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Submission + - DRM Torpedos Keurig Stock 1

An anonymous reader writes: Green Mountain (Keurig) stock dropped by 10% this morning after a brutal earnings report. The reason? CNN Money reports that DRM has weakened sales of their Keurig 2.0. CEO Brian Kelley admits, "Quite honestly, we were wrong."

Submission + - Superfish Injects Ads In One In 25 Google Page Views (itworld.com)

itwbennett writes: Google, along with researchers from the University of California at Berkeley and Santa Barbara, analyzed over 102 million page views to Google sites between June and September last year. They found that over five percent of browser visits to Google owned websites, including Google Search, are altered by computer programs that inject ads into pages. One called Superfish is responsible for a majority of those ad injections.

Submission + - Microsoft ends war on employees, stops Stacked Ranking (geekwire.com)

onyxruby writes: Microsoft has decided to end the war on their own employees and had made the decision to end Stack Ranking. At long last Microsoft employees will be able to focus on the their job and performance instead of everyone else. Stacked Ranking has long been blamed for holding back Microsoft from any number of markets and has arguably cost Microsoft billions of dollars in lost opportunities. This could arguably be even more important for the turnaround of Microsoft than the removal of Steve Ballmer and the recently instituted corporate reorganization.

Comment Re:Mobile Home or Trailer? (Score 1) 237

All depends on you. A class "A" rig with a "toad" (towed behind car) is good for a lot of people who fulltime because hooking and unhooking is easier. However, a 1 ton pickup with a fifth wheel is also a nice solution, especially if the RV will be parked for longer periods of time (fewer things to maintain on a trailer than a motorcoach).

If you like getting away from it all, a truck camper (some truck campers like the Chalet ones have multiple slideouts, and can give more usable inside space than travel trailers) or a "toy hauler" travel trailer may be the thing.

Lots of different RV types, as no two people are alike.

Comment Re:ISPs only (Score 1) 236

Another scenario is Google being bought out, selling gmail to someone else, or going out of business. This doesn't seem possible right now, but it might happen, as climates change in the industry. This means that the E-mail files are still there, but the SLAs signed are null and void. So the next company down the line could easily sell that info to anyone who wants or even create a large torrent archive for anyone to download.

What really is needed are regulations on how E-mail is stored, and the regulations will still hold even if the provider changes hands, goes out of businesses and the assets picked up from a liquidation sale, or the company just wants to shut down its doors. It is like bank records -- banks can change hands, but it doesn't mean that they can publish all the balances of their users on their public website.

Comment Doubt it (Score 1, Troll) 282

Seems more likely that what will happen is that all "normal users" get RFC1918 IPv4 addresses.

So you could have say 1000 to 2000 ISP users behind one ISP public IPv4 address, which will be shared to access the Internet. One /8 public IPv4 range can then serve 16 to 32 billion users.

Stuff like WoW, google, facebook, gmail, IM will still work.

But running a public server, Bittorrent and other P2P stuff will be difficult. If you are lucky the ISP might allow you to serve to peers within each RFC1918 "district".

The Media Companies and Powers-That-Be might consider this a feature and not a problem. Since this means locking in to a world of few talkers and many listeners.

Comment Re:What about the presumption of innocence? (Score 1) 1590

So the Federal rights that citizens have from the constitution is 'right to not be denied the vote based on certain criteria' and 'right to run for Federal office'. That's it. All other rights apply to 'People', or they simply state what the government can't do, presumably to anyone.

These are more about privileges extended to citizens, rather than inalienable rights that can't be taken away from a person. Since citizenship can be revoked (although it doesn't happen often to natural born citizens), it follows that those privileges are also forfeited.

The concept of citizenship is really about taking extra steps to become involved in the politics and responsibilities of the country. In doing this, the country affords the citizen additional privileges above and beyond a visitor or non-citizen resident. These days, many people seem rather apathetic to the responsibility side of the citizenship bargain, and spend their efforts whining that non-citizens (ie. immigrants) are mostly treated equally as evidenced by the GGP post.

In my opinion, a citizen does not just have the 'right' to vote, but instead has the 'responsibility' to vote (which would controversially also imply a 'requirement'). Why bother maintaining a person's citizenship if they don't want to participate in the country's operation? I see numerous posts where people talk about voting being a waste of time, or describing a dozen ways to 'get out of jury duty'.

