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Privacy

FTC Proposes Do Not Track List For the Web 173

Posted by samzenpus
from the don't-follow dept.
An anonymous reader writes "The Federal Trade Commission proposed allowing consumers to opt out of having their online activities tracked on Wednesday as part of the agency's preliminary report on consumer privacy. FTC chairman Jon Leibowitz said he would prefer for the makers of popular web browsers to come up with a setting on their own that would allow consumers to opt out of having their browsing and search habits tracked."

Comment: no no no, you're thinking of osama bin laden (Score 1) 1425

by mistahkurtz (#34407684) Attached to: Sarah Palin 'Target WikiLeaks Like Taliban'
not al-qaeda and the taliban.

that means we should go after them, do some damage but never actually catch/destroy wikileaks, make it more popular with "commonfolk" in poor parts of the world, and kill hundreds of thousands of civilians in the process.

then, in a few years, wikileaks can release the wikigate docs, revealing the staggering civilian death toll caused by US troops in the quest to bring down julian assange and wikileaks.

we could probably tap the defense industry for some high-dollar, high-tech, high-fail-rate crap. and we probably need more security on the internet anyway, to combat the growing threat that wikileaks poses to the american way of life.

Comment: not a fair question (Score 1) 420

by mistahkurtz (#33076202) Attached to: Internal Costs Per Gigabyte — What Do You Pay?
it's really not a fair question.

some may be paying more, or yours may be high depending upon what your storage infrastructure looks like.

are you on HP EVA or XP storage? IBM SVC?

or do you just use some basic gig-e SAN, or DAS/NAS?

let's start there, and then let's talk about how your storage works. is it tiered, is it smart, is it redundant? how important is some of the data? what type of contracts do you have in place? what is your storage plugging into, and how?

answer these questions, and give your question some context.
Networking

Brazilian Court Bans P2P Software 216

Posted by Soulskill
from the next-up-cars-and-cheeseburgers dept.
Earlier this year, at the behest of an anti-piracy group consisting of the usual suspects from the recording industry, a Brazilian court ruled that a company named Cadare Information Technology must implement a filter on the P2P software they distributed on their website to weed out copyrighted content. Cadare was unable comply with the order because they didn't develop the software; they merely offered it for download. The case went back to court, and a Brazilian judge has now decided to ban distribution of the software because it can be used to assist copyright infringement. "He went on to suggest that any website offering the software alongside advertising (i.e, trying to profit from offering it) would be committing a crime, punishable by between two and four years in jail."

Comment: great! (?) (Score 1) 67

by mistahkurtz (#29375401) Attached to: Liposuction Leftovers Make Easy Stem Cells
so we should expect to see yet more encouragement of people to take the easy way out and not behave like responsible human beings? yes. i'm totally ignoring people predisposed to obesity due to genetic ailments. but really. now that we have this information (and great though it is), what are the ramifications? subsidized liposuction? do what you want, don't pay for it with your health (at least up front), and everything's cool?
Media

iPod Fee Proposed For Canada 414

Posted by timothy
from the when-organized-interests-meet-diffuse-ones dept.
innocent_white_lamb writes "The Canadian Private Copying Collective is pushing for the implementation of an iPod fee in Canada to compensate them for 'losses' when people copy music to their digital music players. They have collected a fee from every CDR sold in Canada since 1997 and now want to extend that to digital music players. From the article: 'Some have argued that once they buy a CD they shouldn't have to pay again and again to listen to those songs — which they already purchased — on a personal compilation CD or on their MP3 player. But for people like Milman and Basskin, it's about recognizing the value of those works. "There has to be some sort of way to compensate the artist for the hours and the sweat and the blood and the tears and the extreme, extreme expense that goes into making music," Milman said.'"

Comment: Re:Lets try to be a bit more supportive here! (Score 1) 487

by mistahkurtz (#29295247) Attached to: Build Your Own $2.8M Petabyte Disk Array For $117k
i don't disagree fully, but the difference here is that it's a business. if someone came out and said here's a $2m storage array for your house(!), we'd all scream and laugh and point fingers.

since it's a business, and (especially in this case) the storage array in question is a basic and required tool for the business to function, it doesn't seem to make sense for them to skimp on it.

what they came up with is cool. but that's not the issue. the issue is yet another (in this case small/startup) company saying "we're going to do X!!!" and then realizing "oh, shit it costs how much to do X right?" and then saying "fuck it here's some hard drives*".

* can be substituted for pirated copies of whatever software, PDF creator when they need Acrobat Pro, or whatever skimpy solution many companies employ because they're not willing to shell out the $$ for the cost of doing business.
NASA

NASA May Outsource 219

Posted by kdawson
from the let-a-thousand-rockets-bloom dept.
The Wall Street Journal is running a piece about the growing momentum behind the idea of NASA outsourcing to private companies everything from transporting astronauts to ferrying cargo into orbit. Quoting: "Proposals gaining momentum in Washington call for contractors to build and run competing systems under commercial contracts, according to federal officials, aerospace-industry officials and others familiar with the discussions. While the Obama administration is still mulling options and hasn't made any final decisions, such a move would represent a major policy shift away from decades of government-run rocket and astronaut-transportation programs such as the current space-shuttle fleet. ... In the face of severe federal budget constraints and a burgeoning commercial-space industry eager to play a larger role in exploring the solar system and perhaps beyond, ...a consensus for the new approach seems to be building inside the White House as well as [NASA]. ... Under this scenario, a new breed of contractors would take over many of NASA's current responsibilities, freeing the agency to pursue longer-term, more ambitious goals such as new rocket-propulsion technology and manned missions to Mars. ...[T]hese contractors would take the lead in servicing the International Space Station from the shuttle's planned retirement around 2011 through at least the end of that decade."
The Internet

First American Internet Addiction Treatment Center 278

Posted by timothy
from the cure-for-what-doesn't-quite-ail-ye dept.
An anonymous reader writes "Taking their lead from China, two Americans have opened the first US-based Internet Addiction treatment center in Fall City, Wash. — ironically close to Redmond (Microsoft's hometown). The center, called reStart: Internet Addiction Recovery Program, is a 45-day treatment center where, for a steep set of fees, people can be cured of their addiction to the Web. After paying the $200 application fee, addicts are charged $14,500 for the 45 days, an additional $800 for a screening, and more for extra services, like kayaking ($1,575)."
Medicine

US Life Expectancy May Have Peaked 1053

Posted by timothy
from the so-lose-some-weight-and-eat-some-spinach dept.
Hugh Pickens writes "Live Science reports that although life expectancy in the United States has risen to an all-time high of 77.9 years in 2007 up from 77.7 in 2006, gains in life expectancy may be pretty much over, as some groups — particularly people in rural locations are already stagnating or slipping in contrast to all other industrialized nations. Hardest hit are regions in the Deep South, along the Mississippi River, in Appalachia and also the southern part of the Midwest reaching into Texas. The culprits — largely preventable with better diet and access to medical services — are diabetes, cancers and heart disease caused by smoking, high blood pressure and obesity. What the new analysis reveals is the reality of two Americas, one on par with most of Europe and parts of Asia, and another no different than a third-world nation with the United States placing 41st on the 2008 CIA World Factbook list, behind Bosnia but still edging out Albania. 'Beginning in the early 1980s and continuing through 1999 those who were already disadvantaged did not benefit from the gains in life expectancy experienced by the advantaged, and some became even worse off,' says a report published in PLoS Medicine by a team led by Harvard's Majid Ezzati, adding that 'study results are troubling because an oft-stated aim of the US health system is the improvement of the health of "all people, and especially those at greater risk of health disparities.'"

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