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Man Sues Neighbor For Not Turning Off His Wi-Fi 428

Posted by samzenpus
from the have-you-never-wondered-why-I-drink-only-distilled-water-or-rain-water-and-only-pure-grain-alcohol dept.
Scyth3 writes "A man is suing his neighbor for not turning off his cell phone or wireless router. He claims it affects his 'electromagnetic allergies,' and has resorted to being homeless. So, why doesn't he check into a hotel? Because hotels typically have wireless internet for free. I wonder if a tinfoil hat would help his cause?"
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Best Man Rigs Newlyweds' Bed To Tweet During Sex 272

Posted by samzenpus
from the nice-feed dept.
When an UK man was asked to be the best man at a friend's wedding he agreed that he would not pull any pranks before or during the ceremony. Now the groom wishes he had extended the agreement to after the blessed occasion as well. The best man snuck into the newlyweds' house while they were away on their honeymoon and placed a pressure-sensitive device under their mattress. The device now automatically tweets when the couple have sex. The updates include the length of activity and how vigorous the act was on a scale of 1-10.

Comment: Re:100 miles to the nearest commuter train, (Score 1) 1137

by mi11house (#27876017) Attached to: Your Commuting Costs By Car Vs. Train?

I've been commuting on a singlespeed road bike (Specialized Langster) here in London virtually every day for the last 9 months.

Ongoing costs so far have been a set of brake pads and some chain lube. The singlespeed drivetrain is almost bulletproof - just wipe and re-lube every so often.

The bike "paid for itself" (i.e. offset what I would have paid on the Tube) in less than 6 months, and I've lost 10kg of blubber at the same time. Now I'm "in profit" in both financial and health terms. I've never felt better, and arrive at work feeling sharp and don't need (as much) coffee.

I understand that bicycling isn't/can't be for everyone, especially not on a singlespeed (my London commute is astonishingly flat - Keira Knightley-esque!) but it's made a huge difference to my life. I wish more people would try it!

Comment: Re:It's the carriers, not the technology (Score 1) 113

by mi11house (#27516175) Attached to: Can Mobile Broadband Solve the UK Digital Divide?

I've used GPRS and 3G mobile broadband in both Australia and the UK. The problems they have to solve are very different, which is why you get a very different experience.

Australia is very large, and has low population density. The UK is small, with very high population density. This works against the "shared bandwidth" nature of wireless comms. I've even noticed it over the last year - my 3.5G connection in Central London was noticeably faster in January 2008 than it was in December 08, just because more people got on the mobile broadband bandwagon.

The providers in the UK are just desperately trying to maintain the "it's really really fast!!!111" illusion for as long as they can, by doing image compression, proxying et al, all the while knowing that every new customer is actually slowing the whole thing down for everybody else.

Comment: Re:Arn't you confusing Khz and Kbit? (Score 1) 743

by mi11house (#27168411) Attached to: Young People Prefer "Sizzle Sounds" of MP3 Format
Professional studio equipment will usually offer A-D/D-A conversion or interfacing at:
  • 16-bit, 44.1kHz aka CD-quality
  • 16-bit, 48kHz (original DAT maximum)
  • 24-bit versions at the above rates
  • 24-bit versions at twice these rates e.g. 88.2/96kHz
  • 24-bit, 192kHz

In a studio situation, you absolutely want to record at "quite a bit higher than even an uncompressed CD". Particularly when multiple streams of such audio are mixed in the digital domain, you want the noise floor as low as possible. The final master will be 24-bit/192k and only at the last possible minute will it be rendered down to 16/44.1k for the CD press.

Comment: Re:Embedded Difference? (Score 1) 596

by mi11house (#26997387) Attached to: Microsoft Sees Linux As Bigger Competitor Than Apple

Outside of the US, Apple doesn't sell.

The hundreds of people I've just seen inside the Apple Store on Regent Street in London would beg to differ.

If you look around a typical coffee shop in Central London, you will see just as many Apple machines as PCs, if not more. This is probably a function of necessity (lots of visual/graphic design people), appreciation of the Macbook hardware design, general affluence and a very effective localised "I'm a Mac" ad campaign. I would estimate at least 95% of the laptop PCs you see inside a Starbucks are running Windows.

I don't think you can linearly-extrapolate your German experience - In *my* experience, Germany is very pro-open-source. But I'm not going to make a blanket statement about the rest of Europe ;-)

Comment: Re:I RTFA and now speculate (Score 1) 305

by mi11house (#26559205) Attached to: RAM Disk Puts New Spin On the SSD
This box definitely needs some firmware/FPGA tuning if it's not able to saturate its SATA connections.

Add to that the fact that the two-channel "RAID" configuration is *nowhere near* twice as quick as the single bus - this thing urgently needs some performance tweaks to fully realise the potential of the concept.

Comment: Re:Not Melbourne. (Score 1) 887

by mi11house (#26415701) Attached to: How do you get to work?
I couldn't believe it when Eastlink didn't include a train reservation. So backwards-thinking!

The radial line arrangement is a problem, but spending just a fraction of what the state government did on roads like Eastlink would solve this. There's even space allocated for some lines.

Since moving from Melbourne to London I ride a bike though - get fit, save money, more space for everybody else on the Tube!

And if I can do it in London (cool/cold temperate-zone weather), there's no reason why anyone living within 10km of their Melbourne workplace (mild/warm temperate-zone) can't ride to work either...

Comment: Factoid... (Score 2, Informative) 1589

by mi11house (#26058277) Attached to: When Teachers Are Obstacles To Linux In Education
Pretty sure you've got your definition of "factoid" messed up there champ. Like most people, you have assumed it means "little fact" or perhaps "little-known fact". Possibly due to abuse by CNN using the word in this sense.

From Wikipedia:

A factoid is a spurious - unverified, incorrect, or fabricated - statement formed and asserted as a fact, but with no veracity. The word appears in the Oxford English Dictionary as "something which becomes accepted as fact, although it may not be true.

It muddies the intention of the sentence when you use this word, because its meaning has been overloaded like this. I would have gone with:

"which contains an argument I have not seen mentioned before"

[dons flame-retardant suit]

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