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+ - Humble Ebook Bundle passes the $1 million mark->

Submitted by
mouthbeef
mouthbeef writes "Just a few minutes before 10AM Pacific, the Humble Ebook Bundle crossed the $1 MILLION mark. Yes, it's an arbitrary round number, but it's a BIGGUN! For those of you who haven't clocked it, the Humble Ebook Bundle is a collection of 13 DRM-free ebooks — science fiction, fantasy, and graphic novels (including my latest, Pirate Cinema) — for which you can name your price, and designate some or all of your money to charity in the process. I'm over the danged MOON. You've got just about three days to get in on the deal before it vanishes!"
Link to Original Source
DRM

+ - Secret BBC documents reveal flimsy case for DRM->

Submitted by
mouthbeef
mouthbeef writes "The Guardian just published my investigative story on the BBC and Ofcom's abuse of secrecy laws to hide the reasons for granting permission for DRM on UK public broadcasts. The UK public overwhelmingly rejected the proposal, but Ofcom approved it anyway, saying they were convinced by secret BBC arguments that couldn't be published due to "commercial sensitivity." As the article shows, the material was neither sensitive nor convincing — a fact that Ofcom and the BBC tried to hide from the public."
Link to Original Source

Comment: Screws up transatlantic business (Score 5, Insightful) 554

by mouthbeef (#35266154) Attached to: UK Government Wants to Spring Ahead Two Hours

I'm a UK taxpayer and I conduct a lot of business with the US west coast. Presently, we're 8 hours apart for most of the year, and that means that I can *just barely* squeeze in a conference call with Californian colleagues (I'm co-owner of boingboing.net and all my partners are in LA and San Francisco) and still get out of the office in time to get my daughter from day-care and get home for dinner.

If the timezone difference goes to 9 hours, I'm buggered. The additional hour will have a direct, negative impact on my net income, as it will either require me to participate less in these transatlantic ventures (for example, it would probably mean no more freelance assignments for US editors, all of which generate UK taxes) or hire expensive babysitters to fetch the kid from day-care (something I also would rather not do for sentimental reasons having nothing to do with the economy).

Comment: Why let facts get in the way of a good smearjob? (Score 5, Informative) 437

by mouthbeef (#33066604) Attached to: What To Do About CC License Violations?

I'm the Boing Boing editor who posted the image that the OP claims violated the Creative Commons license.

Read the OP closely: he's not saying that it was *his* image I took -- rather, that he was affronted on behalf of the photographer.

Except that the photographer in this case is my friend and colleague Jennifer Trant, and I used the photo with her permission, and then reproduced the entire CC license so that other people would know what terms they could use it on.

So, anonymous poster: how about the next time you decide to smear someone for infringing Creative Commons in the name of defending someone's copyrights, you actually make sure that the creator hasn't authorized the use?

+ - Secret UK plan to appoint "Pirate Finder General"

Submitted by
mouthbeef
mouthbeef writes "A source very close to the UK Labour government just called me to leak the fact that Secretary of State Lord Mandelson is trying to sneak a revision into the Digital Economy Bill that would give him and his successors the power to create future copyright law without debate. Mandelson goes on to explain what he wants this for: so he can create private copyright militias with investigatory and enforcement powers, and so that he can create new copyright punishments as he sees fit (e.g., jail time, three strikes)."

Those who can, do; those who can't, simulate.

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