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Comment: Re:Bittorrent != Piracy (Score 1) 223

by gtbritishskull (#31910122) Attached to: BitTorrent CEO On Net Neutrality

Last time I checked, it was not illegal to download p0rn. Why are you lumping it in with illegal activities?

And yes, there are illegal ways of downloading p0rn (copyrighted or underage). But, regardless of the ethical considerations, there is no law against downloading a video of consenting adults engaged in sexual activities. (At least, no federal law that I know of. I am sure some of the more conservative states have laws against it)

Comment: Re:Is it me or is he sounding more desperate? (Score 1) 733

by DavidTC (#31909988) Attached to: Roger Ebert On Why Video Games Can Never Be Art

So for those people who *are able* to grasp the second meaning, it is art, and for those who can't, it is not ? You just justified Ebert's opinion (for him, it ain't art) and nullified your position (art has an objective definition). We're back again to whatever a person calls art, is art.

No, I didn't say it wasn't art. I wasn't trying to imply that the 'art test' decided what was art. Anything that's created with the intent of multiple meanings, or 'found' and displayed with that intent is art.

Just like any collection of sounds that people make to try to convey a meaning is speech, and any collection of plant and animals prepared with the intent that people eat them is food.

Anything people can't generally figure out the secondary meaning, however, is not worth treating as art. It is speech in a secret language only you can understand, it is food that is it not possible to ingest.

Art without any communication is art that is an utter failure. It is 'art', in the same way that someone speaking nonsense is creating 'speech', or someone who made a 'tree bark salad' is creating 'food', and that should be about the level of attention we pay those artists.

Don't confuse that with bad art, which is art that does not get its intended meaning across well. Even with incredibly bad art, you can figure out what the creator was trying to say, even if they have failed. I.e., it's someone who mumbles and you miss a few words, or it's someone who burned the food...you can figure it out what was supposed to be going on, but they were not up to the task.

Comment: Re:the ipad isn't a computer (Score 1) 514

by assertation (#31909950) Attached to: History Repeats Itself — Mac & the iPad

I disagree here is that paragraph


If I have a beef with the iPad, it's that while it's a lovely device for consuming content, it doesn't do much to facilitate its creation. The computer is the greatest all-purpose creativity tool since the pen. It put a music studio, a movie studio, a darkroom and a publishing house on everybody's desk. The iPad shifts the emphasis from creating content to merely absorbing and manipulating it. It mutes you, turns you back into a passive consumer of other people's masterpieces. In that sense, it's a step backward. Not much of a fairy-tale ending. Except for the people who are selling content.

Read more: http://www.time.com/time/business/article/0,8599,1976932-2,00.html#ixzz0lePJ0cD3

I don't own any Apple products. I am not a fanboy. I use Ubuntu.

The author gets it wrong. The iPad is not a home computer replacement. It is a consumption device so that you can consume other people's content comfortably away from home ( or at home on a couch ). If you want to do the things you do on a computer, you go to your computer and I am sure Apple is hoping people will buy both.

If I ever buy anything like iPad that is how I will do it. If I have one it will be for reading the web on a plane ride, not a place where I will likely be doing photoshop or composing music.

Comment: Natural-Language Legal Expert System Builder (Score 1) 278

by Baldrson (#31909762) Attached to: SEC Proposes Wall Street Transparency Via Python
Example of Normalized English Input to NLESB

Normalized English has been developed by Layman E. Allen and his colleagues; see for example, Layman E. Allen, ``Language, Law and Logic: Plain Legal Drafting for the Electronic Age,'' Computer Science and Law (Bryan Niblett ed.), 1980, pp. 75-100. Normalized language has been used in the Tennessee statutes (Tenn. Code Ann. sect. 33-6-104(a) (1991)).
An example of the form of Normalized English used as input to the NLESB system follows. Note that the formatting is for the sake of readability, and is not necessary for NLESB.

Subsection (a).    IF AND ONLY IF
(1)(A)    A person has threatened or attempted suicide or to inflict serious
    bodily harm on himself, OR
    (B)    The person has threatened or attempted homicide or other violent
    behavior, OR
    (C)    The person has placed others in reasonable fear of violent behavior
    and serious physical harm to them, OR
    (D)    The person is unable to avoid severe impairment or injury from
    specific risks, AND
(2)    There is a substantial likelihood that such harm will occur,
THEN
(3)    The person poses a "substantial likelihood of serious harm" for
    purposes of subsection (b).

