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XBox (Games)

Xbox Live Enforcement — No Swastika Logo 473

itwbennett writes "It's one of those questions that really should never come up, but as blogger Peter Smith points out, Stephen Toulouse, the head of Xbox Live enforcement, is used to fielding all sorts of strange questions. Recently, one of those questions was apparently 'Can I use a Swastika as my logo in Call of Duty: Black Ops?' When Toulouse responded with the obvious answer ('No, of course you can't, we'll ban you.') he was met with some pushback by people he refers to as 'contrarians' and 'internet pundits' who decided to educate him on the long and storied history of the swastika as a symbol of good fortune and how just because the Nazis used it, it doesn't make the symbol itself a bad thing. Toulouse covers the topic on his blog in a post titled Context and it's an interesting read if for no other reason than to get a peek inside the day-to-day issues the Xbox Live Enforcement team deals with."

Comment Re:and the best F1 track is (Score 1) 90

Yeah, ok maybe, but the Nordschleife is NOT an "F1 Track" - not any more. I was thinking of "tracks you can go to to see a race".

After all, tracks they used to run on includes all kinds of weird and wonderful places. If they still did Watkins Glen I'd probably go see that too.


Submission + - "Telecommuting" in Formula 1 (

flewp writes: So it may not be as technical a story as most /. readers might like, but it gives a nice little insight into the basics of the workings of one of the most high tech sports (consider that a few years ago, Sauber's supercomputer ranked towards the top of all the supercomputers in Europe) on the planet. While the teams bring dozens of mechanics, support personnel, etc, to each race, back at their home bases there's countless more engineers working (with the help of gobs of computing power) to give each team that added extra edge.

Comment Re:The Thrill Wears Off When the Math Kicks In (Score 2, Informative) 207

I get dead-tree Wired for $10 a year; less than a buck an issue. So for the price of more than 5 such issues, I should buy a single issue with a glorified shovel-ware interface?

Hmmm, let me think about that for a second. OK, no.

Yes, I agree with this. I get it cheap, too. I've been collecting it for years.

Bad enough Wired never grew up out of its hipster typeface fetish, rendering many of the paper pages barely legible; I shudder to imagine what it looks like on an iPad.

Completely not true. They gave up the illegible chaotic design many years ago. The main article text is all the same typeface black on white, laid out as normal (parallel to the bottom of the page). The diagonally set text on paisley backgrounds, or whatever, was fun for a bit, but stopped a long LONG time ago.


Submission + - Hackers target tsunami search results (

xsee writes: Only hours after the earthquake and resulting tsunami from Chile, hackers appear to be manipulating search results to direct people seeking information on this event to infected webpages. Exercise caution as to where you get information on this tragedy.

Submission + - Firefox on Linux cut off from Google? 3

ms602 writes: On the evening of February 26th, I restarted Firefox to find myself logged out of Google, as I typically leave Gmail, Reader, and Voice open at all times. When I attempted to login, I received an error page that my browser was no longer supported. I relaunched Firefox, and the error message did not return, Google simply failed to login. I thought that strange, since I run Firefox 3.6 on Ubuntu 9.10 with all updates installed. So I checked that my updates were good, and even tried downgrading to Firefox 3.5, and no dice. Google Chrome works, of course, but is anyone else having this Firefox/Linux/Google issue? It doesn't seem to be a technical issue, did Google change some policy recently? It wouldn't be surprising given recent hacking attempts towards Gmail in China...

A right is not what someone gives you; it's what no one can take from you. -- Ramsey Clark