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Submission + - Facebook + Instagram asking for photo IDs (cnet.com)

140Mandak262Jamuna writes: Apparently Facebook and Instagram are asking their account holders to verify their identity using government issued photo ids that include their full name and date of birth. Your account has been secured and requires account validation. Please login to Instagram.com from your desktop computer to validate your identify. is the message they are getting, according to CNET. CNET is speculating that it is an attempt by these companies to crack down on underage users because they are worried about the liability.

And here in slashdot we are obsessing with privacy and google getting to collect so much of info etc etc. Out there there are people who seem to be willing to upload their IDs to these sites, and think it is a fair price to pay for these services. Is there a site that will give a fake photoshopped government issued ID to upload to such services?


Submission + - John Melloncamp: We need tougher IP laws (huffingtonpost.com)

Vladius writes: "From the Huffington Post, John Melloncamp states that the DMCA is weak and "kind of a joke" when dealing with search engines. He also supports the removal of safe harbor provisions. All of this is being done, in his opinion, because it is ruining the music industry and costing us jobs."

Submission + - Australian Journo Arrested for reporting on IT sec (smh.com.au)

An anonymous reader writes: An Australian journalist was arrested by Queensland Police yesterday after reporting about vulnerabilities in Facebook's privacy controls on Sydney Morning Herald Newspaper. He was covering a conference organised by AusCERT.

Submission + - Betty Boop and Indefinite Copyright (cartoonbrew.com)

An anonymous reader writes: US Court of Appeals officially recognizes that under the current regime, characters like Betty Boopy "would essentially never enter the public domain".

"Apparently the Fleischer estate has lost a court battle for the rights to Betty Boop, a character created by Grim Natwick at Max Fleischer’s studio in 1930."

"The Fleischer Studio tried to sue Avela Inc. over its licensing of public domain Betty Boop poster images (for handbags and T-shirts). The 9th Circuit U.S. Court of Appeals (based in San Francisco) ruled against the Fleischers, saying in their decision, “If we ruled that AVELA’s depictions of Betty Boop infringed Fleischer’s trademarks, the Betty Boop character would essentially never enter the public domain.”"

"So where does that leave Ms. Boop? No longer represented by the heirs of Max Fleischer and King Features Syndicate? Does this make Harvey Comics – or by extention, its current owner Classic Media – the owner of the property? Or is the character now in public domain."


Submission + - Tolkien Censors Tolkien 1

Anonymous Coward writes: "Back in the late 2009, I got into a Twitter conversation with Madeline Ashby about geek culture, fandom, and a bunch of stuff like that. Madeline wrote, “While you were reading Tolkien, I was watching Evangelion.” I thought this was an excellent encapsulation of the divide in SF/F/Whatever fandom, and thus took to Zazzle to make little buttons with her quote. I bought a bunch, handed them out at a few conventions, then I had a kid and promptly forgot all about it.

Until today, when Zazzle emailed me to say they were pulling the buttons for intellectual property right infringement.

And guess who complained about their rights being infringed?

I’ve tried to come up with something more to say about this, but I’m too angry and confused and tired to say anything more than I did in the title of this post. Have fun milking your dad’s stuff, Christopher Tolkien!"

Submission + - Thingiverse gets its first DMCA Notice (thingiverse.com) 2

Anonymous Coward writes: "The DMCA notice in question isn't from some large company but over the Penrose Triangle, something that by all rights should be ancient (public domain) history.

However, because Dr. Ulrich Schwanitz was already selling a Penrose Triangle on Shapeways, he felt justified in issuing a takedown notice from outside the US at Thingiverse, a site dedicated to sharing 3D models of 3D printable objects.

While the claim is almost certainly spurious due to the ancient nature of the original triangle, the fact that the poster generated his version from scratch, and the fact that copyright does not protect ideas, the DMCA requires that such claims be responded to swiftly, so the Thingiverse moderators have removed the offending object.

This is a pretty clear cut example of the chilling effect of what essentially amounts to the guilty-until-proven-innocent model of the DMCA rules on hosting material of questionable copyright."

Submission + - ACTA Talks Conclude As Global DMCA On 2010 Agenda

An anonymous reader writes: The latest round of negotiations on the Anti-Counterfeiting Trade Agreement, the secret copyright treaty promoting a Global DMCA, finished up yesterday in Mexico. While governments had little to say, there have been enough leaks to know what is there. With several months before the next round of talks in New Zealand, now is the time to learn more about what you can do.

On the Internet, nobody knows you're a dog. -- Cartoon caption