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Comment: Comparing high end to low end (Score 3, Interesting) 322

by milgr (#36775488) Attached to: The History of Ethernet

In the 1980s, ethernet tended to be over Thinnet or Thicknet. I seem to recall speeds of 1-3Mbps over those technologies. Twisted pair came out somewhere around 1990 at 10Mbps.

Today I mostly use 1Gps, but deal with servers that are 10G.40G and 100G will be standard in datacenters in a few years.

The blurb indicates that Ethernet is the only technology that we are using from 30 years ago. Back then all the machines I used had Memory, cpus, displays, and keyboards. The particualr technology changed - just like Ethernet technology's changes.

Comment: Re:PRIMOS! (Score 1) 763

by milgr (#34576444) Attached to: OS I'd Most Like To See Make a Comeback

My first real job was at Prime. There were some interesting features in the kernel - such as how dynamic libraries worked, but quite a bit was inefficient.

My biggest peeve with Primos was how the filesystem was laid out. Each block was 540 bytes (an odd sector size), with pointers to the next and previous block in the file. This made filesystem corruption fairly easy to recover from, but file deletion was slow for large files - as every block in the file would need to be read and written back to disk.

The 50 series platform demonstrates that many people make faulty assumptions about the size of data types. For example is sizeof(char *) always equal to sizeof(int *)?

Crime

Things You Drink Can Be Used To Track You 202

Posted by timothy
from the don't-hate-me-because-I'm-a-beautiful-spy dept.
sciencehabit writes with an intriguing story about the potential of figuring out where people have been by examining their hair: "That's because water molecules differ slightly in their isotope ratios depending on the minerals at their source. Researchers found that water samples from 33 cities across the United State could be reliably traced back to their origin based on their isotope ratios. And because the human body breaks down water's constituent atoms of hydrogen and oxygen to construct the proteins that make hair cells, those cells can preserve the record of a person's travels. Such information could help prosecutors place a suspect at the scene of a crime, or prove the innocence of the accused." Or frame someone by slipping them water from every country on the terrorist watchlist.

Comment: Re:Solution... (Score 1) 362

by milgr (#32335314) Attached to: Tabnapping Scams Around the Corner?
The tabs are related... they are all web pages. I have about 25 tabs open in each of 2 Firefox windows. I also have numerous other windows on each of 7 virtual screens on each of 2 physical screens. Before the days of tabs, it was challenging to find the correct window. Now, for a web page I merely look in my browser tab list.

Hmm... maybe I should create a new SELinux sandbox for Firefox for each web page I visit, and avoid tabs.

Comment: Too wordy (Score 4, Informative) 163

by milgr (#31236564) Attached to: Learning Python, 4th Edition

I bought this book about a month ago. I had my doubts about a book this size, and my doubts were realized.

I learned C from K&R first edition. K&R is about 150 pages (from memory). It covers all of the language succinctly and completely. Actually, it covers most of the language twice - first in tutorial form then in specification form. It is a fine resource.

Why should a book on Python be over 1000 pages? I started reading this book the same way I read K&R - from the beginning. Unlike K&R, after 50 pages I barely got to coding. Within each section the language is quite verbose. I suspect that the authors were paid by the word or the page.

On a positive note, I was able to use this book as a reference book as the index is quite reasonable.

I would recommend this book to those insomniacs who are interested in learning Python.

Red Hat Software

Fedora 12 Released 236

Posted by timothy
from the new-hat-for-the-holidays dept.
AdamWill writes "The Fedora Project is pleased to announce the release of Fedora 12 today. With all the latest open source software and major improvements to graphics support, networking, virtualization and more, Fedora 12 is one of the most exciting releases so far. You can download it here. There's a one-page guide to the new release for those in a hurry. The full release announcement has details on the major features, and the release notes contain comprehensive information on changes in this new release. Known issues are documented on the common bugs page."
Red Hat Software

Fedora 12 Beta Released 236

Posted by timothy
from the crimson-chapeau dept.
AdamWill writes "The Fedora project has announced the release of Fedora 12 Beta, which is available here. This will be the final pre-release before the final release in November. New features of Fedora 12 highlighted in the announcement include substantial improvements and fixes to the major graphics drivers, including experimental 3D acceleration support for AMD Radeon r600+-based adapters; improved mobile broadband support and new Bluetooth PAN tethering support in NetworkManager; improved performance in the 32-bit releases; significant fixes and improvements to audio support, including easy Bluetooth audio support; initial implementation of completely open source Broadcom wireless networking via the openfwwf project; significant improvements to the Fedora virtualization stack; and easy access to the Moblin desktop environment and a preview of the new GNOME Shell interface for GNOME. Further details on the major new features of Fedora 12 can be found in the release announcement and feature list. Known issues are documented in the common bugs page."
The Internet

Entire .SE TLD Drops Off the Internet 207

Posted by timothy
from the absolut-typo dept.
Icemaann writes "Pingdom and Network World are reporting that the SE tld dropped off the internet yesterday due to a bug in the script that generates the SE zone file. The SE tld has close to one million domains that all went down due to missing the trailing dot in the SE zone file. Some caching nameservers may still be returning invalid DNS responses for 24 hours."

Comment: Some examples would be useful (Score 2, Informative) 1255

by milgr (#29720711) Attached to: FOSS Sexism Claims Met With Ire and Denial
I search the post an linked articles for concrete examples of sexism. I found some - about 4 indirections away from slashdot. http://www.faqs.org/docs/Linux-HOWTO/Encourage-Women-Linux-HOWTO.html links to some eight year old posts that are sexist.

All of the high-tech companies that I've worked for have many more men than women. Most of the applications for positions are from men.

In over 20 years in the industry, I only remember observing one sexist incident.

Comment: Re:How remote (Score 1) 206

by milgr (#29720361) Attached to: About X% Of My Daily Co-workers Are Remote.
Where I work, we define remote as working from home. It is sometimes hard to keep track of who is remote - working from home - vs. working at a different company office.

We conduct many of our meetings via IRC - and have second meeting 12 hours after the first so it shouldn't be too painful for everyone to make at least one of the meetings. I am constantly surprised as to which meeting certain people show up for.

Nobody said computers were going to be polite.

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