Forgot your password?
typodupeerror

Comment: Re:Tablet computing (Score 1) 564

by michaelwigle (#45921183) Attached to: PC Shipments In 2013 See the Worst Yearly Decline In History
I feel the same way as far as not liking to do any "real" work on a tablet such as word processing, long e-mails, etc. However, I've been noticing more of my co-workers and other folks lately on their PCs and realizing that they are as slow on a regular keyboard as they are on a tablet when it comes to typing. So, this may actually be a non-issue for a larger portion of the population than I originally thought. Kids are coming out of school with good mouse skills but still having lousy typing skills (at least around here that I have noticed)

Comment: Re:What happens when this fails? (Score 1) 393

by michaelwigle (#44402037) Attached to: Every Public School Student In LA Will Get an iPad In 2014
It's still done that way in my neighborhood. But the schools found a solution. They stopped using textbooks. You think I kid. Sadly, it's true. The administration just tells the teachers to find worksheets online and print them off. The kids just ignore the "Do not make copies" at the bottom of the pages of their handouts. :P

+ - New CFAA Could Incarcerate Teenagers For Reading Online News->

Submitted by redletterdave
redletterdave (2493036) writes "Anyone under 18 found reading the news online could hypothetically face jail time according to the latest draft of the Computer Fraud and Abuse Act (CFAA), which is said to be “rushed” to Congress during its “cyber week” in the middle of April. According to the new proposal floated by the House Judiciary Committee, the CFAA would be amended to treat any violation of a website’s Terms of Service – or an employer’s Terms of Use policy – as a criminal act. Applied to the world of online publications, this could be a dangerous notion: For example, many news websites’ Terms of Use warn against any users under a certain age to use their site. In fact, NPR and the Hearst Corporation’s entire family of publications, which includes Popular Mechanics, the San Francisco Chronicle and the Houston Chronicle, all disallow readers under 18 from using their "services." According to the DOJ, this would mean anyone under 18 found accessing these sites — even just to read or comment on a story — could face criminal charges."
Link to Original Source

Comment: Re:Defending in Depth? Or Eggs in All Baskets? (Score 1) 132

by michaelwigle (#40907775) Attached to: Wired Writer Hack Shows Need For Tighter Cloud Security

I use LP too, though I have to confess that I don't make full use of their password generation feature. I haven't tried the mobile apps - do those make it easy to log into sites from your phone?

Yes..

What about when you're at a different computer (not your own) - you simply use the mobile app to retrieve your password?

... and yes (if by mobile app you mean log on to the web site). You could, of course, also have a mobile version of Firefox with Lastpass so there is no danger of keylogging your Lastpass sign-in.

Comment: Re:It might be even more sinister than that (Score 1) 263

by michaelwigle (#40564343) Attached to: Feds Plan 'Fog of Disinformation' To Track Information Leaks
Actually, FTA...

researchers say they’ve built “a prototype for automatically generating and distributing believable misinformation

That sounds like an automated version of dreaming up gloom doom death scenarios, but it's not to say it was a joke. For one, the person who leaked it would be identified. For two, if someone leaks real information there is nothing stopping the government from claiming it was "believable misinformation".

The person who's taking you to lunch has no intention of paying.

Working...