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Submission + - Linux receives 20th birthday video from Microsoft

moonbender writes: "The Linux kernel has received birthday wishes from an unexpected direction — a video animation from Microsoft. Quoting The H: The video picks up on the strained relationship between Microsoft and Linux by displaying the phrase "Microsoft Vs. Linux" and then showing Tux, the Linux mascot, turning his back on the offer of a birthday cake from Microsoft. After a brief outline of the history between Microsoft and Linux, the video ends with a conciliatory gesture: Tux accepts the birthday cake in his igloo and the video ends with "Happy Birthday" and the editing of the initial phrase to "Microsoft and Linux?". The Linux Foundation has more stuff celebrating the kernel's 20th birthday."

Submission + - Linux Chrome 7 might encrypt stored passwords

morsch writes: "Chrome 7 for Linux is planned to tie in with the Gnome Keyring and the KDE Wallet to securely store saved browser passwords. Users of the stable version of Google's Webkit-based browser might be surprised to find out that, so far, passwords are stored on the hard disk as clear text. On Windows, Chrome has always used a platform-specific crypto API call for encrypted storage. The corresponding Linux function was never implemented — until now. Unstable versions of Chrome 7 still disable the feature by default; it can be enabled using a parameter."
Operating Systems

Linux Supports More Devices Than Any Other OS 272

Linux Blog recommends an interview up on the O'Reilly site with Greg Kroah-Hartman, long-time Linux kernel hacker and the current Linux kernel maintainer for the USB driver core. He updates the free Linux driver program announced almost two years ago, which has really caught traction now with more than 300 developers volunteering. The interviewer begins by asking about Kroah-Hartman's claim that the Linux kernel now supports more devices than any other operating system ever has. "[One factor is] the ease of writing drivers; Linux drivers are at normally one-third smaller than Windows drivers or other operating system drivers. We have all the examples there, so it's trivial to write a new one if you have new hardware, usually because you can copy the code and go. We maintain them... forever, so the old ones don't disappear and we run on every single processor out there. I mean Linux is 80% of the world's top 500 super computers right now and we're also the number one embedded operating system today. We've got both sides of the market because it's — yeah it's pretty amazing. I don't know why, but we're doing something right."