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Comment: America needs to change as well (Score 0) 218

by WindBourne (#49761703) Attached to: Amazon Decides To Start Paying Tax In the UK
It is time to tax sales all over the states, based on where it goes to.
The easiest way is to have any out-of-state (or out-of-nation) delivery to add 10% to the sale. This is above and beyond the delivery.
Then the delivery entity gets to keep 10% of that (or 1% of the total sales) for handling this.
Then the 9% is delivered to the state, along with the address of where item was delivered to. From there, the state breaks it apart into state, county, locality.

If every state will agree with this, it is actually EASIER AND CHEAPER to the business than trying to calculate the taxes based on the address.

And it is LONG past time for America to tax delivered items.

Comment: Death is immanent, if not imminent (Score 5, Interesting) 90

by argStyopa (#49759459) Attached to: Death In the Browser Tab

On the other hand, in pre-modern eras (as well, sadly, for much of the 3rd-4th-world today) death was everywhere.
Most people lived/worked on farms, where animals were killed more or less in front of you, for you to eat that night, or later. Every family lost children, with medieval death rates for 2 yr olds reaching 50%, mostly to drowning. The slightest injury could easily (and more or less quickly) be lethal through infection, while waves of typhus and other communicable diseases were almost a constant fear.

I think what the author meant to say is that our little niche of modernity when we were safe from most random environmental deaths, yet insulated and never actually confronted by death, may have ended.

Comment: Yes, and? (Score 1) 359

Of COURSE they're studying the consequences of a potential Brexit; believe me, the fact that there will likely be a referendum on it means the chance is greater than zero and thus EVERY responsible financial entity is doing the same.
And chattering that they are who they are, it would be almost criminally negligent if they weren't studying it closely.

In the same sense the U.S. army had http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki..., because unless they're busy with an active war (and even then), their job as a government agency is very specifically to consider and plan for any conceivable future.

Of course the troubling bit is the incompetence of mailing this to the news agencies, unless that was deliberate, which itself doesn't seem that unreasonable/incomprehensible, now that I think of it (except if it actually costs the minister a job he'd have preferred to keep).

Comment: Re:WSJ is owned by NewsCorp now, right? (Score 0) 225

by WindBourne (#49756773) Attached to: WSJ Crowdsources Investigation of Hillary Clinton Emails

Read this link..

You MIGHT learn something.

Although your addle-brained Fox Derangement Syndrome doesn't correlate well with intelligence.

How funny. You did not learn. He was actually accurate in saying that. But you accuse him of a personal attack, when in fact, it was not. It might be an attack by association, but that is something totally different. However, the fact is, that WSJ is owned by murdock and has turned from conservative to loony tunes since that time.

Comment: Re:LOL; What a fucking bozo you are (Score 1) 263

Oops on 1. It was roughly 1980 when America started to emit more CO2 than Europe. Prior to that, Europe emitted more.

I stand by #2, based on the above. You can see that starting in 2008, America's emissions started dropping, and has continued since that time. More importantly, it will continue for the next 4 years, if not longer. And here is EIA saying that much more will close. And IER thinks that 72 GW of 321 GW of coal plants are going to shut down before 2020. Note that Coal plants account for about 3/4 of electricities CO2 emissions in America. Shutting down that 72 GW, which are the worst, will take out roughly 1/4 of that CO2 of Electricities CO2 emissions.

This data from Europe, shows that America's data starts in 1992 at 5.0. hits highest point was 2007 (5.9 billion tonnes) drops to 5.3 in 2013. Likewise, Eu28 data start in 1992 at 4.3 and then sits at it until 2007, where it also drops to 3.7.
Sadly, this article does not do justice to the amount of emissions that Europe kicks out, but the map in it shows how much is really coming out of Europe AND CHINA.

And as to 4 above, that stands on its own. Again, OCO2 shows how much China emits, which is far far more than is generally admitted since Chinese leaders are lying.

and you can look up 5 and 6, or even think about it. China's emissions from 1850 on, exceed America's total. And considering that China and Europe have been burning coal for multiple millennium as well as have been the most populated areas of the world for the last milenium, it makes sense that they account for the majority.