Subsection (b). IF AND ONLY IF
(1)    A person is mentally ill, AND
(2)    The person poses a substantial likelihood of serious harm because of
    the mental illness, AND
(3)    The person needs care, training, or treatment because of the mental
    illness, AND
(4)    All available less drastic alternatives to placement in a hospital or
    treatment resource are unsuitable to meet the needs of the person,
THEN
(5)    The person may be judicially committed to involuntary care and
    treatment in a hospital or treatment resource.

http://www.cs.utk.edu/~mclennan/NLESB-normal.html

Natural-Language Legal Expert System Builder (NLESB)

NLESB enables a lawyer to build a useful legal expert system in ordinary English without being a computer expert. It accepts rules in ordinary English, though in normalized form, and parses them into propositional data structures that it can use to draw inferences. NLESB has some features, particularly in its logic, that are peculiar to the needs of legal expert systems.
Send me mail for reprints or if you are interested in using our prototype implementation.

Publications (reverse chronological order):

A Logic for Statutory Law, by John Nolt, Grayfred B. Gray, Bruce J. MacLennan, and Donald J. Ploch, Jurimetics 35, 2 (Winter 1995), pp. 121–151. Winner of Loevinger Prize.

Legal Expert System Building: A Semi-Intelligent Computer Program Makes It Easier, by Grayfred B. Gray, Bruce J. MacLennan, John E. Nolt & Donald R. Ploch, John Marshall Journal of Computer and Information Law, 12 (1994), pp. 555–583.

Readability of the Law: Forms of Law for Building Legal Expert Systems, by Donald R. Ploch, Bethany K. Dumas, Grayfred B. Grey, Bruce J. MacLennan, and John E. Nolt, Jurimetrics 33, 2 (Winter 1993), pp. 189–221.

Law Reading Experiment, by Donald R. Ploch, Bethany K. Dumas, Grayfred H. Gray, Bruce MacLennan, & John Nolt, Pre-Proceedings of the III International Conference, Logica Informatica Diritto: Legal Expert Systems, A. A. Martino (ed.), Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Istituto per la documentazione giuridica, Florence, Italy, November 2-5, 1989, Vol. 2, pp. 681–704.

Comment: Re:More British terminology (Score 1) 238

by overlordofmu (#31909754) Attached to: An Early Look At Next-Gen Shooter <em>Bodycount</em>
In college, my freshman year roommate was Indian. India has a wonderful educational system left over from British colonial rule (if you are rich enough to send your children).

Q:How does this fit in?
A: My roommate spoken English English and not the shit that Americans call English.

This leads us to the first day of class and I am coming back to the dorm and smoking a cigarette which is something my roommate had yet to see me do. As I walk up to Dushie (his nickname) and his friends he loudly calls out to me over the 20 or so meters I have yet to cover, "What are you doing with that fag hanging out of your mouth?" I stopped and looked around to see what he was referring to because, after all, this was college . . .

+ - Humans 1, Skynet 0: USAF Shoots Down Out-of-Contro-> 1

Submitted by
mikeasu
mikeasu writes "The United States Air Force (USAF) shot down an unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) on Sunday morning after it lost control of the aircraft over a remote area in Northern Afghanistan. Military "philosophical" question: Does this count as a blue on blue engagement? Or does the UAV become "red" after control is lost?"
Link to Original Source

Comment: Atari 400: (Score 1) 806

by mikeasu (#28336293) Attached to: Fifteen Classic PC Design Mistakes
Anyone remember the Atari 400? The budget version of the Atari 800. Had some sort of acrylic keyboard with pads that you really had to apply some pressure to for the press to register. Also had a lovely feature in the cartridge slot cover - spring loaded, and took several tries to make it latch. If the latch isn't engaged, the system wouldn't function.

Comment: Re:Ultima I on the C64 (Score 2, Interesting) 282

by mikeasu (#27475961) Attached to: Strange Glitches In Games
Yeah, I remember that one in U4. Worked so much better than repeatedly raiding LB's castle treasury (10 chests through a secret door in the wall, ground level) - sure, I was rich, but what a hit on the honesty virtue! Another good one in U4 for later in the game was selling the mystic arms, then searching the ground for them again - you got another set if (I think) you didn't already have eight.

Wherever you go...There you are. - Buckaroo Banzai

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