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Comment: TacoBell Winner (Score 3, Funny) 225

by modestgeek (#39128295) Attached to: PSVita Released In the USA and Europe
The only reason I have one is because I won it from TacoBell. I can't even use some of the features because I don't have a PS3. None of my old PSP games will work on it (even the downloadable ones). None of my friends with a PS3 are interested in buying it from me at half MSRP... :(

http://unlock.tacobell.com/?utm_campaign=PSVita2012

Comment: Re:Zombies in Ohio... (Score 2) 219

by modestgeek (#37895842) Attached to: Ohio Emergency Responders Stage Mock Zombie Invasion
That's a pretty good protocol given the recent development and marketing of products to help protect you from zombies. Zombie Max is ammunition by Hornady.

Disclaimer: Hornady® Zombie Max ammunition is NOT a toy (IT IS LIVE AMMUNITION), but is intended only to be used onZOMBIES, also known as the living dead, undead, etc. No human being, plant, animal, vegetable or mineral should ever be shot with Hornady® Zombie Max ammunition. Again, we repeat, Hornady® Zombie Max ammunition is for use on ZOMBIES ONLY, and that's not a nickname, phrase or cute way of referring to anybody, place or thing. When we say Zombies, we meanZOMBIES!

http://www.hornady.com/ammunition/zombiemax

Comment: url lookups (Score 3, Informative) 143

by modestgeek (#37745716) Attached to: Britain's Broadband Censors: a Bunch of Students
I could care less who is doing the categorization. There are going to be mistakes. The important thing is being able to challenge the rating. Most of these content filtering products have URL category lookup and you can report sites that need further review.

McAfee http://www.trustedsource.org/en/feedback/url
BlueCoat http://sitereview.bluecoat.com/sitereview.jsp

The rest are easily found via google or from their respective support sites.

Comment: NetDot (Network Documentation Tool project) (Score 1) 314

by modestgeek (#37527654) Attached to: Ask Slashdot: Successful Software From Academia?
I've been using a Network Documentation Tool (Netdot) for a while now. It is still in active development but certainly useful. It can easily be adapted to networks outside of academia. They implement feature requests pretty often too. https://osl.uoregon.edu/redmine/projects/netdot/wiki

Comment: Not fragmentation, just maturing. (Score 1) 315

by modestgeek (#32318780) Attached to: Fragmentation vs. Obsolescence In the Android Ecosphere
I personally don't see this as fragmentation, just maturing. These last couple of updates are just finally getting around to the features that users really wanted from the beginning. FULL exchange support, tethering, hotspot, multitouch, etc. These are all features that users wanted from experiences with other phones but Android didn't have full support for.

The problem will be when you can't upgrade the OS because of hardware related reasons within 6 months. Someone who signs a 2 year contract expects that phone to last 1.5-2 years. You can't just go in and upgrade your phone and get the deal price because you haven't completed your contract. Some vendors let you trade in early. Or, if you purchase the phone outright for $500 with no contract, having to shell out another $500 6 months later to get features that should already be there would really suck. Fortunately, the hardware specs on the majority of these newer devices should last at least 2 years IMO.

Comment: good publicity and great value (Score 1) 238

by modestgeek (#32174946) Attached to: Indie Pay-What-You-Want Bundle Reaches $1 Million
I ended up purchasing these games all for $50. I had never heard of any of them prior to seeing this on SD. I've only downloaded/installed and played a little bit of World of Goo and doubt I'll have much time to download and play any of the others. I was originally going to offer less knowing that I only would be able to play one but I felt cheap knowing that this was also a fundraiser.

Comment: Re:Do power users abuse their IT knowledge? (Score 1) 460

by modestgeek (#30632822) Attached to: Do IT Pros Abuse Their Power?
In our company it's as simple as opening up a ticket. Submit your request as well as your reason and in almost 100% of the cases it gets approved and the proxy/firewall policy gets changed to permit whatever it was you wanted. It goes along the lines of deny all to start and then start allowing as things are needed. It's security 101. Now, if you submit a ticket asking for request to some obvious non work related site (p2p, gambling, pr0n, etc.) its going to get blocked. Otherwise we are very reasonable. We've had requests come though to allow users to listen to their online media subscriptions (sirius) or Zune. Doesn't mean I'm going to allow users to start downloading music via torrent or emule.

Comment: Re:Do power users abuse their IT knowledge? (Score 1, Insightful) 460

by modestgeek (#30632598) Attached to: Do IT Pros Abuse Their Power?
I don't understand why people always try to "get around" these restrictions. If there is a legitimate business need, then get it approved. These preventions are put in place for a reason. The more open the network, the more risk. The more risk means more virus, trojans, botnets, data leakage, etc. IT then has to cleanup your mess.

Besides, SSH tunnels won't work on my network. I've got all protocols being intercepted by the proxy (including encrypted). Then an application firewall behind that to make sure the proxy is doing it's job. Social networking is blocked. End of story. And yes, management backs me.

Want to screw off at work? Get an smartphone and do it on your own device. Get a netbook with an aircard. I don't give a fsck what you do at work. It's not my job to make sure you're spending your time wisely. However, it is my job to protect our computers/network and I do that by blocking "risky" sites.

Comment: Re:8.8.8.8/4 (Score 1) 540

by modestgeek (#30323216) Attached to: Google Launches Public DNS Resolver
Any sysadmin who is in charge of said filtering is likely blocking all DNS servers at the firewall and only allowing their DNS servers to perform outbound requests. And/or intercepting DNS requests at the transparent proxy and forwarding them to their internal DNS servers which are authorized to perform outbound requests. Not to mention that you need admin privileges to change the DNS servers on your NIC. If you're thinking rogue DHCP server, they can be blocked rather easily using DHCP snooping on the switch.

Comment: Re:It's working great for me (Score 1) 465

by modestgeek (#29591417) Attached to: Microsoft Security Essentials Released; Rivals Mock It
Agreed. I've been running AV free (that is without av) for at least 2 years on my XP Pro home workstation. I periodically scan my system with ClamAV portable or similar and I've found no evidence of infection. I just practice safe computing. Running as a non admin account and safe surfing with Firefox. I'm not suggesting that others should do this, but it just goes to show that simple basic measures can remove most risk of virus/spyware infection.

What is mind? No matter. What is matter? Never mind. -- Thomas Hewitt Key, 1799-1875

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