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Comment: You can still do dinner with the family (Score 2) 274

by mrand (#46916121) Attached to: Ask Slashdot: Joining a Startup As an Older Programmer?

Even if long hours are called for, I assume it is flex hours?

During the mega crunch times at the start-up I was at, I'd come home and eat dinner with the family and play with the kid. After they went to bed, I'd sometimes work from home, or even go back in to the office if necessary. Question is how much sleep do you need? I do ok with 6.5 to 7.5.

If you're really really concerned about it, after they've made you the offer you could tell them that you are super excited and interested, but that you have this one concern and want to know what their expectations are, and what common understanding you might be able to work out.

        Marc

Comment: Re:Custom Firmware? (Score 1) 148

by mrand (#43373073) Attached to: AMI Firmware Source Code, Private Key Leaked

Possible? Yes. Likely? That's somewhat less clear.

Did it include the build environment also, or just the raw source? Does the source match up with your chipset VERY closely (if not, do you have long road ahead)?

When compiling a Jasper Forest BIOS for example, there is:
1. Source for the Jasper Forest family of CPUs (which is different than the source for all other familes)
2. Source for any BIOS-supported ICs on the system which differ from Intel's reference design (perhaps you have a different super I/O, for example?)
3. A configurator which sets a ton of build options #define's. It has an integrated compiler as well
4. An Intel BIOS packaging tool which adds a few Intel proprietary things

The only one that I would guarantee to be universal is is #1: Different BIOS source for the different families of CPU's.

          Marc

Comment: Re:That might have been their plan all along... (Score 2) 124

by mrand (#43162623) Attached to: Bruce Schneier: A Cyber Cold War Could Destabilize the Internet

For decades, the American economy has suffered while China's has boomed, and the American people are entitled to know who is responsible for the tremendous economic victory in Asia and the dismal American defeat-the greatest defeat any nation has suffered in war or peace.

Whatever it is you are babbling about, I strongly suspect the majority of the citizens of the United States are as responsible as anyone. But just to be clear, what EXACTLY are you trying to find a responsible party for on this witch hunt of yours? "the american economy has suffered"... that's a pretty broad stroke, as is "economic victory in Asia." Do you think there is someone to blame for Japan not participating in this "victory"? Same or different villan than is to blame for the US woes?

Marc

Comment: Watering the foundation of our houses! (Score 2) 318

by mrand (#40936931) Attached to: For Much of the World, Demand For Water Outstrips Supply

Talk about a waste of water: parts of north Texas (and many other areas obviously), have clay soil which moves in crazy ways if allowed to dry out too much. This moves you house in crazy ways, causing cracks inside and out. The solution? We're encouraged to water our foundations. Huge amounts of water go to this, which results in our lake levels getting low, which puts us into water restrictions where we can't water the lawn.

Better solutions would be (1) build the foundations to withstand the soil moving, (2) and/or use a different method to keep the soil stable. I'm skipping (3) move elsewhere because DFW is not going to sprout legs and go take over Oklahoma. Unfortunately (2) likely suffers the same problem as the current solution of watering the foundation with soaker hoses: it's basically impossible to do it evenly... so you end up with overmoist areas, and other areas that still move some.

        Marc

Comment: Re:Time to dump PowerPC support? (Score 1) 158

by mrand (#40669039) Attached to: Torvalds Bemoans Size of RC7 For Linux Kernel 3.5

the embedded space has used lots of PPC for years. Notice it stated SoC?

Exactly right. We're designing a high-end router right now with 40 Gbps ports and the management CPUs are PPC based - just like all the other equipment we've designed (and all the other vendors too) for the past 15 years. In this case, one of the CPU's even runs Linux.

      Marc

Comment: Funny responses (Score 3, Interesting) 433

by mrand (#39221759) Attached to: Science and Engineering Workforce Has Stalled In the US

It's funny reading all the responses saying "It's obvious"... and then each response gives a different cause.

If I knew then what I know now, I would probably not have gone into electrical engineering out of fear of offshoring. Thus far it hasn't completed killed engineering in the USA, but it has certainly made a big dent. But I don't know that the majority of young engineers know to even fear that...

        Marc

Comment: Re:Intruiged (Score 1) 274

by mrand (#38003058) Attached to: Asus Unveils Quad-Core Transformer Prime Tablet

We never undock our Transformer that we've had since mid-summer - so we use it more like a netbook. But it really opens your eyes to how certain use cases are really improved used touch screen. Yes, you can get by with a mouse, but there are many things which are really much more efficient with touch. After extended use, my wife and I bought try to touch the screen on non-touch laptops - it is so much more natural than a mouse.

      Marc

Comment: Re:FPGA compatibility? (Score 1) 403

by mrand (#36757384) Attached to: Bitcoin Mining Tests On 16 NVIDIA and AMD GPUs

I think that if there's any likelihood of Bitcoin becoming significant, there's also going to be an increasing likelihood of someone dividing the problem space in such a way that it's addressable with appropriately-designed FPGAs and thereby killing that likelihood of significance. Right now it's unlikely to be worth anyone's time & money (unless it's being examined in classes), but if there are significant $ there someone's going to be pursuing them.

There is no way to know without doing the FPGA design, at least at a high level. What you might make up for in one area, you might lose in another. The fact that the AMD's run at such a high clock rate with so many ALU's makes me doubt it would be worth it - but again, there is no way to know for sure without doing considerable work. Just going on number of ALU's (which is not really a proper way to compare, but is the only thing we for this discussion), only the latest HUGE and really expensive Virtex 7 parts have more DSP's.

      Marc

Ref:
http://www.xilinx.com/publications/prod_mktg/Virtex7-Product-Table.pdf vs.
https://en.bitcoin.it/wiki/Why_a_GPU_mines_faster_than_a_CPU#Why_are_AMD_GPUs_faster_than_Nvidia_GPUs?

Comment: Re:Cable Card (Score 2) 119

by mrand (#36362088) Attached to: GPL'd Driver and Linux Support For New H.264 Capture Card

An effective Linux DVR is possible. I know it is not ideal, but you can use an HD-PVR in Linux to capture (in 1080i) the output of any device that provides component output. That's what many MythTV users do... rent the cable company box and just capture the output. Like I said, not ideal, but it is possible, and many are doing it.

Marc

A CONS is an object which cares. -- Bernie Greenberg.

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