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Comment: Re:Anthropometrics (Score 1) 819

by mishehu (#47857065) Attached to: 3 Recent Flights Make Unscheduled Landings, After Disputes Over Knee Room
I'm not sure what planet you're from, but I've been flying on planes since I was barely even walking and talking. There is *nothing* rude about reclining, neither explicit nor implied. It is, however, nice and courteous to the person behind you to recline slowly and gently if at all possible. You do not have a right to not have the seat in front of you recline. You *do* have a right to control whether your own seat reclines.

Comment: Re:My opinion on the matter. (Score 1) 826

by mishehu (#47751601) Attached to: Choose Your Side On the Linux Divide

I think that's a little bit of oversimplification. I've yet to see what systemd does so much better than traditional init or sysvinit style other than make a clusterf*ck out of everything... Maybe it's "I've been working 20 years with something. It might not be perfect, but the alternative seems to be at least an order of magnitude worse than what I currently have."

As for service monitoring, there are other options out there than you can use to replace init or mix into your init system to handle that... such as runit.

Comment: Re:My opinion on the matter. (Score 1) 826

by mishehu (#47751557) Attached to: Choose Your Side On the Linux Divide
Me thinks it needs to keep working at it. I am an old guard - I still use Slackware - so I require some actual evidence of it solving a problem. I'd rather just replace my init with runit... At least it doesn't require a bunch of dependencies which I may not want on a system to perform service monitoring.

Comment: Re:SHeriff Michael Gayer (Score 1) 875

by mishehu (#47200049) Attached to: America 'Has Become a War Zone'

It saves them money and makes use of existing stuff instead of having to build new.

No. No. And again, No. It's cheaper if we just electrocute to death everybody ever found guilty of a crime. Why don't we just electrocute them all instead of having to build those big, expensive prisons and feed people? Hell, does it even matter that they're guilty of having forgotten to pay for their livestock purchase within 24 hours?

When it comes to the police, cheaper is not necessarily better. I would rather not have police plowing through mine or my neighbor's door with an MRAP. We aren't in a war zone, the police aren't the military, and there is zero justification to make everybody feel like we're living without rights and freedoms under martial law. Some studies have shown that when police are less aggressive (possible even not carrying guns) and laws are toned down from the "let's be tough on crime and send people away to jail for 10 years for carrying around a little dead leaf in their pocket", that violence between the police and the populace also goes down.

Accountants and MBA's tend to be only concerned with financial costs and ignore the other, real costs. Surely you're not one of those? :-)

Comment: Re:ya (Score 1) 282

Just because "top eyeball network providers agree" doesn't mean it's fact either. This isn't the old PSTN where carriers got paid to terminate a call from another carrier destined for your own subscribers. That model worked because that was very much so a push-model (caller on other provider calls you, you didn't send the first ring to get that entity to connect to your). The Internet in general doesn't work that way, sorry to break it to you. It is, by and in large, a pull model.

Comment: Re:Estate Taxes (Score 2) 300

You might want to read up upon the relevant laws and see that things can vary from jurisdiction to jurisdiction. The transfer of property and finances from a deceased parent to a minor surviving child who has no other living parent might not be penalized at all. Also, I don't think it's typical for a surviving spouse to have to pay estate taxes, and especially wouldn't have to in a community property state.

Comment: Re:Cult (Score 1) 431

by mishehu (#46420567) Attached to: Jewish School Removes Evolution Questions From Exams
Even the Haredi community is more diverse than one might expect. I know several Haba"d members who are quite active on the Internet. Some of those Haba"d members enjoy popular culture and movies, and some will only ever watch whatever they deem to be educational only. I am not finding the specific affiliation for this school, so for all I know it could be Neturey Karta - in which case, nothing about them would surprise me (they spit on 8 year old girls for being "immodestly dressed").

Comment: Re:Flu Shots are Ruining Vaccinations (Score 1) 482

by mishehu (#46403297) Attached to: Pro-Vaccination Efforts May Be Scaring Wary Parents From Shots

...and yet there is no one single vaccine for the entire influenza virus family. Thus even getting the vaccine can be completely useless, and needs to be given seasonally even. And even if you're not immunocompromised, if you have egg allergies that can be a problem too.

And then let's not forget the whole "I'm healthy and young..." argument brought up by the GP... Spanish Flu about 100 years ago killed predominantly young, healthy adults.

