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Comment Re:right decision (Score 4, Funny) 111

No nightmare. From my standpoint it would make my life as an admin easier.

Employee: "Hey. I lost this email from so and so a while back"
Me: "Oooooo... Ya. Sorry about that. We don't back your email up. We only backup company data."

Employee: "Hey. I keep getting spam."
Me: "Sounds like a personal problem to me. It's your email. Fix it."


Submission + - Ray tracing for gaming explored ( 3

Vigile writes: "Ray tracing is still thought of as the 'holy grail' for real-time imagery but because of the intense amount of calculations required it has been plagued with long frame render times. This might soon change, at least according to an article from Daniel Pohl, a researcher at Intel. With upcoming many-core processors like Intel's Larrabee he believes that real-time ray tracing for games is much closer than originally thought thanks in large part to the efficiency it allows with spatial partitioning and reflections when compared to current rasterization techniques. Titles like Valve's Portal are analyzed to see how they could benefit from ray tracing technology and the article on PC Perspective concludes with the difficulties combing the two rendering techniques as well as a video of the technology in action."
The Matrix

Submission + - Online ad tracking targetted by privacy groups (

Technical Writing Geek writes: "A coalition of privacy groups Wednesday called for creation of a "Do Not Track List," that would prohibit advertisers from tracking online movements of consumers.

Similar to the popular Do Not Call telephone lists, the Internet proposal comes as online advertising revenues are growing rapidly, providing critical revenue to startups and Web giants such as Google Inc. and Yahoo Inc.;ylt=omg_wtf"


Submission + - QVC computer glitch scammer enters guilty plea (

coondoggie writes: "A computer glitch in home-shopping network QVC's computers let a woman scam the company for $412,000 and more then 1,800 items. That woman, Quantina Moore-Perry, 33, of Greensboro, NC pled guilty to the scam in Federal court this week and agreed to surrender the $412,000. Authorities said Quantina Moore-Perry of Greensboro, exploited a glitch in QVC's computer system where she would receive merchandise without being charged if she canceled an order immediately after placing it. Authorities said there was no evidence Perry caused the computer glitch, rather she just took advantage of it. Perry then took the 1,800 products she received and resold items on eBay from March to November 2005."
Data Storage

Submission + - Seagate 'misled on storage capacity'

jetkins writes: The Melbourne Age reports that Seagate has capitulated in the kilo/kibi wars and agreed to settle a class action suit which charged that their drives do not actually provide the advertised capacity.

"Seagate believes that its advertising and other business practices were, and are proper in all respects. However, because of the expense and burden of litigation, Seagate believes that resolving the matter through settlement is in the best interests of Seagate and its customers."

Under the terms of the settlement, Seagate will label its products with disclosures regarding the storage capacity of its hard drives, and will pay court costs of $US1.75 million ($A1.91 million).
Sun Microsystems

Submission + - Sun CEO and lead lawyer blog about patent dispute (

TheOnlyRealPerson writes: Sun Microsystem's lead general counsel and its CEO blog about the patent dispute with NetApp. NetApp responds that this may open Johnathon Schwartz up to being deposed, and that any information that GC lawyer Mike Dillion blogs about may constitute a waiver of privilege.

Submission + - FCC OKs Cable TV Competition (

Tech.Luver writes: "FCC on Wednesday approved a rule that would ban exclusive agreements that cable television operators have with apartment buildings, opening up competition for other video providers that could eventually lead to lower prices. The Federal Communications Commission unanimously approved the change, which Chairman Kevin Martin said would help lower cable rates for millions of subscribers who live in apartment buildings and other multi-unit dwellings, or about 25 million households. He said the move would particularly help minorities who disproportionately live in multi-unit dwellings. ( )"

Verizon Might Deliver Google Phone 115

MrCrassic writes "There are talks floating around surrounding Google's possible talks with Verizon and possibly T-Mobile to establish an agreement for the carrier to deliver phones carrying Google's speculated mobile operating system. According to the article, one of the main hurdles slowing down the product are concerns about user privacy and advertising, one of Google's well-renowned strengths. With over 6 million customers potentially at their disposal, could this be "the deal" that establishes Google's hegemony in the internet sphere?"
It's funny.  Laugh.

Who Needs a Satellite Dish When You Have a Wok? 250

An anonymous reader writes "Why pay $20,000 for a commercial link to run your television station when a $10 kitchen wok from the Warehouse is just as effective? This is exactly how North Otago's newest television station 45 South is transmitting its signal from its studio to the top of Cape Wanbrow, in a bid to keep costs down."
Sun Microsystems

Submission + - Sun joins the Free Software Foundation

RLiegh writes: " reports that Sun has joined the FSF Corporate Patron program. The article explains that the FSF corporate program allows companies to provide financial assistance to the FSF in return for license consulting services. The article goes on to observe that this move is doubtlessly motivated by Sun's interest in the direction that GPL3 is going to take.

Now that sun has opened up Java and become an FSF corporate sponsor...could the move to dual license Opensolaris under the GPL3 be far behind?"

Submission + - Sourceforge closed CompileFarm. Now what?

int32 writes: Anyone used sourceforge's CompileFarm? Well I did a lot. As of now, I've just found that its single distinguishing feature was abandoned some weeks ago: 65363 . CompileFarm was the project where you could compile and test your application on a bunch of various architectures on different unices. Was really helpful for portability, especially for testing your code on both 32 and 64 bit platforms... well, no more. It sucks, but show must go on. Therefore, questions to the slashdot crowd: how do you test your C/C++ code for portability? Are there (free) alternatives to CompileFarm?

Another megabytes the dust.