.161 and earlier for Windows and Macintosh systems are affected, as is 11.2.202.466 for Linux 11.x versions.

The current iteration of Clandestine Fox attacks shares many traits with last year’s attacks, including generic, almost spam-like phishing emails intent on snaring as many victims as possible that can be analyzed for their value before additional attacks are carried out. The two campaigns also share the same custom backdoor called SHOTPUT, as well as an insistence on using a throwaway command and control infrastructure.

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+ - US Navy Solicits Zero Days->

Submitted by msm1267
msm1267 writes: The US Navy posted a RFP, which has since removed from FedBizOpps.gov, soliciting contractors to share vulnerability intelligence and develop zero day exploits for most of the leading commercial IT software vendors.

The Navy said it was looking for vulnerabilities, exploit reports and operational exploit binaries for commercial software, including but not limited to Microsoft, Adobe, [Oracle] Java, EMC, Novell, IBM, Android, Apple, Cisco IOS, Linksys WRT and Linux, among others.

The RFP seemed to indicate that the Navy was not only looking for offensive capabilities, but also wanted use the exploits to test internal defenses.The request, however, does require the contractor to develop exploits for future released CVEs. “Binaries must support configurable, custom, and/or government owned/provided payloads and suppress known network signatures from proof of concept code that may be found in the wild,” the RFP said.

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+ - Of Bug Bounties and Wassenaar in the US->

Submitted by msm1267
msm1267 writes: If the proposed US Wassenaar rules are enacted, researchers who make a living contributing to and participating in the numerous industry bug bounties may feel the pinch in their wallets. Worse may be the impact on the security of software worldwide since many independent researchers find a good number of the bugs that get patched.

Researchers are starting to speak out, not only about the rules' broad definition of intrusion software, but also about the potential need to share vulnerability details with a government if forced to apply for the required export license. Many may soon question whether it's worth the time and effort to go through the export process if governments are acting as a clearinghouse.

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+ - Researchers Comment on Proposed Wassenaar Rules->

Submitted by msm1267
msm1267 writes: Influential security researchers, including Halvar Flake and Jonathan Zdziarski, have begun publishing their comments, objections and concerns regarding the proposed U.S. export control rules under the Wassenaar Arrangement. The bug-hunters are worried that the rules' definition of intrusion software is too broad and would curtail vulnerability research, proof-of-concept exploit development, the use of certain scanners, pen-testing software, and other potential dual-use tools.
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+ - Exploit Kit Delivers Pharming Attacks Against SOHO Routers->

Submitted by msm1267
msm1267 writes: For the first time, DNS redirection attacks against small office and home office routers are being delivered via exploit kits. French security researcher Kafeine said an offshoot of the Sweet Orange kit has been finding success in driving traffic from compromised routers to the attackers' infrastructure.The risk to users is substantial he said, ranging from financial loss, to click-fraud, man-in-the-middle attacks and phishing.
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+ - Security Researchers Wary of Wassenaar Rules->

Submitted by msm1267
msm1267 writes: The Commerce Department’s Bureau of Industry and Security today made public its proposal to implement the controversial Wassenaar Arrangement, and computer security specialists are wary of its language and vagaries.

For starters, its definition of "intrusion software" that originally was meant to stem the effect of spying software such as FinFisher and Hacking Team, has also apparently snared many penetration testing tools. Also, despite the Commerce Department's insistence that vulnerability research does not fall under Wassenaar, researchers say that's up for interpretation.

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+ - ICU Project Patches Memory Vulnerabilities->

Submitted by msm1267
msm1267 writes: Multitudes of software packages that make use of the ICU Project C/C++ and Java libraries may need to update after a pair of memory-based vulnerabilities were discovered and subsequently patched.

Version 55.1 of the ICU Project ICU4C library, released yesterday, addresses separate heap-based buffer overflow and integer overflow bugs in versions 52 through 54. Older versions of the library could also be affected, said researcher Pedro Ribeiro of Agile Information Security, who discovered the vulnerabilities while fuzzing LibreOffice, one of the numerous open source and enterprise software packages that are built using the library.

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+ - Coordinated Takedown Puts End to Simda Botnet->

Submitted by msm1267
msm1267 writes: The Simda botnet, known for spreading banking malware and dropping a backdoor on hundreds of thousands of machines worldwide, was taken down last Thursday in a collaborative effort between international law enforcement bodies and private security and technology companies.

Thirteen command and control servers in four countries were seized, putting an end to a malware family that has infected more than 90,000 computers since January of this year alone.

Simda distributed several types of malware including financial Trojans and illicit software, and has been active since the end of 2012. The keepers of Simda make frequent functionality updates and constantly enhance its capabilities to evade detection by researchers and security software, making it an attractive option for cybercriminals, who buy only access to Simda-infected machines and then install additional malicious code on the machines.

