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Comment: Re:Yes MS has lost and is now nice (Score 1) 421

by motorsabbath (#48644653) Attached to: Ask Slashdot: Is an Open Source<nobr> <wbr></nobr>.NET Up To the Job?

I have to say it: I've been running Win7 Pro in a VM for 3 years now and it is, indeed, a stable desktop. I wish MS (Ballmer, prick) didn't screw it up and leave it behind. Our POS requires a Windows backend and Win7 is fine.

Running on a Debian host, of course. Still, not a bad desktop OS at all.

Comment: Good read, really enjoying it. (Score 1) 92

by motorsabbath (#48453705) Attached to: Book Review: Bulletproof SSL and TLS

It gives you plenty of information and tool descriptions to test your own setups as you put them together. This, to me, was always the hardest part. Building LibreSSL fro source for the hell of it is also useful if for no other reason than getting the updated man pages. Just sayin'.

This book + wireshark = very, very informative, esp. if your background is in hardware design and not networking...

AMD

AMD, NVIDIA, and Developers Weigh In On GameWorks Controversy 80

Posted by Soulskill
from the there-can-be-only-one-(or-more) dept.
Dputiger writes: "Since NVIDIA debuted its GameWorks libraries there's been allegations that they unfairly disadvantaged AMD users or prevented developers from optimizing code. We've taken these questions to developers themselves and asked them to weigh in on how games get optimized, why NVIDIA built this program, and whether its an attempt to harm AMD customers. 'The first thing to understand about [developer/GPU manufacturer] relations is that the process of game optimization is nuanced and complex. The reason AMD and NVIDIA are taking different positions on this topic isn't because one of them is lying, it’s because AMD genuinely tends to focus more on helping developers optimize their own engines, while NVIDIA puts more effort into performing tasks in-driver. This is a difference of degree — AMD absolutely can perform its own driver-side optimization and NVIDIA's Tony Tamasi acknowledged on the phone that there are some bugs that can only be fixed by looking at the source. ... Some of this difference in approach is cultural but much of it is driven by necessity. In 2012 (the last year before AMD's graphics revenue was rolled into the console business), AMD made about $1.4 billion off the Radeon division. For the same period, NVIDIA made more than $4.2 billion. Some of that was Tegra-related and it's a testament to AMD's hardware engineering that it competes effectively with Nvidia with a much smaller revenue share, but it also means that Team Green has far more money to spend on optimizing every aspect of the driver stack.'"

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