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Comment: Amazon is pretty up-front about expected data loss (Score 1) 112

by molotov303 (#35972922) Attached to: Amazon EC2 Crash Caused Data Loss

Unless you pay extra, they say you can expect to lose data stored in S3 on a regular basis. There's nothing wrong with that per se, but it's something you need to plan for.

S3:

Designed to provide 99.99% durability and 99.99% availability of objects over a given year. This durability level corresponds to an average annual expected loss of 0.01% of objects.

http://aws.amazon.com/s3/

EBS:

...Amazon EBS snapshot can expect an annual failure rate (AFR) of between 0.1% - 0.5%, where failure refers to a complete loss of the volume.

http://aws.amazon.com/ebs/

Comment: Strange thing to celebrate... (Score -1, Flamebait) 124

by molotov303 (#35790542) Attached to: Celebrating Yuri Gagarin's 1961 Flight Into Space

Doesn't it seem strange to celebrate what was, after all, a major loss for our civilization? The fact that we lost both opening chapters of the space race (Sputnik 1 and Vostok 1) is a national shame, which should be burned into our memory to be sure, but celebrated? Hardly.

Celebrating the victories of our enemies is like spitting on the graves of the hundreds of thousands who died in the cold war.

Comment: Re:Jeopardy? Super bowl? Forth Down? (Score 1) 241

by molotov303 (#35412716) Attached to: Go For It On Fourth Down? Ask Coach Watson

http://slashdot.org/faq/editorial.shtml#ed850

Slashdot is U.S.-centric. We readily admit this, and really don't see it as a problem. Slashdot is run by Americans, after all, and the vast majority of our readership is in the U.S. We're certainly not opposed to doing more international stories, but we don't have any formal plans for making that happen. All we can really tell you is that if you're outside the U.S. and you have news, submit it, and if it looks interesting, we'll post it.

Toys

Home-made Helicopters in Nigeria 319

Posted by CmdrTaco
from the financed-entirely-by-dead-princes dept.
W33dz writes "A 24-year-old undergraduate from Nigeria is building helicopters out of old car and bike parts. Mubarak Muhammed Abdullahi, a physics student, spent eight months building the yellow model seen on yahoo or on Gizmodo using the money he makes from repairing cell phones and computers. While some of the parts have been sourced from a crashed 747, the chopper contains all sorts of surprises."
Businesses

Cisco Offices Raided, Execs Arrested In Brazil 537

Posted by kdawson
from the where's-my-white-hat dept.
Many readers are writing in about the raids and arrests in Brazil's Cisco operation. At least 40 people were arrested earlier today, and Brazilian authorities asked the US to issue arrest warrants for five more suspects in this country. The allegation is that Cisco brought at least $500M of equipment into Brazil without properly paying import duties, and now owes over $826M in taxes, fines, and interest.
Power

Radiation Absorbing Mineral Found In the Arctic 351

Posted by ScuttleMonkey
from the the-power-of-suck dept.
An anonymous reader writes "A mineral has recently been found that exhibits the astounding property of being able to remove radiation from water-based solutions. 'After coming into contact with the mineral, radioactive water becomes completely safe. Had this mineral been available to physicists after the Chernobyl or Three Mile Island disasters, the consequences might have been very different, as both accidents resulted in contamination from radioactive water.' Also, the article notes that although only grams of the material have been found, tons of it are needed; they are confident they could artificially reproduce it."
Businesses

Indian Software Firm Outsourcing Jobs To US 444

Posted by ScuttleMonkey
from the turnabout-is-fair-play dept.
phobos13013 writes "NPR is reporting Indian software maker Wipro is outsourcing positions to a development office opening in Atlanta, Georgia. Although it sounds good for US job growth, the implication is that firms outside the US appear to be dominating more and more in the global economy, even from developing and underdeveloped regions of the world. Similarly, salaries of IT professionals world-wide are projected to stagnate or possibly fall due to the large pool of qualified applicants in the market today."
Data Storage

Hynix 48-GB Flash MCP 129

Posted by kdawson
from the lotta-songs-in-yer-phone dept.
Hal_Porter writes to let us know that the third-largest NAND chip maker, Hynix, has announced they have stacked 24 flash chips in a 1.4mm thick multi-chip package. It's not entirely clear from the article whether the resulting 48-GB device is a proof of concept or a product. The article extrapolates to 384 GB of storage in a single package, sometime. Hal_Porter adds: "It's not clear if it's possible to write to them in parallel — if so the device should be pretty damn fast. The usual objection to NAND flash as a hard drive replacement is lifetime. NAND sectors can only be written 100,000 times or so before they wear out, but wear leveling can be done to spread writes evenly over at least each chip. I worked out that the lifetime should be much longer than a typical magnetic hard disk. There's no information on costs yet frankly and it sounds like an expensive proof of concept, but it shows you the sort of device that will take over from small hard disks in the next few years."
Space

Study: Martian Soil Has Signs of Life 382

Posted by samzenpus
from the look-again dept.
geoffrobinson writes "Reuters is reporting that a scientist from Germany believes Viking probe data shows signs of life. From the article: "Joop Houtkooper of the University of Giessen, Germany, said on Friday the spacecraft may in fact have found signs of a weird life form based on hydrogen peroxide on the subfreezing, arid Martian surface. His analysis of one of the experiments carried out by the Viking spacecraft suggests that 0.1 percent of the Martian soil could be of biological origin.""
Displays

U of CA Constructs 220 Million Pixel Display 145

Posted by samzenpus
from the wider-than-wide-screen dept.
eldavojohn writes "Engineers at the University of California, San Diego have built a 220 million pixel display across 55 high-resolution tiled screens. Linked via optical fiber to Calit2's building at UC Irvine, the display can deliver real-time rendered graphics simultaneously across 420 million pixels to audiences in Irvine and San Diego."
Education

MIT Focuses on Chip Optimization 30

Posted by CowboyNeal
from the quality-control dept.
eldavojohn writes "MIT's Microsystems Technology Laboratories is focusing on the manufacturing of chips as the variables that affect chip quality become more and more influential. From one of the researchers, "The extremely high speeds of these circuits make them very sensitive to both device and interconnect parameters. The circuit may still work, but with the nanometer-scale deviations in geometry, capacitance or other material properties of the interconnect, these carefully tuned circuits don't operate together at the speed they're supposed to achieve.""
United States

"Tubes" Senator Being Investigated For Corruption 613

Posted by kdawson
from the cozy-relationships dept.
DragonTHC writes "Senator Ted Stevens, Republican of Alaska, is being investigated in a federal corruption probe that has implicated his son Ben. Part of the case involves a fishing co-op whose members allegedly paid Ben Stevens $500,000 to get a federal bailout from his father." The other Alaskan senator, also a Republican, is under a cloud as well.

Comment: Gives away your position (Score 1) 236

by molotov303 (#18322065) Attached to: Patent Filed for Underwater GPS

signal cannot reach the satellite from a submersible

GPS uses one-way communication, so there is never a need for a signal to reach a satellite. This is also the reason no one who operates a submersible on it's own (where it would need positioning data) would ever use this service. You would have to give away your position, and if you were willing to do that you would surface and use GPS.

I judge a religion as being good or bad based on whether its adherents become better people as a result of practicing it. - Joe Mullally, computer salesman

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