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Submission + - The Hidden FM Radio Inside Your Pocket (

mr crypto writes: Data providers would probably prefer you not know that most smart phones contain an FM chip that lets you listen to broadcasts for free: "But the FM chip is not activated on two-thirds of devices. That's because mobile makers have the FM capability switched off." The National Association of Broadcasters, National Public Radio, and American Public Media — have launched a lobbying campaign to get those radios switched on.

Submission + - Ubuntu Forums Compromised by Crackers

ikhider writes: On July 20th, 2013, crackers compromised Ubuntu forum security and according to the Ubuntu forum splash page now in place, appear to have "gotten every user's local username, password, and email address from the Ubuntu Forums database. The passwords are not stored in plain text, they are stored as salted hashes. However, if you were using the same password as your Ubuntu Forums one on another service (such as email), you are strongly encouraged to change the password on the other service ASAP. Ubuntu One, Launchpad and other Ubuntu/Canonical services are NOT affected by the breach." Interestingly, members of a Libre Ubuntu derivative, Trisquel, place the blame of compromised security on Ubuntu's policy of using proprietary forum software. It appears the world's most popular GNU/Linux distribution, Ubuntu, serves as an example as to what happens when you use non-free software.

Submission + - Kodak ended in-house production of acetate base used to make photographic film (

McGruber writes: According to a report by Rochester, NY CBS affiliate WROC ( Kodak has ended in-house production of the cellulose acetate base that is the primary component of photographic film.

Popular Photography magazine adds ( that, for more than 100 years, Kodak has made the acetate in house in bulk, providing the structural basis for the company's film. Now, with Kodak in bankruptcy, the company is firing 60 workers and shutting down the acetate machinery. Citing the decline in interest in film photography as a primary cause, Kodak will no longer undertake the time intensive process of acetate production.

Thankfully, the company has large stockpiles of the material, and once that runs out they will source it from elsewhere.

Submission + - Google Chrome 27 Is Out: 5% Faster Page Loads

An anonymous reader writes: Google on Tuesday released Chrome version 27 for Windows, Mac, and Linux. The new version features a big boost to page loads (now 5 percent faster on average) as well as significant updates for developers. You can update to the latest release now using the browser's built-in silent updater, or download it directly from

Submission + - Dart Is Not the Language You Think It Is

An anonymous reader writes: Seth Ladd has an excellent write-up of Dart "When Dart was originally launched, many developers mistook it for some sort of Java clone. In truth, Dart is inspired by a range of languages such as Smalltalk, Strongtalk, Erlang, C#, and JavaScript. Get past the semicolons and curly braces, and you’ll see a terse language without ceremony. "

Submission + - Google forbids users to loan or resell Google Glass. (

briancox2 writes: Move over DMCA. If you thought purchasing something shouldn't come with restrictions on what you can do with it, Google has taken it another step. Google is requiring people who purchase the first Google Glass. There's no word yet whether they are requiring you to keep them in your possession at all times, though it's unclear how else you can avoid breaking the terms of service if you have friends or family that like to borrow things you own.

Submission + - Connect to Wi-Fi Hotspots for Android (

An anonymous reader writes: Using Android, it’s easy to connect to multiple Wi-Fi networks, so you’ll never have to connect to the web when you arrive home as the device is already connected.

Submission + - Computer Glitch Creates Voting Precinct With No Residents (

phishead writes: "Barry Clegg, who chairs the line-drawing Charter Commission elaborated that the software "could not draw the line around the edge of the lake without putting a census block in the wrong ward; it would just connect along the shortest distance between two points, which meant a line across the lake.""

Submission + - Steve Wozniak exclusive online interview (

An anonymous reader writes: In this special edition of TalkCentral’s podcast, TalkCentral, we bring you a special, half-hour interview with Apple co-founder and legendary computer industry figure Steve Wozniak.

TalkCentral editor Duncan McLeod asked Wozniak, who is in Johannesburg to speak at First National Bank’s leadership summit, for his views on the mobile platform wars, the patent disputes between Apple and Samsung, the emergence of the post-PC era and much more besides. It’s an interview you simply don’t want to miss.

Submission + - Intelligence agencies turn to crowdsourcing (

An anonymous reader writes: IARPA — the sister agency to DARPA — is sponsoring researchers to examine crowdsourcing as a method to derive better intelligence predictions. The article says that this research will eventually be transitioned to the intelligence community to improve national intelligence estimates. Anyone can participate — even the general public.

Submission + - Fathers bequeath more mutations as they age (

ananyo writes: "In the 1930s, the pioneering geneticist J. B. S. Haldane noticed a peculiar inheritance pattern in families with long histories of haemophilia. The faulty mutation responsible for the blood-clotting disorder tended to arise on the X chromosomes that fathers passed to their daughters, rather than on those that mothers passed down. Haldane subsequently proposed that children inherit more mutations from their fathers than their mothers, although he acknowledged that “it is difficult to see how this could be proved or disproved for many years to come”.
That year has finally arrived: whole-genome sequencing of dozens of Icelandic families has at last provided the evidence that eluded Haldane. Moreover, the study, published in Nature, finds that the age at which a father sires children determines how many mutations those offspring inherit. By starting families in their thirties, forties and beyond, men could be increasing the chances that their children will develop autism, schizophrenia and other diseases often linked to new mutations (abstract)."

Submission + - Near-Field Authentication over Avian Carrier (

FreaKBeaNie writes: Audible range as an authentication mechanism? Chirp is an app to share images and urls using audible tones. It seems easier than joining a wifi network or pairing with blue-tooth, and trades the visual ick of a QR code for an audible intrusion in the form of a bird chirp. It's easier than whispering a link.

Submission + - TV with 16 times resolution of HDTV passed by UN standards body ( 1

Qedward writes: A new television format that has 16 times the resolution of current High Definition TV has been approved by an international standards body, Japanese sources said earlier today.

UHDTV, or Ultra High Definition Television, allows for programming and broadcasts at resolutions of up to 7680 by 4320, along with frame refresh rates of up to 120Hz, double that of most current HDTV broadcasts. The format also calls for a broader palette of colours that can be displayed on screen.

The video format was approved earlier this month by member nations of the International Telecommunication Union, a standards and regulatory body agency of the United Nations, according to an official at NHK, Japan's public broadcasting station, and another at the Ministry of Internal Affairs and Communications. Both spoke on condition of anonymity.

To restore a sense of reality, I think Walt Disney should have a Hardluckland. -- Jack Paar