Comment: Re:Reduce usage - pay more (Score 1) 362

We're still in very bad drought in central Texas. But the common areas of many communities and the golf courses (I think we have 1 single one in the area) usually receive water for their grass from reclaimed (post-sewage treatment). I don't know if that reclaimed water is potable beyond the "water the grass" but it sure beats using fresh supply. But on the same note: wtf do we have this ridiculous obsession with grass anyway? Most of these grasses are unsuitable for this climate yet so many HOA's in the area *require* grass.

Comment: Re:well i'm reassured! (Score 3, Interesting) 393

by mishehu (#46128249) Attached to: Confessions Of an Ex-TSA Agent: Secrets Of the I.O. Room

I call BS on much of your post.

I can smell plenty of it coming from your post as well.

Umm, on many of the highways I drive on in the U.S., when the oncoming traffic is placed closer (without a significant median), there are guardrails. If it's even closer, there's a concrete or double concrete barrier. You can argue that maybe we need more barriers, but engineers clearly use these solutions in many places in the U.S. when conditions warrant it.

There are *vast* stretches of highway that are just as the GP described them - completely and without any barriers other than the median. Apparently you have driven on a select few roads in this country. I've driven many very long distance trips, and about the only region I have yet to drive through is the PacNorthwest.

There's something called "adjust your driving to conditions." You simply can't always go the posted speed limit in heavy rain.

Thanks, Captain Obvious. I think the GP already stated "while driving the posted speed limit or less". I've hydroplaned at speeds of 15 mph in extremely heavy flow on I-35 near Dallas. Do you think either I or the GP continued to drive at that speed?

For normal traffic, there's no need to travel at 80 mph. In fact, it reduces gas mileage usually to go significantly above 55 or so, because air resistance increases much more rapidly and you have to fight that at high speeds.

Cite your sources for this often repeated tripe. My own MPG continues to rise until it peaks when my speed exceeds 110 mph. Most any car that I've owned (and none of them were your big honking pointless SUVs or any other sort of passenger truck) continued to increase in performance up to at least 80 mph. Even in the case of a Toyota Prius, the efficiency won't peak until approximately 75 mph. This statistic that you quote is a relic of the 1970's oil embargo years and the types of cars typically driven at that time. I somehow doubt it even applies to diesel big rigs these days either.

As for why speed limits are what they are, I'm sure there are SOME places in the U.S. where they are politically motivated... corruption is everywhere.

Probably a non-trivial number. Remember, there are many places where the police will harass and/or arrest a private citizen who visibly warns drivers that they are approaching a speed trap. If safety was the real motivation, then the police would not harass people like this. But instead it's about the money.

The human body has physiological reactions to traveling. On an open highway, with little to look at, the sound, vibrations, and general motions of the vehicle tends to lull people into relaxation and sleep at speeds around 55 mph. At speeds approaching 80 mph, everything about the vehicle tends to key the occupants into full alertness. Except for known unsafe areas, the interstates would be much SAFER with higher speed limits.

What the heck are you talking about? Citation needed. Maybe in cars from 25 years ago or in your giant truck.

To the best of my knowledge, the increase in speed limit in TX over the years did not see a significant increase in accidents or fatalities. There are plenty of roads with posted limits as high as 80 and I think even SH 130 toll has 85 even.

In most modern cars, putting the cruise control on at high speeds will result in people relaxing... it doesn't matter whether you're going 55 or 65 or 80.

Citation please.

In any case, even if there were some minor benefit in terms of alertness at 80 mph, it would largely be trumped by the vast increases of kinetic energy that happen as you go faster at high speeds -- which means a subsequent significantly greater time and effort to stop safely... or greater energy thrown into collision scenarios, which means it's more likely for injury.

You're pretty much street pizza at speeds greater than 60mph. The risk of bodily injury and the mortality rate increase from a speed of 60 mph to 80 mph is such a small number that you can consider it a foregone conclusion that you're not coming home in one piece or at all.

While the GP was describing a lot of the symptoms of the problem, the major problems with our roads are:

1. The auto industry pushed for a very long time to keep the standards of licensing of drivers to a bare minimum. This is simply not the case in places like Germany. Lower qualifications to licensing means that you have to assume more of the drivers on the road are not really capable.
2. Roads are often build to the minimum requirements. If you don't keep an eye on the contractors, they will often overstate how much building materials they actually used in order to get free money. These are old tricks on the trade. My father, as an engineering geologist, encountered unscrupulous contractors often on public works projects that he was involved with.
3. If they would build the roads to last, that would mean less annual income for the contractors. We still haven't been able to fix this problem in many parts of the country.

The vast majority of accidents are low-speed accidents with limited or no injuries in... parking lots.

Now, can somebody please explain to me what any of this has to do with the TSA?

Life would be so much easier if we could just look at the source code. -- Dave Olson

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