Comment: LOL; What a fucking bozo you are (Score 1) 263

People like you LOVE to point fingers at America as being the main one here causing this.
1) back in 1992 when we found out about this, Europe's yearly total emissions were actually MORE than America's and had been for a LONG TIME. Europe's gas tax is what brought down Europe's emissions, not the poltics.
2) During the time of W, America did NOT cut back, however, for the last 6 years, we have cut back because of 3 reasons:
a) cheap nat gas here, combined with cheap wind. Both of these are much cheaper to do than coal.
b) W delayed regulations on mercury until 2017. Now it is taking effect and many coal plants have shut down, with more to come.
c) O's regulations are taking hold and is preventing future coal plants, as well as some nat gas plants, and leading towards more AE, along with nukes.
3) America's emission are today BELOW 15%, and dropping. China's emission are estimated at around 33% of global emissions, rising, and that is without data from OCO2.
4) OCO2's emissions PROVE that China's emissions are much higher than anybody elses.
5) Not only is China's yearly emissions double of America's, but as of THIS YEAR, their TOTALED emission from 1850, is greater than America's.
6) And in terms of total emission for the last millennium, China's is greaters than Europes, but both are MUCH MUCH greater's than all of the America's COMBINED.

Yet, idiots like you will focus on 1 nation, rather than focusing on the nation that accounts for more than 40% (OCO2's date is going to prove that China has lied about their real emissions), or the fact that Europe's total emissions is much much higher than America.

Comment: Not so sure (Score 1) 227

by argStyopa (#49752613) Attached to: Asteroid Risk Greatly Overestimated By Almost Everyone

It's very trendy to say "When it comes to risk assessment, there's one type that humans are notoriously bad at: the very low-frequency but high-consequence risks and rewards" but I'm not so sure that's true?

These kind of talks seemingly always look at risk/reward calculations as symmetric, which they very abundantly aren't.

The fact is that people are extraordinarily conservative when it comes to the rare-risk, high-cost cases, but rather daring when it comes to rare-but-high-reward cases because, well, we're alive and we'd rather stay that way. A 0.000001% chance that you and everyone dies *should* be regarded far more seriously than a similar chance you win a big pile of cash because one of those situations you survive either way.

Nota Bene: I don't play the lottery; well, I did play it ONCE, recognizing that my odds of winning were the highest possible with that one play, and only decrease from there.

Comment: Re:When will their price be on par with ICE cars? (Score 1) 107

Even in California where we're paying $0.15 - $0.20 per kWh of electricity, electric vehicles save so much gas that they almost pay for themselves.

Only because you're getting ass-raped on gasoline as well. When I topped off the gas tank here in Vegas before driving down to LA last weekend to visit my nieces, I paid $3.04. I pulled over in Baker for a snack. The gas station next to the jerky place wanted somewhere around $4.50! Granted, Baker's never been the cheapest, but gas in Barstow was still around $3.70. I think it was $4.something around LA, and by the time I was running on fumes Sunday morning (driving down to San Diego to make everything worse), I ended up paying right at $4 per gallon ($3.999, if you want to be pedantic) for a full tank in Carlsbad.

Gasoline is sent to Las Vegas from California by pipeline, so how is it we're paying considerably less for the same fuel after it's been pumped through ~300 miles of pipe?

Comment: Re:Android. The "PC" of mobile devices (Score 1) 91

You are generally safe with Nexus devices, since you have the best chance of upgrading to the latest OS.

A device with an unlocked bootloader is also more likely to be more future-proof. I have a newer version of KitKat running on my Galaxy Tab 2 7.0 (4.4.4) than on my considerably newer Moto X (4.4). The tablet's running Cyanogenmod...have no idea if Samsung ever got around to spinning a KitKat build for it, and don't particularly care at this point as the only thing that doesn't work under Cyanogenmod is the IR blaster. My phone, OTOH? Motorola has pushed newer versions (maybe even Lollipop now), but the bootloader is locked and you can't even root newer firmware versions (rooting 4.4.4 requires an unlocked bootloader first).

That new phone that Asus introduced earlier this week sounds interesting, and there's already an unlock for it. The only downside is the ginormous, almost tablet-sized screen. The Moto X is barely larger than the iPhone 4 it replaced, but it seems hardly anybody wants to build a full-powered phone that'll still fit in your pocket anymore.

Any sufficiently advanced technology is indistinguishable from a rigged demo.

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