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Submission + - Experiences working as a Programmer for Blizzard and other Game Companies

msheekhah writes: I have a friend who, when he gets out of college, has been promised a job at Texas Instruments making $70k. However, he wants to instead go work for Blizzard or some other game company as a game programmer. I've read enough on here and on other tech websites to know that he should take the TI job. Can you share with me your experiences so I can give him real life examples to convince him to take this job? If your experience is contrary to mine, I'd appreciate that input as well.

Submission + - President can sign ACTA into effect (

msheekhah writes: In a TechDirt article, Mike Masnik asks Senator Wyden about ACTA:

Senator Wyden says, " It may be possible for the U.S. to implement ACTA or any other trade agreement, once validly entered, without legislation if the agreement requires no change in U.S. law..." but "...the executive branch lacks constitutional authority to enter a binding international agreement covering issues delegated by the Constitution to Congress' authority". However, then he states that "...if you allow the USTR to express your assent to ACTA, then the agreement can bind the U.S. under international law even without Congress' consent, because international law, not U.S. law, determines the binding effect of international agreements. According to many international law scholars, customary international law recognizes the ability of the chief executive of a country to bind its nation to an international agreement regardless of domestic legal requirements."

So while the treaty won't stand up before judicial review inside of the United States, it can still be considered binding in International Law. You then have to determine which has greater sovereignty in American courts.

The Internet

Submission + - HR 1981 should be called 1984: SOPA masquerading a ( 1

msheekhah writes: "Senate Majority Leader Chip Rogers is sponsoring a bill to make your internet data available to investigators if you are even accused, and to require your ISP to retain 18 months of your internet access logs. This is under the guise of a child pornography protection act, but is in fact giving the police to, without probable cause, look through all of your internet activity. All you have to do is be accused. Is this something the internet cares to allow?"

Submission + - Slashdot Does Nothing about SOPA (

msheekhah writes: "As a site that is based off of user submitted content, including shared summaries of news from other websites, you would think that hardcore IP censorship laws would be an issue for Slashdot. Under SOPA/PIPA, Slashdot could be blocked if a user copypasta's TFA instead of summarizes it. The crackerjack editorial staff usually won't allow that, but this is a risk. Yet, we hear nothing from Slashdot itself."

The trouble with a lot of self-made men is that they worship their creator.