It's simple really, if you don't want to participate, then you get demoted to the status of 'permanent resident'. Unfortunately, these days the word 'citizen' seems to be synonymous with 'permanent resident that doesn't have to do anything to avoid being kicked out of the country'. IMO, citizenship should mean so much more than that.

Comment Re:It should read 'stoopid people hath spoken' (Score 1) 982

The law was explicitly written with the idea of extortionware in mind - "I have your computer system & I'm not giving it back unless you pay me." or massive DDOS attacks. The city decided that the wording could be stretched to include not giving up a password after you've been fired, and the jury agreed with them.
Was he guilty of 'tampering' under any rational definition- absolutely not.
Did he deny them access - to be honest I don't think it's appropriate to say yes from a technical standpoint, however that's the problem that specialists face when dealing with juries - they don't understand nor care to, the specifics of the job.

Comment Re:I don't know (Score 2, Insightful) 369

Linux is simply not realistic in a regular office environment.

I work at a non tech company with a lot of average Jane's and Joe's.
We are talking about people who reboot their machine if tech-support tells them to restart a certain program. We are talking about people who don't know the difference between a url and a email adress. Cut/copy and paste is witchcraft. These people are good at what they do as long as the tools they have to work with just work.

If shit hits the fan they are lost. If after a update button X is moved to another menu or simply 100 pixels to the right hell breaks loose.
Now imagine what would happen if their "computer" doesn't look like the "computer" they are used to seeing at home and everywhere else. Production wouldn't slow down, it would do a full emergency stop, handbrake with smoking and screaming tires...

And this is what a lot of nerds like "us" tend to forget a lot of the time.
There are vast amounts of people out there who don't get computers, os-es and software. It's a tool and it should work, period. They don't care how it works, even if they did they wouldn't understand it because they have no feeling for it.

Comment Re: Uh... contradictory? (Score 1) 1590

Just to piss you people off, we should open the borders.

The reason we have had a leaky border essentially forever is that lots of powerful people like having it that way. Look at how many politicians have ranted against illegal aliens and then been found out to be hiring the same for household work.

The status quo is essentially integrated into our economy.

Arizona has a special problem with the marauders, but I don't think this law is going to fix that.

Sad to say, I don't know what *will* fix it. Probably the best thing would be to legalize dope and cut the bottom out of the black market. But that ain't going to happen.

Comment Re:The real problem... (Score 1) 1131

Turkey isn't a religion. His point stands and is true, it went under a reverse reformation going to a more extremist version(being pushed by Saudi Arabia); which has been pushed for the last 120ish odd years as the only pure voice of islam. The other 2 main religions of the trinity however went through their enlightenment phase where people said "this is stupid" and the churches/synagogues agreed.

Comment Re:Is it me or is he sounding more desperate? (Score 1) 733

The fact that people even argue about this says much about the human psyche...

You are assuming too much. Maybe I'm a bot.

In any case, it's not that I'm the world's greatest games fan, I just despise movies. They have neither the plot depth and character development of a book, nor the rich interactive experience of even the most primitive arcade game.

Movie directors have it easy. You just take a book written by an actual artist, make a very short summary by removing all the thought and development and compress the entire plot into a 90 minute series of highlights. Then add some boobies and an explosion or two.

The director of a game has to create an interactive experience, in which an element will be placed that he cannot control or predict: the player. Consider the number of possibilities in Pacman: you can go up, down, left and right. You can eat a dot or a cherry, you can be eaten by a ghost, or after you've eaten another thingie you can eat a ghost. Now consider the number of possibilities in Citizen Cane: you sit on your butt and watch.

Movies have been completely superseded by TV and games. It's time we stop wasting time and money on this creatively long dead passive mass entertainment of the previous century.

Comment Re:NOT acceptable!!! (Score 1) 299

LOL, my idea of computer security is keeping my tools up to date instead of getting pissed off about having to upgrade my antivirus.

No, you're idea is to allow your antivirus provider to install a kill switch on your system. I'm not arguing against upgrading or doing so in a timely manner, but when it comes to security being a sheep will get you eaten by wolves. That is exactly what you're doing.

The trouble with money is it costs too much!