The takedown was coordinated by the INTERPOL Global Complex for Innovation in Singapore, the Cyber Defense Institute, the FBI, the Dutch National High Tech Crime Unit (NHTCU), Microsoft, Kaspersky Lab and Trend Micro. Not only were officials able to seize command and control servers and domains, but were also able to sinkhole Simda traffic. That traffic shows a diverse set of victims in more than 40 countries, officials said.

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+ - TrueCrypt Alternatives Step Up Post-Cryptanalysis-> 1 1

Submitted by msm1267
msm1267 writes: What's next for TrueCrypt now that a two-phase audit of the code and its cryptography uncovered a few critical vulnerabilities, but no backdoors? Two alternative open source encryption projects forked TrueCrypt once its developers decided to abandon the project in early 2014, giving rise to VeraCrypt and CipherShed--and both are ready to accelerate growth, compatibility and functionality now that the TrueCrypt code has been given a relative clean bill of health.
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+ - Students Build Open Source Web-Based Threat Modeling Tool->

Submitted by msm1267
msm1267 writes: Students at St. Mary’s University in Nova Scotia, Canada, participating in Mozilla’s Winter of Security 2014 project, built a browser-based threat modeling tool that simplifies visualization of systems and data flows, and where soft spots might be introduced during design.

The tool, called Seasponge, has been made available on Github and its developers are hoping to not only get feedback and feature suggestions, but also hope to encourage developers to introduce threat modeling into SDLs in order to fix bugs while in design when it’s cheap to do so.

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+ - How Malvertising Abuses Real-Time Bidding on Ad Networks->

Submitted by msm1267
msm1267 writes: Dark corners of the Internet harbor trouble. They’re supposed to. But what about when Yahoo, CNN.com, TMZ and other busy destination sites heave disaster upon visitors?

That’s the challenge posed by malvertising, the latest hacker Golden Goose used in cybercrime operations and even in some targeted attacks. Hackers are thriving in this arena because they have found an unwittingly complicit partner in the sundry ad networks to move malicious ads through legitimate processes.

Adding gasoline to the raging fire is the abuse of real-time ad bidding, a revolution in the way online ads are sold. RTB enables better ad targeting for advertisers and less unsold inventory for publishers. Hackers can also hitch a ride with RTB and target malicious ads on any site they wish, much the way a legitimate advertiser would use the same system.

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+ - MIT Debuts Integer Overflow Debugger->

Submitted by msm1267
msm1267 writes: Students from M.I.T. have devised a new and more efficient way to scour raw code for integer overflows, the troublesome programming bugs that serve as a popular exploit vector for attackers and often lead to the crashing of systems.

Researchers from the school’s Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory (CSAIL) last week debuted the platform dubbed DIODE, short for Directed Integer Overflow Detection.

As part of an experiment, the researchers tested DIODE on code from five different open source applications. While the system was able to generate inputs that triggered three integer overflows that were previously known, the system also found 11 new errors. Four of the 11 overflows the team found are apparently still lingering in the wild, but the developers of those apps have been informed and CSAIL is awaiting confirmation of fixes.

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+ - BIOS Rootkit Implant To Debut at CanSecWest->

Submitted by msm1267
msm1267 writes: Research on new BIOS vulnerabilities and a working rootkit implant will be presented on Friday at the annual CanSecWest security conference. An attacker with existing remote access on a compromised computer can use the implant to turn down existing protections in place to prevent re-flashing of the firmware, enabling the implant to be inserted and executed.

The devious part of the exploit is that the researchers have found a way to insert their agent into System Management Mode, which is used by firmware and runs separately from the operating system, managing various hardware controls. System Management Mode also has access to memory, which puts supposedly secure and privacy focused operating systems such as Tails in the line of fire of the implant.

Their implant, the researchers said, is able to scrape the secret PGP key Tails uses for encrypted communication, for example. It can also steal passwords and encrypted communication. The implant survives OS re-installation and even Tails’ built-in protections, including its capability of wiping RAM.

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+ - Persistent DLL Hijacking Works Against OS X->

Submitted by msm1267
msm1267 writes: DLL hijacking has plagued Windows machines back as far as 2000 and provides hackers with a quiet way to gain persistence on a vulnerable machine, or remotely exploit a vulnerable application. And now it’s come to Apple’s Mac OS X.

This week at the CanSecWest conference in Vancouver, a researcher will explain different attacks that abuse dylibs in OS X for many of the same outcomes as with Windows: persistence; process injection; security feature bypass (in this case, Apple Gatekeeper); and remote exploitation.

Source code for a scanner that discovers apps that are vulnerable to the attack is also expected to be released. Using the script, the researcher was able to find 144 binaries vulnerable to different flavors of the dylib hijacking attacks, including Apple’s Xcode, iMovie and Quicktime plugins, Microsoft Word, Excel, and PowerPoint, and third-party apps such as Java, Dropbox, GPG Tools and Adobe plugins.

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