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Measuring the Speed of Light With Valentine's Day Chocolate Screenshot-sm 126

Cytotoxic writes "What to do with all of those leftover Valentine's Day chocolates? — a common problem for the Slashdot crowd. The folks over at Wired magazine have an answer for you in a nice article showing how to measure the speed of light with a microwave and some chocolate. A simple yet surprisingly accurate method that can be used to introduce the scientific method to children and others in need of a scientific education."

Submission + - Microsoft warns of TLS/SSL flaw in Windows (

Rish writes: Microsoft has issued Security Advisory (977377) to address a publicly disclosed vulnerability in the Transport Layer Security (TLS) and Secure Sockets Layer (SSL) protocols. The TLS and SSL protocols are implemented in several Microsoft products, both client and server. Currently Microsoft has concluded that it affects all supported versions of Windows: Windows 2000 SP4, Windows XP (32-bit and 64-bit), Windows Server 2003 (32-bit and 64-bit), Windows Vista (32-bit and 64-bit), Windows Server 2008 (32-bit and 64-bit), Windows 7 (32-bit and 64-bit), and Windows Server 2008 R2. Microsoft says it will update the advisory as the investigation progresses.

This warning should not be confused with the 13 Security Bulletins fixing 26 vulnerabilities Microsoft released today on this month's Patch Tuesday; the company is simply stating that it is investigating the flaw. Microsoft also makes sure to note that since the issue implicates an Internet standard, the company recognizes that it affects multiple vendors and is working on a coordinated response with its partners in the Internet Consortium for Advancement of Security on the Internet (ICASI).


Belkin's President Apologizes For Faked Reviews 137

remove office writes "After I wrote about how Belkin's sales rep Mike Bayard had been paying for fake reviews of his company's products using Mechanical Turk, hundreds of readers across the Web expressed their outrage. As a result of the online outcry, Belkin's president Mark Reynoso has issued a statement apologizing and saying that 'this is an isolated incident' and that 'Belkin does not participate in, nor does it endorse, unethical practices like this.' Amazon moved swiftly to remove several reviews on Belkin products it believed were fraudulent. But now fresh evidence of astroturfing has surfaced, by the same Belkin executive."

The trouble with doing something right the first time is that nobody appreciates how difficult it was.