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The Internet

+ - Comcast, net neutrality advocates clash->

Submitted by
milsoRgen
milsoRgen writes "A civil but tense tone prevailed at today's Federal Communications Commission's hearing on how to address concerns that Comcast and other ISPs degrade P2P traffic. Comcast executive vice president David L. Cohen was the star of the show, and he knew it. "It's a pleasure to be here as a participant and hopefully not the main course for your meal," Cohen told all five Commissioners and a lively audience during the event's first panel discussion, held at Harvard Law School in Cambridge, Massachusetts."
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United States

Lessig Decides Not to Run For Congress 80

Posted by ScuttleMonkey
from the jedis-are-going-to-feel-this-one dept.
micheas writes "Larry Lessig has decided that running for U.S. Congress himself in a special election would be too risky to his Change Congress movement and has decided not to run. 'With lots of mixed feelings, I have decided a run for Congress would not help the Change Congress movement. I explain the thinking in this 5 minute video (a new record for me!). First question: What happens to the contributions to Lessig08? As explained on the ActBlue page, all will go to (the yet to be established) Change Congress organization.'"
PC Games (Games)

+ - Game Scoring Site Wields Industry Clout->

Submitted by
milsoRgen
milsoRgen writes "John Riccitiello, head of Electronic Arts, is showing a chart to Wall Street analysts and he is not happy. This chart, Riccitiello grouses, shows the one metric that has most frustrated him since he took over the world's largest video game publisher nearly a year ago. It doesn't show the company's falling operating profit or sliding market share. Instead, it shows the average score for EA's video games on Metacritic.org, a Web site that distills a pool of reviews for a given game down to a single number."
Link to Original Source
Security

+ - Researchers crack FileVault, BitLocker with canned->

Submitted by
milsoRgen
milsoRgen writes "One of the adages of computing is that no hardware is safe when someone has physical access to the machine. In an age of booming laptop sales, people haven't found that reassuring and have frequently turned to disk encryption in an effort to protect their personal data. A new paper (PDF) by a group of Princeton computer scientists suggests that disk encryption is vulnerable to a hack that will be hard to correct for: data about the encryption can be extracted from the machine's RAM."
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Windows

+ - Microsoft Pledges To Open Up Some Software->

Submitted by
milsoRgen
milsoRgen writes "Hoping to appease antitrust regulators in the European Union, Microsoft (NASDAQ:MSFT) on Thursday said it would work to make its software products more interoperable with those of its competitors. Microsoft MSFT executives promised to support standards and work more closely with the industry, including proponents of free, "open-source" software."
Link to Original Source
Microsoft

+ - Microsoft to Open Source Code-> 1

Submitted by bagsc
bagsc (254194) writes "This could be the big one! Details are scarce so far, but tomorrow's Wall Street Journal page one says: "Microsoft Corp., aiming to battle Internet rivals, announced a sweeping set of moves to loosen control of its tightly protected programs and encourage software makers to build add-on products." Vista, Word, Excel have been named as to be opened. It looks like this may be a concession to regulators to get the Yahoo! deal done."
Link to Original Source
Robotics

WizKid Robot Debuts At New York Museum 58

Posted by ScuttleMonkey
from the will-he-know-when-to-leave-you-alone dept.
ScienceDaily is reporting that a new exhibit at the Museum of Modern Art in New York is part computer, part robot, and part child. Part of the "Design and the Elastic Mind" exhibit "WizKid" is able to focus on human faces and follows your movement allowing you to interact with objects on its display simply by waving your arms. "Wizkid looks like a computer with a neck. But there the similarities with the familiar personal computer end. Wizkid isn't static. The screen on the mobile neck moves about like a head, and it's trained to hone in on human faces. Once it sees you, Wizkid focuses on you and follows your movement. Unlike a computer, which requires you to stop what you're doing and adapt your behavior and social interactions in order to use it, Wizkid blends into human space. There's no mouse and no keyboard. You don't touch anything. There's no language getting in the way. On Wizkid's screen you see yourself surrounded by a "halo" of interactive elements that you can simply select by waving your hands. If you move away or to one side, Wizkid adapts itself to you, not the other way around. If you're with a friend, Wizkid finds and tracks both of you and tries to figure out your relationship, expressing surprise, confusion or enjoyment when it gets your response."
The Media

