Follow Slashdot stories on Twitter

 



Forgot your password?
typodupeerror

Comment: My personal experiences aren't that bad (Score 1) 1040

by mlgm (#29627231) Attached to: Did Chicago Lose Olympic Bid Due To US Passport Control?

I'm not really a frequent visitor to the U.S., but I've been there a couple of times as a tourist and I can say, my personal experiences aren't that bad. The unfriendliest welcome was when I was entering by car from Canada about 20 years ago but even that wasn't so bad, just a little annoying. The last times I entered through Houston and Washington D.C. and the custom officers were friendly as have been most Americans we met (if not all).

About the Olympics, Chicago would probably be a great city for Olympics, but I wouldn't believe custom procedures to be a major factor in the decision. I rather believe it's about the first games in South America.

Comment: Look at OWASP for Top 10 security vulnerabilities (Score 5, Informative) 195

by mlgm (#26794271) Attached to: Website Security Without Breaking the Bank?

The Open Web Application Security Project (OWASP) has a Top 10 list, which lists the most serious web application vulnerabilities, discusses how to protect against them, and provides links to more information (http://www.owasp.org/index.php/Category:OWASP_Top_Ten_Project). This might be a good start.

Patents

McDonalds Files To Patent Making a Sandwich 346

Posted by kdawson
from the mayo-gets-its-own-claim dept.
I Don't Believe in Imaginary Property writes "McDonalds has applied for patent WO2006068865, which carries the title 'METHOD AND APPARATUS FOR MAKING A SANDWICH.' John Montagu, the fourth Earl of Sandwich, can eat his heart out (unless that's been patented, too). Undoubtedly, some people are contemplating whether there's anything novel in this patent that is somehow obscured by its generic title. Feel free to examine their flowchart for yourself and see exactly how novel their sandwich 'subroutines' are. The good news is that, given that it only mentions generic sandwich making 'tool(s),' rather than any specific machine, it might not survive after the In Re Bilski decision, which was meant to put a stop to absurdities such as this. But until McDonalds's application is rejected or invalidated, make sure you don't use their flowchart when making sandwiches. After all, if you 'apply appropriate condiments to appropriate compartment,' you might infringe upon their IP."

Comment: FutureOS might make computers more responsive (Score 3, Interesting) 278

by mlgm (#17952778) Attached to: Where Are Operating Systems Headed?
I believe (or at least I hope) that the future of operating systems does not lie in fancier user interfaces, but in making the computer more responsive.

Do you know that today's computers are really fast? I mean, those GHz processors are incredibly fast, it is unbelievable what they are able to do in a second. But you might not know it from just using a computer.

In my daily work I often receive very slow responses from both Windows and Linux machines. I often have to wait seconds for things that should (and could) be instant. I mean after the screen saver on my desktop machine locks the screen, the next user request invariably will be to unlock it. The OS should know that. And it should sit there waiting for any sign that its master wants to work again and then it should instantly present the password dialog.

Or what about those apps where I have to look for seconds at animated splash screens saying that they load this or that module or plugin. Why can't the OS provide means for loading pre-initialized applications (some folks might remember the undump utility).

There are possible performance improvements all over the place, which could be achieved by using techniques like caching or using database technology or being able to hint to the operating system which ressources might be needed next. Together with maybe a little more RAM this could create a really reactive user experience.

I often wonder how you can spend so much money for creating software and come up with such bad and slow design :-).

Take an astronaut to launch.

Working...