CNN Fires Producer Over Personal Blog 461

Posted by ScuttleMonkey
from the team-players-who-realize-their-team-sucks dept.
dangerz writes "CNN has fired one of its producers because of his personal blog. Chez Paziena, the ex-producer, has stated that he started the blog 'mostly to pass the time, hone my writing skills, resurrect my voice a little, and keep my mind sharp following the [brain tumor] surgery.' After a few months, CNN found out about it and ended up letting him go because his 'name was "attached to some, uh, 'opinionated' blog posts" circulating around the internet.'"
Book Reviews

Hacking: The Art of Exploitation 59

Posted by samzenpus
from the protect-ya-neck dept.
David Martinjak writes "Hacking: The Art of Exploitation is authored by Jon Erickson and published by No Starch Press. It is the anticipated second edition of Erickson's earlier publication of the same title. I can't think of a way to summarize it without being over-dramatic, so it will just be said: I really liked it. The book, which will be referred to as simply Hacking, starts by introducing the author's description of hacking. Erickson takes a great approach by admitting that the common perception of hacking is rather negative, and unfortunately accurate in some cases. However, he smoothly counters this antagonistic misunderstanding by presenting a simple arithmetic problem. A bit of creativity is needed to arrive at the correct solution, but creativity and problem-solving are two integral aspects of hacking, at least to Erickson. The introduction chapter sets an acceptable tone and proper frame of mind for proceeding with the technical material." Below you'll find the rest of David's review.
Security

+ - Cult of the Dead Cow returns with Google hacking ->

Submitted by
juct
juct writes "Google hacking is not really new — and neither were backdoors ten years ago, when cDc released Back Orifice. But like the latter Goolag Scan rubs salt into an open wound: "Private individuals, firms, and even governments are putting more and more stuff on the web, and nobody cares what it means for security", explained cDc member Oxblood Ruffin to heise Security. The tool makes it a matter of mouse clicks to find sensitive information, hidden backdoors or vulnerable servers. Its use might be illegal in some countries though."
Link to Original Source
Businesses

+ - SPAM: The web vs. U.S. Bank

Submitted by
destinyland
destinyland writes "Online information is creating problems for U.S. Bancorp. A new federal law lets customers opt-out of high-fee overdraft protection. In October a consumer site published an internal U.S. Bancorp memo, which inspired a Washington customer to confront a local manager who insisted that opting out was impossible. He ultimately received an apology from the bank's CEO — but two days later recorded the bank's tellers again wrongly advising customers that opting out was impossible. Now he's posted the audio recording online, targetting the $50 billion a year banks earn from their "courtesy" overdraft protection."
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Government

+ - Utah the First Official Police State?

Submitted by greenbird
greenbird (859670) writes "I'm shocked both sides of political spectrum aren't freaking over this. Modern technology has made it much easier for both the press and public to expose misconduct by public officials. You would think this would be encouraged by any benevolent government as it makes the world a better place for everyone except wrong the doers. Not so in Utah. After a video obtained through a freedom of information act request appeared on YouTube of a Utah State Trooper tasering someone, State Senator Chris Buttars has introduced a bill that would allow the authorities to keep the public from viewing any information relating to police misconduct. Forget about warrantless spying. This isn't a step towards a police state. This is the police state should this bill be passed and the law upheld. It essentially removes any public oversight of police actions. That any politician could introduce such a law and not suffer fatal backlash is terrifying to me. I would think the press would be screaming about this as it would represent a severe restriction on their ability to investigate and report on police misconduct. They're suppose to be the first line of defense against government overstepping it's bounds."

Thus spake the master programmer: "When a program is being tested, it is too late to make design changes." -- Geoffrey James, "The Tao of Programming"

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